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CaveGirl

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Everything posted by CaveGirl

  1. I rate "The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer" as a 10 every time I see it, TB!
  2. I always want to enter movies which feature appealing dens of iniquity, like the opium den-ish joint in "The Letter". When Bette Davis enters that Oriental room with all the wind chimes pealing out sounds of warning, to meet up with Hammond's spooky wife [as played by Gale Sondergaard] the whole place just reeks of atmosphere. I feel a good den of iniquity should have some red light habituees, a roue or two, interesting lighting, and possibly Nazimova in full costume. Of course some here might have a more ruffian vision of what their favorite den of iniquity should resemble, and that's fine to
  3. This is crapola, Dargo! Not your post...or your inimitable humour [yes...that would be spelled with the essential second "u"] but the idea of you being a tennis addict. For years, all we've heard is that you look like James Coburn, but now my image of you is of a youthful Humphrey Bogart, bounding into the TCM Lizard Lounge and shouting out the words "Tennis, anyone?" I just don't see Coburn looking right in his tennis togs. Clean up this mess. Do you look more like Coburn or Bogie? P.S. Did some research on if Bogart really said that line or something like it on stage, and the jur
  4. Now that's scary! Too bad you don't have a tape of it that you could submit to that new show on the Travel Channel called "Paranormal". Thanks, Janet!
  5. I so totally agree with you, Arpirose. I usually am going way back in time, to the silents and Depression and war years for these forgotten classics, but there are even much more recent films which seem to be forgotten that I remember fondly like "Being John Malkovitch", "M. Butterfly" and even the controversial Jean-Luc Godard film, "Hail Mary". Great topic to ponder...
  6. Seen it, love it and it reminds me of "In the Realm of the Senses" where some folks almost kill themselves doing something else enjoyable. Thanks, CigarJoe!
  7. I was going to mention the TZ episode, as it's one of my faves. The way it starts out [SPOILERS AHEAD] with everyone dealing with heatstroke and thirst and then the denouement with the opposite effect of freezing almost to oblivion, is so fantastic. I also enjoy all those burning up paintings which look hot even in black and white. Yes, Garde really had many fine roles in her career and thanks, Swithin!
  8. The term MacGuffins, coined supposedly by a screenwriter of Hitchcock's named MacPhail, is the basis of many a progression in films. Just yesterday I watched "The Cat Burglar", directed by cult icon, William Witney. This tasty little crime caper had a MacGuffin in the form of stolen espionage papers which also seemed to take a page out of the handbook of Ophuls, with an item passing through many hands, like a pair of invaluable earrings.The stolen notebook went from a pretty blonde's briefcase, to the cat burglar's lair, to holding up a dresser leg [at least a few pages], to the trash heap and
  9. The middle person is Luis Bunuel, to the Hitchcock's right. He was one of Hitch's favorite directors that he admired.
  10. It's lividity. She was probably in a more face down position when found which would reflect how the blood pooled. Can you tell I kept the forensic book from a policeman that I dated???
  11. That must have been a real feather in her cap, Dargo.
  12. Films or tv shows which focus on the culinary arts are always suberbly filling fare. I was going to say my favorite was Malle's "My Dinner With Andre" but then realized that though Andre and Wallace were being served constantly during their conversation, I don't remember any of the gastronomic delights or even the wine, just mostly the conversation. So I shall say that my favorite outing on this subject is actually an "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" episode called "The Speciality of the House" written by the talented Stanley Ellin, and starring the exquisitely talented Robert Morley. Now for
  13. Speaking of feminist film criticism, I remember thinking once while viewing Rubens' "Rape of the Sabine Women" at the National Gallery in London, that none of the ladies seemed to be singing or dancing as they were in "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers".
  14. Well, to begin with I'm sorry I missed this thread originally, Dargo. Now, on to business, if you are wondering who this lady reminds me of, I would say the most likely actress is...Ethel Griffies. Now she does have some resemblance also to the Una O'Connor school with a bit of Hermione Gingold and Mildred Natwick mixed in, but wasn't she really a landlady or something? Hope I've answered your question properly? P.S. She also could be a relative of Estelle Winwood!
  15. Oh, okay I must have missed your question so will go look for it now.
  16. Speaking of Slim, I found an old 45 at a garage sale the other day, of his song "Rainin' in my Heart" [not to be confused with the Buddy Holly penned song]. I wonder if it is worth anything? I think "Stormy Weather" by the Five Keys is no longer so in demand.
  17. Superlative drama with realistic leads.
  18. Thanks, TopBilled! I wonder if all things can just be boiled down to three categories, Envy, Love, Revenge?
  19. Extra points awarded for mentioning the "Aarne-Thompson Folklore classification system" whose rules I revere and live by, Sgt. Markoff! Okay, I lied, since I didn't really know about the A-TFCS but don't mind admitting my nescience and I like to learn new things, so shall be immediately researching the above word of mouth folklore connection! A lot of the criticism of this author's contention, lies within the proposition of the earlier theories about dramatic situations utilized in plays and such. With the usage of the archetypes as a basis to categorize such, I can see why there was suc
  20. I like stories about Benny's friendship with George Burns, who seemed to delight in tormenting him. One I kind of remember was told by Burns, saying he and Jack were on their way to a funeral of someone, and George said to Jack, "You know, it would be very bad if you laughed during the eulogy." Of course, one can imagine the result without me saying anything more.
  21. Where's Rochester in all this? I think he would have added to the cast of "Anatomy of a Murder" if they'd only given him a part. Darg, do you agree with my above contention that Dwayne Hickman [as Dobie Gillis] also does a mean Jack Benny as teenager imitation?
  22. Don't feel badly, sixhalfdozen! I can relate and I agree with you, but I have an even more off the wall Jack Benny comparison. I've always thought Dwayne Hickman, in his Dobie Gillis persona, is doing an impression of Jack Benny, particularly in his movements and expressions. I'm sure now someone will say I am the "only one" who thinks that also. But I don't think any actors have done a Roy Cohn or Joseph McCarthy imitation on screen that is up to par with the reality of their HUAC personas.
  23. That episode is a riot. I think it is Betty Garde who plays the maid from hell! Her comebacks to Ralphie Boy's rants are priceless.
  24. Hey, Darg...bizarrely I caught some movie over the weekend, called "Pumpkin" from 2002 I think, which had the earliest incarnation on film of McCarthy I've ever seen. Her friend, Christina Ricci was trying to set her up on a date, with a guy Ricci was training for the Special Olympics. I can't even describe this plot so will just give the online synopsis, and I'd love to hear anyone else's opinion of this rather odd film. "A sorority girl finds her life falling apart after she develops romantic feelings for a mentally-challenged man."
  25. A book came out awhile back, contending that there are only seven basic plot lines in Western literature. I don't remember if this theory included all branches of world literature, but my question to you is, do you think this is also true of movies? The seven categories consist of: Overcoming the Master, Rags to Riches, The Quest, Voyage and Return, Comedy, Tragedy and Rebirth. Apparently the author, in a rather Cosmic Consciousness Carl Jungian way developed this exegesis over many years, though some critics find it not feasible or with sufficient proofs. I think the author also had som
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