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psmoviephile

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About psmoviephile

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  1. Many years ago I saw a movie on TV ( I think it was on the old AMC channel) called "The Silver Cord." (1933) It starred Laura Hope Crewes as monster mom; Irene Dunne and Joel McCrea played the other main roles. It seems to have dropped out of sight since then, although it was well-known in its day as the film version of a popular stage play of the same name by Sidney Howard. Amazon has it for sale, but only in Region 2 formats -- in other words, not playable in the U.S. Is anyone else familiar with this very entertaining movie? It would be great if TCM could program it.
  2. Thanks for the information! What a strange, complicated history the copyright on this film is. But why would NBC want exclusive rights? (I thought Paramount was now the owner). Wouldn't they profit more by leasing it to more venues? More likely, I suppose, is that their eye is on the advertising revenue they can get by restricting viewings of this movie to network television. Strange... Why would anyone these days would anyone want to watch a movie with commercial interruptions?
  3. Is TCM not showing "It's a Wonderful Life" this holiday season, or have I just missed it? I realize it's no longer in public domain, but why can't I find a showing - especially at Christmastime?
  4. Hi! That sounds like "Honeymoon in Vegas" with Nicholas Cage, James Caan, and Sarah Jessica Parker. Or possibly "Indecent Proposal" with Robert Redford and Demi Moore? Both of these came out very early 90's.
  5. Mercedes was in Seattle around 1965 at the Cirque Playhouse (long gone), playing Annie Sullivan in "The Miracle Worker." As you can imagine, she was excellent in that part. I happened to meet her because I was in another play at the same theater, playing a juvenile lead in a lame play called, I think, "Glad Tidings," also with Stu Erwin. A lovely man. But I degress.
  6. Has anyone mentioned Deborah Kerr? Whoever said Moira Shearer, I second that emotion! Certainly Rita H.
  7. Phyllis Thaxter, yes - she was delightful. I especially remember her in a Barbara Stanwyck movie called "No Man of Her Own," in which she plays a new bride who gets killed in a train wreck. Stanwyck assumes her identity (she just happens to be wearing Phyllis's wedding ring when the two women are in the washroom - and wham! - that's when the train derails. Oddly enough, this grim melodrama was remade in the 90s as a comedy starring Ricki Lake. Was it "Mrs. Winterbourne?"
  8. Yes, I would love to see TCM screen "The Red House," one of my favorites. It used to be shown on late night television in the late 50s and I believe it was a hit when it was released (1947?), but for some reason few people seem to know about it. Edward G. Robinson, Judith Anderson, Ona Munsen (!), Lon McAllister, Julie London, Rory Calhoun - what a cast! And gorgeous B&W photography, along with a hard-working score by Miklos Rozsa. You can find it on DVD, but the print is in terrible condition - the sound even worse. Apparently, because it's fallen into the public domain, it's in no one's interest to restore it and re-introduce it to movie lovers.
  9. Here, in no particular order, is my short list of movies with great color photography: BLACK NARCISSUS, THE RED SHOES, THE CONFORMIST, LES GIRLS, AMERICAN BEAUTY, LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN, TALENTED MR. RIPLEY, THE PAINTED VEIL (2006), CHINATOWN, MCCABE AND MRS. MILLER, SINGIN' IN THE RAIN, THE PIRATE, MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS, WOMAN ON THE VERGE OF A NERVOUS BREAKDOWN.
  10. I've enjoyed reading your quotes from James Agee, who I much admire. I own those books, too! I would be surprised, however, if they are in public domain, as you say. Only 2 or 3 years ago they were reissued in paperback in very nice editions. I was working at Borders at the time, and I could kick myself for not buying up some copies on the spot as gifts for friends - and to replace my rather dog-eared copies. I think I must have been pretty broke at the time!
  11. I completely share your love of the Jack Cardiff films. Black Narcissus and Red Shoes among the finest of all color films. A wonderful documentary about him and his work was shown here last year at the Palm Springs Film Festival, with the director present to discuss. I'm sorry to say I can't recall the title at the moment, but it shouldn't be hard to track down if you haven't seen it.
  12. I share your enthusiasm for Agee. I guess I was first aware of film criticism, as such, from reading Pauline Kael, who constantly references Agee. She obviously admired him. (She was no slouch!). You mentioned "A Death in the Family," one of the great American novels. I don't know if you're into "classical" music, but there's a marvelous piece by Samuel Barber called "Knoxville: Summer of 1915," which is a setting for soprano and orchestra of the Prologue to Agee's book - the part that all in italics. Check it out - it's gorgeous.
  13. Yes, Production Designer Cedric Gibbons. Photography by Joseph Ruttenberg. Have you noticed how much costumes can influence your response to a film? I'm thinking of the gorgeous black evening gown that Garson wears at a party celebrating - I think - their wedding anniversary. The night he gives her the fabulous necklace and she cries over the old one, hidden away in a drawer. That dress knocked me out when I saw it and I've found the image of it has stayed with me. A case of costume perfectly showcasing an actor's beauty.
  14. That key! How believable is it that the cottage would have remained untouched and just as it was years ago? Even down to the flowers on the tree branch! Not that it matters. MGM perfected this brand of delirious hokum in the 1940s. Black and white photography was at its glossiest; the whole production persuades the viewer to overlook such details as believability! Dont get me wrong -- I love it!
  15. I first watched "Random Harvest" a couple years ago, while I was trying to get over a nasty flu bug. I switched on TCM and there was this movie - already in progress -- that I found irresistible. The funny thing is, I turned it on at the point where Ronald Colman is already returned to his family business, he's sitting at his desk , buzzes for his secretary to come in - and in walks Greer Garson! What could this be, I was wondering? I just stuck with it - nothing better to do - and it all started making sense, in a Hollywood kind of way of course. Later, when I watched the film again, I was amazed that there was a whole, rather lengthy first act!
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