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FilmAficionado

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Everything posted by FilmAficionado

  1. Nelson Eddy was in *Rosalie* with Eleanor Powell
  2. I'm not correcting you, just clarifying. That was such a surprising scene! First, Gypsy slaps Ruby (Harlow) across the face. Then, in an instant, instinctive reaction, Ruby gives Gypsy a left fist to the chin, sending her to the floor. Two women, one slap, one punch, two seconds, that's all it is. But whoa, it took my breath away!
  3. There is no "X" surname, so can I slide with Xavire Cugat in *Weekend at the Waldorf* ?
  4. And if I'm correct it had to be either Johnny Carson or David Suskind, since you said it was a late-night talk show; but I'll go with Carson.
  5. Don't tell me it was Judy Garland and someone asked her to sing Over the Rainbow in the toilet?
  6. Lee J. Cobb as Johnny Friendly in *On the Waterfront*. That's easy to come to mind since it's on right now, as I type .
  7. Awnser: Elsa Lanchester in *Bell, Book and Candle*. You've got the spirit of the thing, Lavender, thanks. Clue: She's Mrs. Hamilton in this perennial Christmas Favorite with Cary Grant, Loretta Young and David Niven.
  8. I should have said Florence Bates in *I Remember Mama*. Now, anyone want to name the actress and film in the Norma Shearer movie?
  9. *Answer*: Florence Bates *Clue*: Norma Shearer's wise mother in this Clare Boothe Luce play-come-movie in 1939. Get the idea? Anyone interested?
  10. *Answer*: Anne Revere *Clue*: Matronly author whom Irene Dunne consults to help her daughter's career as a writer. Louella Parson's daughter Hariett produced this film.
  11. This is my favorite part of this site: trivia. It's just a lot of fun. So many original and fun ones here, guys! Most of us know many of the leading actors/actresses. It's the supporting ones that are sometimes challenging. Right now I am concentrating on older women, most of whom inevitably played mothers and the like. Few of these women won awards. Most never played leading roles. Very often they were accomplished English stage actresses before coming to Hollywood in the '30s and '40s. They played the same kind of roles over and over. I can think of a dozen without trying hard, and I'm sure there are many more. I love these women! Here's my trivia game idea. I thought I'd run this idea up the pole and see if anyone here salutes: Briefly describe the character and the movie as the clue. Then, someone name the actress and the movie. I'll give a few examples to see if I can get some brains moving in the direction I'm thinking about. If this proves to be fun for anyone we can next do men of the same age and type. Then, children. Okay, here goes: *Clue*: Bette Davis' tyrannical mother who causes her nervous breakdown *Answer*: Gladys Cooper in *Now, Voyager* *Clue*: Katherine Hepburn's Aunt in this often-remade movie. She pretends to be mean but is kind to her family. *Answer*: Edna May Oliver in *Little Women* 1933 I'll do a couple more in context, to give the idea... *Clue*: Strict but kind mother of 12-year-old Elizabeth Taylor. The role that sent Miss Taylor into stardom.
  12. This is my favorite part of this site: trivia. It's just a lot of fun. So many original and fun ones here, guys! Most of us know many of the leading actors/actresses. It's the supporting ones that are sometimes challenging. Right now I am concentrating on older women, most of whom inevitably played mothers and the like. Few of these women won awards. Most never played leading roles. Very often they were accomplished English stage actresses before coming to Hollywood in the '30s and '40s. They played the same kind of roles over and over. I can think of a dozen without trying hard, and I'm sure there are many more. I love these women! Here's my trivia game idea. I thought I'd run this idea up the pole and see if anyone here salutes: Briefly describe the character and the movie as the clue. Then, someone name the actress and the movie. I'll give a few examples to see if I can get some brains moving in the direction I'm thinking about. If this proves to be fun for anyone we can next do men of the same age and type. Then, children. Okay, here goes: *Clue*: Bette Davis' tyrannical mother who causes her nervous breakdown *Answer*: Gladys Cooper in *Now, Voyager* *Clue*: Katherine Hepburn's Aunt in this often-remade movie. She pretends to be mean but is kind to her family. *Answer*: Edna May Oliver in *Little Women* 1933 I'll do a couple more in context... *Clue*: Famous, matronly author whom Irene Dunne consults to help her daughter's career as a writer.
  13. This is my favorite part of this site: trivia. It's just a lot of fun and I like to concentrate and stretch my brain! So many original and fun games here, guys! Most of us know many of the leading actors/actresses. It's the supporting ones that are sometimes challenging. Right now I am concentrating on older women, most of whom inevitably played mothers and the like. Few of these women won awards. Most never played leading roles. Very often they were accomplished English stage actresses before coming to Hollywood in the '30s and '40s. They played the same kind of roles over and over. I can think of a dozen without trying hard, and I'm sure there are many more. I love these women! Here's my trivia game idea. I thought I'd run this idea up the pole and see if anyone here salutes: Briefly describe the character and the movie as the clue. Then, someone name the actress and the movie. I'll give a few examples to see if I can get some brains moving in the direction I'm thinking about. It isn't just "old women": Ethel Barymore wouldn't count because she played mostly leading roles. If this proves to be fun for anyone we can next do men of the same age and type. Then, children. Okay, here goes: *Clue*: Bette Davis' tyrannical mother who causes her nervous breakdown *Answer*: Gladys Cooper in *Now, Voyager* *Clue*: Katherine Hepburn's Aunt in this often-remade movie. She pretends to be mean but is kind to her family. *Answer*: Edna May Oliver in *Little Women* 1933 I'll do a couple more in context... *Clue*: Famous, matronly author whom Irene Dunne consults to help her daughter's career as a writer.
  14. Hint: The decisive factor is the gaden all right, but WHO is in the garden. He really couldn't care less about cherry pies.
  15. Tonight there are 4 (count 'em), FOUR Harlow films on tonight! There are many classic Horlow flicks I'm sure *Red-Headed Woman* *Three Wise Girls* *Riffraff* *Suzy* And if that were not enough, after that, two more great films: Chaplin's classic *City Lights* where Harlow is an extra Then George Bernard Shaw's *Pygmalion* with Wendy Hiller and Leslie Howard Can I stay awake until 5:00 a.m.? For those who despise Jean Harlow and are eager to tell me so, instead try doing what I do when I don't care for TCM's evening lineup: watch CNN and find out what's happening in the world today. Or, read a book. People used to read books at home for entertainment and education before TV and radio. I still do it, even though it's an antiquated activity.
  16. > {quote:title=irishboy wrote:}{quote} > This is the third airing in the last two months. > > Too many repeats. I know how you feel. It seems like that to me sometimes too. But in defence of TCM they show the same movies on different days, all different times of the day and in the wee hours of the morning. In say, a one month period, they'll show the same movie three times. The first time might be 8:00 p.m. Thursday. The second 2:00 a.m. next Wednesday, the third 3:00 p.m. the following Sunday. That's good. It gives everyone a chance to see it at a time that fits in with their TV-watching schedule. Often I have to miss a movie I really want to see that is on first in prime time, if I'm unable to be home to watch it. But I'll be able to see it a week or two later in the morning or afternoon, and I'm happy!
  17. > {quote:title=Arturo wrote:}{quote} > You reminded me of a scene from ALL ABOUT EVE, as Margot Chandler snapped when Bill Sampson stated "You're mixing your metaphors": > "I'll mix what I like!" Now you're talking my language! That was a good quote from a great movie. Do we both like *All About Eve*? Surly there must be common ground between us. Can we discuss what we agree upon and skip what we disagree? I have no doubt I could learn from you and I hope I might say something you find interesting. My main goal here is to make friends with like-minded movie lovers. Arguing is counterproductive on both sides, a waste of time for us and the others in the group who are subjected to it. I apologize for anything I said that you objected to. We both need to be more considerate of each others' feelings. I'm willing to try if you are. BTW, Bette Davis' character is "Margo Channing," not "Margo Chandler." Now that wasn't so difficult to hear, was it?
  18. > The film is deliberately about as claustrophobic as you can get. That's a large part of the film. Myself being claustrophobic, the most difficult movie to sit through is *Ace in the Hole* with Kirk Douglas and Jan Sterling. Set in the mountains of New Mexico, Richard Benedict, as Sterling's husband "Leo," is searching for ancient Indian artifacts in caves. It's very dangerous work but with big payoffs. Suddenly there is a big cave-in. Throughout the entire movie (and many days) Leo is pinned under debris deep inside, in the dark, injured and with little air. Now THAT gave me the heebie-jeebies!
  19. Again, "genug ist genug!" You admit having problems with English so I'll explain. That means "enough already!" or "no more!" in German. Literally: "enough is enough!" You're trying your best to push my buttons, but sorry, I won't bite. Oh, god, now you have me mixing metaphors...
  20. What you just described is sometimes called "camp." I don't think anyone is expected to really take *Baby Jane* seriously. I laugh every time I watch it, that's its intention. No, it's not a straight-out comedy. Its humor is cerebral and tongue-in-cheek. I doubt if anyone laughed at twenty-five-year-old Miss Davis when she played a horrible shrew in *Of Human Bondage*. Or twenty-six-year-old Joan Crawford as a prostitute in *Rain*. Those were completely different types of movies. (I throughly enjoined both movies, BTW). Dame Maggie Smith is 77 and still working. No "camp" for her! It's just isn't her style. And Dame Smith is one of my favorite actresses. Some people like "camp," some don't. I always thought *Baby Jane* was a hoot! Same goes with *Hush, Hush Sweet Charlotte*. I too would be delighted if TCM were to show any 1930s double feature with a Bette Davis and a Joan Crawford film. What the hell, make it several double features, all day long! I'm not trying to talk you into liking something that I like and you don't. I respect your taste and understand your objections. Now I'm explaining my point of view. As I say over and over in this forum: "To each his own!"
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