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misswonderly3

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Everything posted by misswonderly3

  1. I figure she ran off and found the cops and told them what was going on, but opted not to return with them...why would she want to go back there? But I always thought it was she who alerted the police about the situation. Maybe she went home ( she must have had a home apart from Lee J . Cobb's "cottage" ) made herself a nice cup of tea, and collapsed into an armchair. Job well done.
  2. Third viewing for me of The Dark Past. It's ok, but will never be right up there in the pantheon of Great or even Pretty Good noirs. And as some have observed, it's more a "psychobabble" drama than a noir -- not that I get bogged down in labels. I always like William Holden, so that's a plus in this film. I also like Nina Foch. For some reason, I sometimes get her mixed up with Patricia Neal, even though they don't really look alike. Something about them both being good actresses and attractive women, both were in some fine movies, but never made it to "A List" Hollywood actress
  3. Third viewing for me of The Dark Past. It's ok, but will never be right up there in the pantheon of Great or even Pretty Good noirs. And as some have observed, it's more a "psychobabble" drama than a noir -- not that I get bogged down in labels. I always like William Holden, so that's a plus in this film. I also like Nina Foch. For some reason, I sometimes get her mixed up with Patricia Neal, even though they don't really look alike. Something about them both being good actresses and attractive women, both were in some fine movies, but never made it to "A List" Hollywood actress
  4. Nakano, we seem to have a pattern of misunderstanding each other here. It is not my intention or desire to "correct" you, nor was I making a "federal case" out of anything. You are right: I did not read your post carefully enough, or I may have seen that you were aware they recorded the two Noir Alley films in one session, but were just wondering why Dana Delany did not bring a change of clothes for the second "wraparound" with Eddie. I do actually think someone else on this thread did mention that Miss Delany was wearing the same outfit in both shows. But I'd have to scroll back
  5. Well, no I don't think all rock music is about those two things. But listen to the lyrics of "Helter Skelter". It seems fairly obvious to me.
  6. Somebody else here mentioned that they noticed Dana Delany was wearing the same clothes for both Gloria Grahame Noir Alley screenings. Here's my guess, although it could be entirely wrong: Although Eddie said, "Hey, Dana will be here again in 2 weeks to introduce another Gloria Grahame film", I would not take that literally. I don't believe they filmed the first session ( for Human Desire ), waited two weeks, and then came back to discuss The Glass Wall. That wouldn't be practical. I think it's much more likely that Eddie and Dana arranged to co-host Noir Alley for two Gloria G
  7. What ? Seriously? You must be under a certain age-- I think just about everyone over the age of 50 has most definitely heard the White album, even if only once.
  8. Right, but I care more about the music than the lyrics ( this applies to just about all artists, not just the Beatles) and there's some music on the White Album that's as good as anything they ever did. "That said", yup, that Walrus has some pretty arresting things to say. ...Back to the White Album: One of my favourites, in fact one of my favourite Beatles songs, period, is "Dear Prudence", which actually is kind of reminiscent of a nursery rhyme.
  9. Yes. Although I love Hitchcock - at least his films - I have heard that he did have this unfortunate tendency to dominate, intimidate, torture (ok, maybe not literally torture) his female leads. He seemed to find it amusing. I can especially see him doing it with someone as quiet and vulnerable as Kim Novak. Not a nice side to the great director at all.
  10. Thanks for the heads up about that, Thompson. I like Ken Burns documentaries. Have you seen the one about the history of jazz? I think I might have seen a couple of episodes of the baseball series, but never seen all nine innings.
  11. Huh. I always thought "Helter Skelter" was about sex.
  12. Maybe, but for silly nursery rhymes, they're pretty darn good. Come to think of it, I love nursery rhymes.
  13. So, I'm just curious....your user info states "Location: Portland OR / Cornwall, England". There are several "Portlands" in the world...is it Portland, Oregon, in which case I assume you're an American currently living in Britain ?? Or are you a Brit and actually do reside in Cornwall, England ? Sorry, It's not my intention to be aggressively nosey about this, but I 'm just wondering if you're English or American or both. Anyway, I could be wrong about the swimming thing. But Pinkie and his gang are actually from London, where I don't imagine much recreational swimmin
  14. I believe that it is much more unusual to learn to swim in Britain, at least back then, than it is in the States and Canada. North America has , besides all the ocean ports, an abundance of rivers and lakes. It is quite a normal thing, even in some ways a safety precaution, for parents to make sure their kids have swimming lessons, or at least learn to swim somehow, even if it's just to dog paddle. However, from my ( admittedly limited) knowledge of English customs in the 20th century, I think it would have been exceptional for someone of Pinkie's social status and class to hav
  15. I hope you're not saying I'm lacking in intuition, merely because I did not have an "inkling" of what you were saying re. your criticisms about Brighton Rock. I would venture to say I'm at least as intuitive as the next person. I just did not find the film to have the qualities that repelled you so much. But, to repeat what I said earlier, that's ok, we all respond to movies differently, our reactions to them are very individual and personal. I'm not faulting you for the reaction you had to B.R., I'm just saying I had a different response. I don't think that makes me unintuitive .
  16. Interesting. I read Confederacy of Dunces, but I really had to force myself to finish it. I know it's supposed to be hilarious, but sorry, it didn't make me laugh or even smile. Maybe part of the problem was I couldn't stand the main character, I just found him irritating and obnoxious. I guess his dysfunctional personality is supposed to be funny, but I just thought it was infuriating and sad. I did like the New Orleans setting, though. Novels -- many of them not even noir novels ! , Shakespeare, baseball,...all these off-topic discussions must be driving Katie crazy !
  17. Sorry, laffite, but no, I did not see what you meant, not even an inkling. The only thing you mentioned that I did understand why you'd have a problem with it was the almost incomprehensible cockney accents ( even though they were in Brighton, I think the spivs had all moved down to Brighton to pursue lower-hanging criminal fruit...). I don't think the film presented "relentless force" any more than a good many other noirs I've seen. But again, sometimes a movie just strikes us the wrong way, and that's that. It does sound as though you do like British films and tv show
  18. I believe it's Macbeth he quotes, it's when he first appears on the scene. But he actually quotes lines from Shakespeare every time you see him ( which isn't all that often, I think the guy has 2 or 3 scenes altogether ? ) I'm sorry you had such a negative response to Brighton Rock. I disagree with everything you said about it, I did not feel it was "hyper and affected", or "phony, forced, or rambunctious" at all. Still, full points for giving reasons why you didn't like it, rather than just saying, "I didn't like it". I think the other person here who felt that way about t
  19. Just a few more thoughts re. Brighton Rock: I can't recall how old Pinkie is in the book, I know he's young...but 17? Really? 17 is really young. It's odd to see this extremely young thug intimidating and bossing all these older men around. I know it's partly Pinkie's toughness and strong will, and certainly I can see a much younger person being top dog in a gang of older guys. But 17 is so young, he'd have had so little experience. But maybe that is the way Graham Greene wrote it, I don't remember. The Hermione Baddeley character: How come Pinkie didn't decide to off her? H
  20. In the interests of genuine honesty ( as opposed to, uh, false honesty), I must confess I have only read Portrait of the Artist and Dubliners. I cannot pretend that I have read Finnegan's Wake - but come on, who has? There are probably 10 people in the entire world at this moment who actually have. I don't even intend to ever read it. However, I do hope someday to read Ulysses, but only for the naughty bits, which I've heard are very salacious. I'll probably skip everything else.
  21. He never became a Catholic, much to the disappointment of his friend J.R.R. Tolkien. I think he was Anglican, but he regarded himself more as a Christian than as a member of any particular denomination of that faith. He wrote a very personal book about his "conversion", titled "Surprised by Joy". I love his Narnia books with a deep and fervent affection, must have read all of them at least three times. Nothing even remotely noirish about them, though.
  22. In the book, as Eddie mentioned, that is not the ending. The girl returns to her flat anticipating listening to what she fondly believes will be a sweet declaration of love from Pinkie, only to experience the "worst horror yet". Her hearing Pinkie's true feelings for her on the record occurs "off -screen" or, actually , "off-book", but we know she will hear his message of hatred and contempt. But in a way, I think it would have been a good thing , or at least, in the long run, a helpful thing, for Rose to have heard that recording. She would have become a lot wiser, and pe
  23. It's those Cockney accents ! I watch a lot of British films, and even I have trouble understanding what they're saying half the time, especially those thick East London dialects. ( well, not London, Brighton I guess, but close.) There's a hilarious SNL sketch from a few years ago, featuring the brilliant Bill Hader. It really nails that incomprehensible working class accent:
  24. Yes, the novel is almost as replete with Catholic guilt and meditations on God and sin and good and evil and hell, etc. as Joyce's work. Sex, too, as I recall. Most of this is left out of the movie. It's sort of too bad, because all the Catholic philosophizing and angsting is part of what makes the book interesting. But the film is still very good, and a relatively faithful rendition of the novel -- which, given Greene's participation, is to be expected.
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