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misswonderly3

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Everything posted by misswonderly3

  1. Interesting point. We can continue this on a thread that was started much earlier. This one: http://forums.tcm.com/jive/tcm/thread.jspa?threadID=151734&tstart=0
  2. This is driving me crazy: I know at the end of Anthony Asquith's The Browning Version -the very end, just before the credits -some music is played, very noble sounding music. I know it's by Beethoven, but I can't identify it. Google and Youtube were useless. Can anybody out there, Asquith fans, classical music fans, tell me what that Beethoven piece is? Edited by: misswonderly on May 24, 2010 3:00 PM
  3. Les Habs sont frites. Je pense que vous ont raison. (I think you're right.) Nobody today sings like those fine singers of yore. Plus, so many of the songs today are rubbish in comparison. It's not just the singers, it's the songs.
  4. Ella 's ok. I don't mind her. Some people find her duets with Louis Armstrong a bit cutesy. Chaqu'on a son gout.
  5. Nothing wrong with campy. It depends how it's done. Vincent Price did it with aplomb. His scenes in Laura, especially the ones with Judith Anderson, are a joy to watch.
  6. Walter Huston was in The Devil and Daniel Webster (aka All That Money Can Buy ) with Simone Simon
  7. I've seen it. It's one of my favourite SNL's bits. That show is inconsistent, it doesn't always make me laugh. But almost anything with Bill Hader in it, and especially his Vincent Price imitations, are hilarious! (Did you catch the imitation of Ben Mankiewicz a week or two ago? I think it was posted as a link here.)
  8. If they made it an Essential, and especially if they found a better print for it, it would be a far, far, better thing they have done than they have ever done before.
  9. I love Clint Eastwood! I'm very happy to hear there's a birthday tribute coming up for him on TCM. One reason I think he's so good is, he's not what he appears to be. A very superficial look at his work, especially his earlier films, might have some forming the opinion "Oh, he's all about guns and violence."This is so not true. I find all his work -but especially films such as The Outlaw Josey Wales and especially Unforgiven to be very deep examinations of issues such as freedom, independence, defying authority, community, and the choice of whether and when it is ever ok to use violence. I
  10. Thanks, Holly. I think I missed that earlier thread because I didn't start reading and writing on this TCM fan site until mid-April or so, and the Eastwood thread goes back to March. Anyway, I read the posts on that with interest. Maybe the WebAdmin people here should lock this one and bring the earlier thread sort of forward, especially as the event is coming up fairly soon now.
  11. PrinceSaliano wrote: *I find Price to be a bit of ham* Exactly! That's what I love about him! And he's a lovable ham. You mentioned His Kind of Woman; Price is deliciously campy in it. The scene with him standing nobly at the prow of his sinking rowboat is priceless -if you'll forgive the pun.
  12. I'm kind of surprised there hasn't been anything posted about the upcoming Clint Eastwood 80th birthday tribute. Aren't there any Clint fans out there? I love this guy. One reason I think he's so good is, he's not what he appears to be. A very superficial look at his work, especially his earlier films, might have some forming the opinion "Oh, he's all about guns and violence."This is *so* not true. I find all his work -but especially films such as The Outlaw Josey Wales and especially Unforgiven to be very deep examinations of issues such as freedom, independence, defying authority, commu
  13. not trying to step on faceinthecrowd's toes here, (figuratively speaking, of course), but I believe he is referring to King's Row.
  14. Agreed. I love both those ladies. Dinah Washington's right up there too.
  15. I am a fan of all those wonderful actors you mention, as I'm sure are a great many people. You're right about these fine stars being associated too often with only "horror " films. Some of them -actually, I'm thinking of Vincent Price in particular - were also quite good with comedy, even if the "genre" of movie in which they appear funny is not categorized as a comedy. (I love Vincent's unruffled, lying-is-second-nature-to-me persona in Laura. ) However, I'm guessing that NamathGuarantee only meant that, if TCM needed an excuse to show a Vincent Price marathon, Hallowe'en would be an app
  16. Pre-1960: (in no particular order): Alfred Hitchcock, Otto Preminger, Fritz Lang, Anthony Mann, John Huston. Billy Wilder, Nicholas Ray non-Hollywood: Ingmar Bergman, Federico Fellini, Luis Bunuel, Pedro Almodovar, Mike Leigh Post 1960: Woody Allen, Martin Scorsese, Joel and Ethan Coen, Spike Lee, and I keep changing my mind about Quentin Tarantino ...probably left quite a few out from all eras
  17. also, The Clock (1945) with Judy Garland and Robert Walker.
  18. There's no question in my mind that Ethel Waters was a better singer than Lena. There's a funny scene in Cabin in the Sky where Ethel has been singing in a sort of gentle, almost restrained style (for her), and then she "loses it" for a moment and breaks into a much gutsier mode that was actually her usual way of singing. Eddie Anderson looks at her, aghast, and almost reproachfully says her name ("Petunia!") and she apologetically returns to the much more toned down vocal style. Ethel could really belt it out. Lena Horne had a fine voice in a very different way, plus she was much mor
  19. The Big Sleep . Why? it's so much fun! In fact, I regard it as more a comedy than a "crime" movie or a film noir. It's so damned funny, it makes me laugh too much to be a film noir. How about Bogart's visits to the two book stores, first with the snippy and uncooperative Agnes, who's probably being rude to him because he has deliberately made himself look like a nerd. But his next visit, to the second book shop, yields quite different results. Flirtatious Dorothy Malone decides that "they're closed for the rest of the day" and locks the door, the better to assist Bogie with his research. It's
  20. Sorry, I'm not sure what exactly you mean by "homefront" movies. Films that were made and set in the U.S. during World War II? If that's the case, The Human Comedy (1943) comes to mind, an engaging and somehow innocent little movie. Mickey Rooney plays the lead, and there's a very early view of Robert Mitchum in a bit part.
  21. So, I watched The Duke is Tops and Cabin in the Sky last night. I found both films fascinating from the point of view of depicting life back then in the African-American community. I know these depictions are not necessarily accurate, but neither is any movie from another time, unless it's a documentary. The scenes in The Duke is Tops that feature Lena's friend as a snake-oil salesman are the most interesting ones in the film. He could talk a good talk as well as sing and dance. And I loved "The Cats and the Fiddles" Lena is so sexy and beautiful in both pictures. She had a very ex
  22. sorry, messed up. see next post Edited by: misswonderly on May 22, 2010 11:07 AM
  23. Deborah Kerr was in The Sundowners with Robert Mitchum
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