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slaytonf

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Posts posted by slaytonf

  1.  

    Unbeknownst to me, I live in a corner of the universe where OBC is unavailable. So, not only has the chance to remove the one lifelong thorn in my psyche passed me by, I was not even aware of the opportunity I missed. Now I feel all bad. (And no, I am not going to drive up to Los Angeles at midnight on a Saturday night to see it. You can't even get me up there during the day.) Let me know how it turns out. Here's a guess: the monster dies. I wonder if there's a movie where the monster wins?

     

     

  2. Yes, yes. But be generous. You might be just as confused if you woke up 100 million years after you were supposed to be extinct. The image in my mind is of a long neck and the small, light figure sliding to the rear of the mouth. But it is the dim memory of a small child seen on the screen of a Black and White TV with rabbit ear antennas in the days of broadcast analog signals. If Gorgo turns up anywhere, I will take the opportunity of watching it.

  3. I do not much like the remake, but because Jane Greer was in it, I recorded it, as I do all her movies. Something has always nagged me as I watched it in the past (not all the way through, but different parts), and I discovered what it was. James Mason should have played Michael, not Rupert. He lacks the light, careless touch needed for the amoral blacksheep opportunist that Rupert is, and has the drawling, polished exterior, with the undercurrent of danger required for MIchael. Imagining him like that, he would have given Raymond Massey a run for his money. For Rupert? Gilbert Roland?

     

    As for Madeleine Carroll. I do not believe I have seen a woman appear in a film as lovely as she appeared in this one.

  4. Yes, this is the distressingly common portrayal of women in all movies of this period. It occurs in these kinds of movies, too. Frankly, it bores me. And it's one reason why I don't watch them more than once, if at all. But there is this theme which runs through these films of accomplished, competent women, who are more than the pretext for heroics on the part of the male lead, and who don't degenerate into squeally hysterics, or any of the other tired, obsolete, outdated, overused, outworn, tiring, stereotypes.

     

    So what is the connection between Miracle and Them?

  5. I am done trying to insert quotes into my replies. If someone can't figure out what I am referring to, I'll have to live with that.

     

    As for the 20K beast, I would have had no trouble keeping up a constant patter of comments á la MST3K while the film was playing. In fact, I did.

  6. Re: RayFaiola

     

     

    That show was for crummy movies. BEAST FROM 20,000 FATHOMS is an outstanding film for its genre. As was THIS ISLAND EARTH, which MST3K DID pillory in its theatrical feature. Feh.

     

    {font:Arial, Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif} It may have been outstanding for its genre, but I would have had no trouble keeping up a constant patter of comments on the film á la MST3K while it was running. In fact, I did. {font}

  7. <{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}Your best bet is to do a search all forums for the particular subject (movie title, actor, etc). There is not much discipline on these boards, many posters only use the top main message boards.

     

    It may have been outstanding for its genre, but I could have easily kept up a constant patter of comments á la MST3K while it was showing. In fact, I did. {font}

  8. >That show was for crummy movies. BEAST FROM 20,000 FATHOMS is an outstanding film for its genre. As was THIS ISLAND EARTH, which MST3K DID pillory in its theatrical feature. Feh.

     

    It may have been outstanding for its genre, but I would have had no trouble keeping up a constant patter of comments on the film á la MST3K while it was running. In fact, I did.

     

    Edited by: slaytonf on Jun 24, 2011 9:53 PM

     

     

     

    Edited by: slaytonf on Jun 24, 2011 9:55 PM

  9. None of the movies tonight was the one from the murk of my past. I only remember one scene. The monster, a brontosaur-like, or is it now apatosaur, or brachiosaur? Anyway. It comes upon an isolated croft in a wild and storm-wracked landscape, perhaps by the sea; in it living a solitary old woman. It snatches her out of it and swallows her, whole. The only image I have is of her sliding into the creatures gullet. Ah well, I suppose I will have to reconcile myself to living with this mystery, and move on.

  10. Generally, when i make a point, I avoid repeating it. But in this instance, I think this merits it. Kent Douglass was decades ahead of his time in the way he acted. He didn't pose or declaim, he simply spoke the lines, as if he were talking. He had an unfortunately stunted career, but you can see more of his work in the Cukor edition of Little Women. TCM doesn't usually show any of his other films, but Daybreak is coming up July, 21. Perhaps his style was derived from the stage of the period. After all this was the thick of the modern era of stage drama.

     

    Whale managed to put some of his magic into the film, especially with the opening shot, which has a little bit of visual wit in it, playing a neat trick on the viewers as we fly down to the stage from the balcony, we think we are zooming in on the star of the show. But the camera moves past her, trailing along the line of chorus girls to finally stop on Mae Clark. Nicely orchestrated. This and other shots show this was not a low budget picture.

     

    The film does suffer from staginess, a common drawback of most films taken from stage plays.

  11. Sorry to make you sad. The suddenness of my reply is only apparent, not real. The structure of the message boards doesn't make it possible to document the process of deciding to reply or the development of the wording.

     

    If a line is a favorite, then it implies that there is something great or meaningful about it, otherwise it would not be a favorite, as you yourself demonstrated.

     

    I didn't know there was a formal rule in this thread about not commenting on the submissions, but if that is the sentiment, I will go along with it. I can see how if people comment on lines, and comment on comments, the thread might degenerate.

     

    These days, a lot that is crass and vulgar is valued because it is crass and vulgar. Even though the line has significance in the movie, isn't it just cussing? I'm not looking for Shakespeare in every line, but something. Of course, there's Robert Redford's line in Butch Cassidy. And that's a great line.

  12. Hm. It seems that just when I learned how to do that quote-in-a-white-box thing, they went ahead and changed the reply box format. Let's see if this works. . . .

     

    >kriegerg69

    {font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}>"YOU SICK, TWISTED F***!!!" ]:)

    >James Caan (to Kathy Bates)

    *>Misery (1990)*

    {font}

     

    What's so great about that line?

  13. It's interesting to see the different interpretations people have of films. hotmale.com sees the acting as dated, while the reason I like this version it precisely because of the "modern" style of acting in it, especially that of Kent Douglass. It is a more informal, conversational style. You see it sometimes--rarely in early thirties movies, like Guilty Hands, or A Free Soul; and then sometimes only in parts of a film. The strict imposition of the production code seems to have snuffed out this fragile element of filmmaking. It doesn't reappear until the end of the code era in the middle to late sixties.

     

    I'll admit Mae Clarke's acting is a little stiff, like it always was. Don't get me wrong, I like Mae Clarke, and I watch all the films she's in whenever they come on, even if I don't like the film. But I have to say she isn't a great, or even a good actress. People may think she was just being a good sport for saying she had no ill feelings about the legacy of the scene with James Cagney in Public Enemy, and was actually grateful because it was a source of steady work for her, but I think it was an accurate assessment.

     

    As an aside, it's nice to see Bette Davis in an early role, even though there's nothing exceptional about it, or her performance, but still, it's nice to see her.

  14. And I have the feeling that it will be a long time before this film will show up again. Oh well, at least I have I Know Where I'm Going and The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp.

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