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shakespeare

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  1. SimsFreak here wondering if there are any other SimsFreaks (you know who you are!) going on the TCM Cruise. Been playing the Sims PC Game for many years now, and would be interested in meeting any other SimsFreaks for some SimsTalk. Am especially excited about the new Sims Medieval game. So if you're as fanatical about the Sims as I am, leave a message and maybe we can meet up during the cruise. SuSu and see you there. Shakespeare
  2. check out my review of Flesh Gordon
  3. I'd like to see Ben M. give a writers workshop
  4. I'd never given this film much thought before because I'd always concidered it some run of the mill skin flick that was dressed up a bit to gain a wider audience. Bargain basement films have always intrigued me. The lower the budget, the worse the acting, the more I want to watch it. Long story short, I found the film on line, downloaded it and watched it. Well, it's a very raunchy movie. TCM will never show this film, and that's as it should be. It does have some standard pornographic scenes in the film. But, these scenes are relatively brief, and are the only thing I would call "standard" about this... hilareous, bawdy, outrageous contribution to the indepedent bargain basement film genre. Now, please, do not misunderstand me. It's, by any standard, a truly awful film. For a supposed porn flick, its singularly un-arousing. For a comedy, it's really not very funny. The acting is pathetic, the dialogue is so bad you can almost smell it... just everything that's bad about the worst films you've ever seen, this film tries to top. Even writing an article about it, is like trying to find some redeeming factors about a pig. Whatever, the film does fit neatly in a certain category, and it is not pornography. For example, I'm a amoung the many fans of Mystery Science Theatre 3000. It was a badly needed venue for films that are amoung the worst of the worst, while the characters make these cynacle, funny remarks about the film. This is the realm that "Flesh Gordon" falls squarely under. The so-bad-they're-good types of films of which MST3K fans are so enamoured. While watching "Flesh", I could just hear Joel, Tom Servo and Croooow rudely commenting in the foreground. In addition, "Flesh" was made in the early 1970's, which was not only the height of the sexual revolution, but also the height of the experimental, independent film era. One thing that cannot be denied about "Flesh" , and other films of its era, is that, despite all the disorganized thinking that went into making them, they are almost all truly cinematic. A story is told, however ineptly, in terms of moving images. The film-makers are just doing it for next to no money with extremely limited resources. It's this important factor that tests the imagination of the director. In the case of "Flesh Gordon" its two directors, Howard Ziehm and Michael Benvineste, both pass this crucial test. Film fans have got to see this film to know what I'm talking about. Its basic scenario is as follows: The planet Earth is being bombarded by a viscious Sex-Ray which causes people to run amok trying to nail each other. Flesh Gordon (Jason Williams) is the son of the famous Professor Gordon (the obscure character actor, John Hoyt) who has located the origin of the Sex-Ray, the planet Porno. Flesh is on a plane, flirting with the voluptuous Dale Ardor (SuzanneFields), when suddenly the Sex-Ray hits the plane and an **** ensues which includes the planes pilots. The plane ends up crash landing, and Flesh and Dale have survived. They run across a small cottage owned by Dr. Flexi Jerkoff (Joseph Hudgins),with a thoroughly un-recognizable accent, who turns out to be a former associate of Flesh's father. Jerkoff has constructed a space ship that takes the trio to planet Porno amoung some misadventures along the way. In short order, they are captured by the villanous Emporer Wang (William Dennis Hunt) and many wild and sexy adventures unfold. The film stays very true to its source material, the Flash Gordon serials of the 1930's. It includes a cliff hanger ending just prior to an intermission. (I wonder what film-goers were supposed to do during the intermission, hmmm). In the films climax (climax?) , Flesh must fight this massive (and ****) Monster (the un-credited velvety voice of Craig T. Nelson of the TV series "Coach" fame), then blow up the Sex-Ray machine, and save planet Porno for... a group of freedom loving homosexuals. The ending actually pays homage to the films, "King Kong" and, believe or not, "The Wizard of Oz". The film truly lives up to its forebearers, the Comic Bulesque revues of the early part of the 20th Century. I was reminded of the film musical, "Gypsy". I'm thinking of the part where one of the Burlesque Queens tells Louise, "No talent?! Honey, to be a stripper, all ya gotta have is no talent." Well, all the actors in this film have zero talent in abundace. But, while watching the film, one can clearly see that the films makers have got something going for themselves. It's very imaginative film-making. The art direction is quite good. I mean, you're obviously looking at models, but the buildings and sets have a nice, almost fairy tale like quality to them. And, speaking of Art Direction, check out the scene where Queen Amora hijacks Flesh in a swan shaped space ship. It sort of comes out of nowhere, and there is this ethereal, serene beauty to it, as the ship floats amoung the heavenly host of stars. The editing is not bad either. OK, it's not very good. If not for some of the gratuitous sex scenes, the film would move along nicely. But, not all the sex scenes are purely gratuitous. Sex is intregal to the film, and actually moves the plot forward at times, almost like musical numbers in a Busby Berkley movie. Actually, the film does have a dance number in it. Think naked line dancing. I'm not kidding... OK, see the film if you don't believe me. Another scene to look out for is the robot attack scene. It's totally priceless. You'll never look at a rotating drill the same way again. The special effects in the film rise well above other films typical of this genre. No less than special effects artists and future Academy Award winners, Jon Dykstra (uncredited) (he did the special FX for the"Star Wars" series) and Rick Baker (make-up for "A Werewolf in London") were employed in the making of "Flesh". The film has Clay-mation creatures, like that used in Ray Harryhausen films, and something audiences surely did not expect. This stop-motion animation was done by Jim Danforth (credited as Mij Htrofnad) who actually worked with Harryhausen on some of his films. That in itself is why I love these so-called "bad" movies, that you so often find these brilliant artists involved at the very beginning of their careers. Of course, you just as often find all these fallen movie stars at the end of their careers. The up-shot is, if you're a movie lover (bad, good or indifferent), you really should check out this film. Just don't forget to take a cold shower after watching it. Memorable lines from the film: There aren't any.
  5. I'd never given this film much thought before because I'd always concidered it some run of the mill skin flick that was dressed up a bit to gain a wider audience. Bargain basement films have always intrigued me. The lower the budget, the worse the acting, the more I want to watch it. Long story short, I found the film on line, downloaded it and watched it. Well, it's a very raunchy movie. TCM will never show this film, and that's as it should be. It does have some standard pornographic scenes in the film. But, these scenes are relatively brief, and are the only thing I would call "standard" about this... hilareous, bawdy, outrageous contribution to the indepedent bargain basement film genre. Now, please, do not misunderstand me. It's, by any standard, a truly awful film. For a supposed porn flick, its singularly un-arousing. For a comedy, it's really not very funny. The acting is pathetic, the dialogue is so bad you can almost smell it... just everything that's bad about the worst films you've ever seen, this film tries to top. Even writing an article about it, is like trying to find some redeeming factors about a pig. Whatever, the film does fit neatly in a certain category, and it is not pornography. For example, I'm a amoung the many fans of Mystery Science Theatre 3000. It was a badly needed venue for films that are amoung the worst of the worst, while the characters make these cynacle, funny remarks about the film. This is the realm that "Flesh Gordon" falls squarely under. The so-bad-they're-good types of films of which MST3K fans are so enamoured. While watching "Flesh", I could just hear Joel, Tom Servo and Croooow rudely commenting in the foreground. In addition, "Flesh" was made in the early 1970's, which was not only the height of the sexual revolution, but also the height of the experimental, independent film era. One thing that cannot be denied about "Flesh" , and other films of its era, is that, despite all the disorganized thinking that went into making them, they are almost all truly cinematic. A story is told, however ineptly, in terms of moving images. The film-makers are just doing it for next to no money with extremely limited resources. It's this important factor that tests the imagination of the director. In the case of "Flesh Gordon" its two directors, Howard Ziehm and Michael Benvineste, both pass this crucial test. Film fans have got to see this film to know what I'm talking about. Its basic scenario is as follows: The planet Earth is being bombarded by a viscious Sex-Ray which causes people to run amok trying to nail each other. Flesh Gordon (Jason Williams) is the son of the famous Professor Gordon (the obscure character actor, John Hoyt) who has located the origin of the Sex-Ray, the planet Porno. Flesh is on a plane, flirting with the voluptuous Dale Ardor (SuzanneFields), when suddenly the Sex-Ray hits the plane and an **** ensues which includes the planes pilots. The plane ends up crash landing, and Flesh and Dale have survived. They run across a small cottage owned by Dr. Flexi Jerkoff (Joseph Hudgins),with a thoroughly un-recognizable accent, who turns out to be a former associate of Flesh's father. Jerkoff has constructed a space ship that takes the trio to planet Porno amoung some misadventures along the way. In short order, they are captured by the villanous Emporer Wang (William Dennis Hunt) and many wild and sexy adventures unfold. The film stays very true to its source material, the Flash Gordon serials of the 1930's. It includes a cliff hanger ending just prior to an intermission. (I wonder what film-goers were supposed to do during the intermission, hmmm). In the films climax (climax?) , Flesh must fight this massive (and ****) Monster (the un-credited velvety voice of Craig T. Nelson of the TV series "Coach" fame), then blow up the Sex-Ray machine, and save planet Porno for... a group of freedom loving homosexuals. The ending actually pays homage to the films, "King Kong" and, believe or not, "The Wizard of Oz". The film truly lives up to its forebearers, the Comic Bulesque revues of the early part of the 20th Century. I was reminded of the film musical, "Gypsy". I'm thinking of the part where one of the Burlesque Queens tells Louise, "No talent?! Honey, to be a stripper, all ya gotta have is no talent." Well, all the actors in this film have zero talent in abundace. But, while watching the film, one can clearly see that the films makers have got something going for themselves. It's very imaginative film-making. The art direction is quite good. I mean, you're obviously looking at models, but the buildings and sets have a nice, almost fairy tale like quality to them. And, speaking of Art Direction, check out the scene where Queen Amora hijacks Flesh in a swan shaped space ship. It sort of comes out of nowhere, and there is this ethereal, serene beauty to it, as the ship floats amoung the heavenly host of stars. The editing is not bad either. OK, it's not very good. If not for some of the gratuitous sex scenes, the film would move along nicely. But, not all the sex scenes are purely gratuitous. Sex is intregal to the film, and actually moves the plot forward at times, almost like musical numbers in a Busby Berkley movie. Actually, the film does have a dance number in it. Think naked line dancing. I'm not kidding... OK, see the film if you don't believe me. Another scene to look out for is the robot attack scene. It's totally priceless. You'll never look at a rotating drill the same way again. The special effects in the film rise well above other films typical of this genre. No less than special effects artists and future Academy Award winners, Jon Dykstra (uncredited) (he did the special FX for the"Star Wars" series) and Rick Baker (make-up for "A Werewolf in London") were employed in the making of "Flesh". The film has Clay-mation creatures, like that used in Ray Harryhausen films, and something audiences surely did not expect. This stop-motion animation was done by Jim Danforth (credited as Mij Htrofnad) who actually worked with Harryhausen on some of his films. That in itself is why I love these so-called "bad" movies, that you so often find these brilliant artists involved at the very beginning of their careers. Of course, you just as often find all these fallen movie stars at the end of their careers. The up-shot is, if you're a movie lover (bad, good or indifferent), you really should check out this film. Just don't forget to take a cold shower after watching it. Memorable lines from the film: There aren't any.
  6. This trip is a real dream come true for me. I really would have loved to go to the Classic Film Festavile in Hollywood, but the trip was a little beyond my means. But, this trip is so wonderfully affordable. Will be flying out of Laguardia, and the flight with taxes/fees is only 229.00 round-trip. Amazing! It's definitely going to be a long 6 months to wait, but it'll be worth the wait to meet Robert & Ben, and hopefully some celebrities. I've never met a movie star before. What a thrill!
  7. Hobson's Choice Brigadoon Now Voyager Daddy Long Legs An Affair to Remember
  8. Hopper really was a fine actor, but as a human being it seems he was far more interesting than any character he ever played. He was a real personality, and someone who was very much in touch with his uniqueness, and that's what made him a good actor and a good artist. Because his career was seriously thriving over the past few years, getting some really good roles that allowed and served his uniqueness to come through. He was one of those actors that would always make what could be a very standard film and raise the film right out of its mediocrity, and make it a better film because he was in it. I'm thinking specifically about the film, "Land of the Dead" by George Romero. Not that it was a bad film, it was an OK film but it was a lot better because Hopper was in it and doing his Hopper thing. I also really liked him in "True Grit". He is only very briefly in that film, but it was definitely a scene that stuck in my memory long after seeing it. He just always made an interesting impression in every film he made. I agree that he was the last link with James Dean, but also one of the last links with the Actor's Studio. It's sad that so many of these great Actors Studio alumni are passing away, and won't be around to remind all of us Film addicts of that brilliant era during the 50's and early 60's when acting became so cathartic. RIP Mr. Hopper, we'll miss you.
  9. Don't let the cheesy title fool you. This is a very good film. It's one of a small handfull of films made in Great Britain in the late 50's early 60's that deal frankly with homosexuality (for example, see ?Victim? with Dirk Bogarde). Appropriately, for its time it's directed in a somewhat New Wave style, a la Truffeaut and Goddard. It was directed by Sidney J. Furie, perhaps best known for directing ?The Ipcress File? with Michael Caine (made right after this one) and for ?Lady Sings the Blues? in 1972. It has a strong Cinema Verite feeling. The young cast of actors are very natural in their style delivering performances that are believable and forthright. The teenage newlyweds, Reggie and Dot are realistically portrayed by Colin Cambell and Rita Tushingham (see Dr. Zhivago). The couple waste no time in proving to be much too immature for marriage. Abandoning his marriage, Reggie seeks the solace of his biker gang commrades. He is befriended by another biker boy, Pete, of whose homosexual inclinations, Reggie is completely oblivious. Many might say this naivete on Reggie?s part is beyond belief. How could it be possible for Reggie not to see Pete?s hausefrau manners as something vastly different than most straight guys. But that is assuming Reggie has some frame of reference for what a ?queer? is supposed to look like. The film makes it clear that all Reggie sees in Pete is another biker gang friend. And that doesn?t fit with Reggie?s homosexual frame of reference, likely an older, overtly effeminate man. The whole point of the film is to turn that stereotype on its ear, to show how far many gay men diverge from that stereotype. The only objection a critic might make is that Furie doesn?t go far enough. The film ends with Reggie rejecting Pete when it?s finally revealed that Pete is gay. The film leaves it up to the audience to decide whether Reggie himself is gay or not. The films ending is rather enigmatic, Reggie clearly has some soul searching to do before he decides on who is going to be his next love interest. Beyond this, however, Furie has definitely made an intriguing and thought-provoking movie, and very accessible to all no matter what gender you prefer.
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