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Capuchin

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About Capuchin

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  1. Welcome to the boards! I have to agree with SansFin (well, technically, I don't have to, but I've learned it makes life easier if I do), TikiSoo is one of the good ones, a class act. I'm sure, over time, you'll get to appreciate her. A major problem with posting is you lose intonations and body language signals. I'm sure she didn't mean her comment as scolding/dictatorial. Hope you enjoy your time on these boards. We do tend to grow on people (like a fungus).
  2. As I stated in my post: "They ended up not using my story, . . ." It is not word building. It is worldbuilding. If you place the story in 1880s Laramie, 1930s Chicago, or 1960s LA, the reader automatically knows what the streets and buildings look like, what people wear, and even the music coming from an open window. If you place the story on a moon of Rigel5 in the 27th Century, you have to supply those details. More importantly, you need to know a lot more about that world, and its people, than will ever be put on paper. Everything from the electrical grid to weather forecasting to wher
  3. In 1986, a tv production company optioned the broadcast rights to a short story I'd written. Their series was in the same genre as my story, but that's where any similarity ended. My main interest was the money (they paid 8.6x as much for a five-year option as I'd gotten for originally selling the story to the zine, and there'd be more money if they actually used it). My agent wouldn't put into the contract anything about my approving their script or submitting my own, citing my lack of a track record in Hollywood, and his not wanting to change a fast and easy bog-standard sale into draw
  4. It's never my right or duty to weigh in with writerly advice, and I'm a firm believer in Kipling's "There are nine and sixty ways of constructing tribal lays, and every single one of them is right!" That said, and keeping in mind that my forte is short stories, not screenplays, I don't think you're doing yourself any favors by always reading subtitles. The written word is distinctly different from the spoken word. When creating text, you have to have an eye for whitespace, deliberate imbalance of paragraph lengths, and a hundred other visual clues to provoke interest (or, at least, to av
  5. I suspect her comment was a sly way to inform me she's still upset I forgot something on her grocery list and bought a few little toys which caught my eye. To bring this back to Christmas, we don't really 'do' December 25th. It's not one of her holidays, and for most of my working life, a holiday meant extra work when the staff was out of the office. We exchange gifts on St. Nicholas Day, January 1st, and January 7th (Orthodox Christmas).
  6. It took a while, but I finally remembered the source of the quote I wanted to use when talking about Dick Shawn: "What does it matter if it was an illusion? It worked! So don't tell me this is you life-size. I can't use you life-size. I need Alan Swanns as big as I can get them!" My Favorite Year (1982). That's really the only way Dick Shawn, and a lot of other entertainers, work for me: full blast, give it all you got, crank it up to eleven performances. That way, they're great. They just don't do anything in 'easy listening' mode. You may want to stop reading now. Really, it might
  7. True, but I don't want a toned-down version of Dick Shawn. That's like ordering Widower Chili just because you like the color and then mixing in enough crushed oyster crackers so it's safe for your toddler.
  8. Odd bit of serendipity -- just last week I saw where someone had redesigned a BD-5J to use six of those engines (two on each wing, two on the tail) instead of a single large one. It only exists in the computer, and those aren't rated for manflight, and it'd probably cost as much, if not more, than the original design, but it's intriguing that people are still interested in that design.
  9. I think Dick Shawn is best in small, intense doses. I loved his character in The Producers (1967), and yes, obviously perfectly gay. I just can't see his frenetic nature carrying an entire movie. Even if he could have pulled it off, I would have been exhausted halfway though.
  10. ". . . merits it somewhat." ?????????? It was an autobiography written and directed by a flamboyant egoist-- self-indulgence was a key element! Every moment had to be over the top, exactly the same way he saw his life. To be fair, I think there were as many unitards as leotards . . . Having him become introspective might have made a better movie, but it wouldn't have been true to the character. An egoist deflects. "Is there something wrong with me?" is quickly trodden underfoot by "Remember that great thing I created which no one else could ever do?" and we're once again in
  11. I just don't see Louis Nye pulling it off -- he had too much of a straight imitating a gay imitating a straight vibe. Dick Van Dyke (no pun intended) would have been perfect.
  12. I think it's a legal thing -- a bar or pipe under a certain diameter and shorter than a specific length isn't classed as a weapon. It's like how, in the US, a shotgun with an 18 1/2" barrel is a legitimate tool for home protection, but one with a 17 1/2" barrel is an illegal firearm, and simple possession of one can land you in jail for 20 years.
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