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slaytonf

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Posts posted by slaytonf

  1. From the beginning of the series, it's been remarked the toll James Bond takes on women.  Though he never kills any, I believe, association with him often proves fatal.  Of course, he's responsible for the deaths of a lot of men, too, and quite directly.  But they are almost all bad guys who should expect as much considering their line of work.  I am led to wonder if anyone ever made a tally of the casualties.  I also wonder if the body count lessened over time, as misogyny levels tempered in Hollywood, or the fears of appearing so increased.

  2. If you go to the movie's TCM Database page, you will see a subheading under the picture.  One of them will be Articles & Reviews.  It may not be as extensive as on the old pages, I can't say, but it's something.  Here's an example from tonight's lineup:

    https://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/73717/duck-soup#articles-reviews

  3. No need.  Happy to oblige.  The Austin Healey makes surprisingly few appearances.  If you remember Patrick McGoohan's TV series Danger Man (one of TV's answers to James Bond), you'll find a couple of appearances.  And in Steve Martin's reprisal of Father of the Bride (1991).

    The MGA (twin cam used in Antiques Road Trip) also surprisingly shows up only in a handful of assorted European movies too obscure to mention individually.  I give only the IMCDB page:

    https://www.imcdb.org/vehicles.php?make=MG&model=A+Twin+Cam&modelMatch=1&modelInclModel=on

    • Thanks 1
  4. The Antiques Road Trip has started a new season.  At least on YouTube.  It shows the effect of the Corona Age.  No longer do the two contesting antiques experts shake hands with shop proprietors on meeting them or concluding a sale.  Everyone keeps a safe distance.  Auctions are all on line or by phone, which is a drawback.  You loose the ambience of a roomful of people and the antiques experts efforts to massage the crowd, a big part of the show's fun.  Bidding for objects feels mechanical, despite the efforts of the contenders to pep it up following the auction on personal tablets.  Lost also is the banter as they drive the English countryside between towns.  An advantage is that is they each have their own transportation, providing twice the opportunity for nice cars:

    MGA:

    280px-MG_A_1600_Roadster_white_vr.jpg

    Austin Healey:

    5b6a61b698c8db11f7efcde3-large.jpg?cache

     

    • Like 2
  5. 9 hours ago, SansFin said:

    I have seen many posts over the years which bewail the lack of movies to recognize special days or certain aspects of honor or celebration on those days. It is my turn now.

    I could find no movie on today's schedule which supports either the six basic tenets of International Men's Day or this year's specific theme: health.

    I feel that this is a gross oversight. It does seem to me that the men at TCM should have packed the schedule so as to raise awareness of the issues involved.

     

    What's that bulge in your cheek?  I know you don't chew tobacco.  I know, it's your tongue. 

    • Like 1
  6. Hey! don't crash out so quick!  I'm always interested in what people get jazzed about in movies.  They are an endless source of fascination, and other people's enthusiasm contributes to mine.  I'll also turn you on to a valuable website.  It's the Internet Movie Car Database, or IMCDB.org.  It has for all but the most obscure movies, exhaustive identifications of all moving vehicles (except trains and planes, I think).  That's what I rely on when I'm watching a movie and something rolls across the screen and I say:  Hey! that's a nice car! 

    Next time that happens to you, post it.  I'd like to know what you think is a nice car.

    2014?  Six years?  Omigosh.

  7. The Lady Vanishes (1938), with a super cast--Margaret Lockwood, Michael Redgrave, Dame May Witty, Paul Lukas--is one of Hitchcock's most entertaining movies.  I highly recommend it.  It starts out clunkily with an opening sequence that has attempts at humor that cross into the annoying, but once on the train, well, it moves forward at a fast clip.

    Vertigo (1958) is not at all a typical Hitchcock movie.  In fact, it is an exact mirror of one.  There is no McGuffin, no falsely accused protagonist.  The movie is character driven, not plot driven.  While character study plays a role in other of his movies, it is there to serve the plot.  Here it is the plot.  The contrived and frankly implausible murder scheme serves as a pretext for examining Scotty and Madeleine/Judy's sick obsessions and how they interplay.

  8. Below is a screenshot of the TCM database page for The Greatest Show on Earth (1952):

    Untitled.png

    You will see under the picture the various links to different parts of the database page for the movie.  One of them is SYNOPSIS.  Click on it and you will get an exhaustive description of the plot.

  9. In the upper right hand corner of the TCM.com homepage, there is a magnifying glass.  Clicking on it will open a search bar.  You can then type in the movie title, or the name of a person.  It will present a menu of options to click on.  Choose the one that is your movie, or person, and it will take you to the TCMdatabase page for it/them.

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