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Mad66

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About Mad66

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  1. Now that you mention it ... you're right mrroberts! Edited by: Mad66 on Dec 27, 2013 4:05 PM
  2. James, in the radio *Madame Bovary* Rains played Monsieur Bovary - the poor neglected husband. Heflin was the lover.
  3. Tom, Rains did do that type of comedy in his early theatre days. He did a great deal of Shaw plays both in London and New York. In fact, Shaw himself sent him a note on his performance in his comedy *Misalliance* "My dear Mr. Rains, Must you be so very c-h-a-r-m-i-n-g as Joey Percival?" Rains never quite knew what to make of it (This from Skal's book and the Soister bio.) Even Mr. Skeffington has a wonderfully wry sense of humour, but you have to see *Angel on My Shoulder* to see Rains really enjoy himself in a truly comic role. Edited by: Mad66 on Dec 21, 2013 4:11 PM
  4. I have managed to read those chapters jamesjazzguitar, and agree with a comment by David Skal (Rains biographer) that their version doesn't sound very likely. (Rains was always known to be quite impeccable in his habits.) I'm sure Rains was disliked by many, as he could be quite haughty, and I think that influenced their story. I think many of the stories sound too much like what everyone wants to read about stars' hijinks -- especially those involving opening the dressing room door and catching people in various compromising situations. I mean, seriously -- you'd think people would lock the dressing room doors if they were going to get up to something Edited by: Mad66 on Dec 18, 2013 3:48 PM Edited by: Mad66 on Dec 18, 2013 3:59 PM
  5. I read in another thread that if you insert the name of the picture's URL between two exclamation points it will appear in your post. So here's what I did Tom. I realized that I had already added the photo on the TCM Classic Film Union site. I went to it and then clicked the Download Original Picture button which prepares the picture for copying by putting it on its own page. Then I copied that URL address and stuck it between two !'s. I was worried it wouldn't be big enough, but yikes ... it needs a scroll bar to get to the good part So now if I want to post again, I'll just make sure I add it first to CFU. Edited by: Mad66 on Dec 18, 2013 3:30 PM
  6. I have to share this behind-the-scenes shot of *Stolen Holiday* with my fellow Rains fans. It shows Michael Curtiz standing behind the camera directing Kay and Claude. It was the first of a dozen films Rains and Curtiz did together. Unlike many actors Rains got along with Curtiz (or perhaps knew how to cope with him ) As you must know, Claude was diminutive in stature (about 5'6") - something he shared with a lot of the great Warners stars - and Kay was tallish (especially with heels). If you look closely at his feet, you can see the boards he is standing on to look the same height as his bride. I figured out a way to post the photo - hope this works.
  7. I'd like to post an interesting behind-the-scenes photo that I have of *Stolen Holiday*, but it's not a URL but a JPEG file I've saved to my own computer. Can anyone tell me how can I post it here?
  8. I've just found out (from my January *Now Playing*) that TCM will be showing *Stolen Holiday* on January 13th. It was a thinly-veiled drama of the real-life Alexandre Stavisky affair (later a 1974 movie with Jean-Paul Belmondo and Charles Boyer). I agree with rosebette that it's a must-see for Rains fans - one of his best charming cads. (Why Kay Francis chose Ian Hunter, I'll never understand. ) It's also a rare gem in that it's only shown on TCM.
  9. A wonderful tribute Tom. As a Rains fan I have managed to see all of his films (it took a few years), and I can recommend a few other little gems that are often overlooked. *Angel On My Shoulder* featured Rains as a puckish Devil with a sense of humour, and his portrayal of producer David Belasco in *Lady With Red Hair* made it worth sitting through the rest of that movie. TCM sometimes plays *The Clairvoyant*, which features a warm and playful relationship between Rains and Fay Wray. His performance as Ann Todd's cuckolded husband in David Lean's *The Passionate Friends* is truly masterful. Although I always adore his suave and amoral cads (*Rope of Sand* comes to mind), it's great to see films like *Daughters Courageous* where he got to be truly charming. Easy to see why he had six wives, and why Bette Davis would have liked to have been 'more than friends'. Edited by: Mad66 on Dec 16, 2013 9:01 AM
  10. That is a very nice shot of him. Glad you took the effort to search for it.
  11. Make-up ... family ... Is it Warner Oland?
  12. It's gotta be my man Claude Rains! He could also be extremely sympathetic (Job Skeffington for instance), but when he was bad he was wonderful! His most unredeeming villain might just be his Don Luis in Anthony Adverse. He ends up killing BOTH Anthony's parents!
  13. > {quote:title=RayFaiola wrote:}{quote} > By the way, there are two Benny radio programs associated with HORN. One is his own program where Claude Rains guest stars to try and get out of appearing on the Ford Theater radio version of THE HORN BLOWS AT MIDNIGHT. The other is, of course, the Ford Theater broadcast. The latter is very funny, especially the opening scene where Benny - as Athaniel - keeps playing the wrong notes in the Celestial Orchestra's rehearsal of the Fifth Symphony. After the conductor balls him out mercilessly, Benny yells back "Oh, Mr. Beethoven, don't get so upset!" Very funny, but also with some post-war reflection that leads to the denoument (in place of the screen's rooftop finale). As a matter of fact, the Claude Rains excerpt of that Benny show is on the TCM CFU audio section. http://fan.tcm.com/_Jack-Benny-Radio-Show-Guest-Claude-Rains/audio/831548/66470.html
  14. I've read about them and wish I could hear those. I'm a huge Rains fan, and I've only been able to hear some of his radio work. Unfortunately all of his *Inner Sanctum* appearances seem to be lost.
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