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ThatGingerAnna

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About ThatGingerAnna

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  1. After cinematography, set design and production are two of my favorite things about films in general and films noir in particular. In this scene, we get to know Lydecker through his furnishings and his own short narration, before we see him or understand his role in the film. When we are first introduced to the character he is unclothed and bathing, very much vulnerable. The detective invades his privacy symbolically by touching his belongings and physically by seeing him in the bath. Lydecker is more vulnerable as the scene progresses and even shows the detective his entire body at one point.
  2. I see film noir as a movement (a reaction to/reflection of cultural shifts) and style (cinematic tendencies and patterns in films with different narrative styles), but not a genre until later (when the films are purposefully created as films noir). The cynicism and defeat present in many films noir go hand-in-hand with post war cultural and psychological shifts. Both women, who lost the independence they had during the war, and men, mentally wounded in the war, craved different types of entertainment and film noir seems to have been the perfect reflection of this collective postwar disenchantm
  3. This is one of the first films noir I ever saw (without the knowledge that it was film noir). I caught it in the middle and I remember thinking the POV camerawork was not a good fit for the film. Today, after seeing the opening scene, I still don't care for the first person POV and don't think it was successful. The use of first person POV is innovative in an of itself and besides the stabilization I do think it was done well (especially the change in elevation of the camera when Bogart is scaling the fence and entering the car). That being said, I love that the film features internal dialog
  4. I wasn't as much shocked as intrigued by this opening scene. As far as important contributions to the genre, there are many. This is an excellent intro because it means the audience already knows the end result of the conflict. The writers and director are tasked with telling the story and keeping the audience's attention even when they know the outcome. This could be the end of a long drawn out event that we've yet to see or this could be the middle of the story where the writers must explain why this happened as well as show the audience what happens after. Several other things seem to be im
  5. I wasn't as much shocked as intrigued by this opening scene. As far as important contributions to the genre, there are many. This is an excellent intro because it means the audience already knows the end result of the conflict. The writers and director are tasked with telling the story and keeping the audience's attention even when they know the outcome. This could be the end of a long drawn out event that we've yet to see or this could be the middle of the story where the writers must explain why this happened as well as show the audience what happens after. Several other things seem to be im
  6. This scene definitely set an anxious tone for the start of the movie. The overwhelming audio (although devoid of dialogue) and unsteady camerawork created an idea that a collision was just around the corner-the audience is left waiting for that collision (literally or symbolically) to happen later in the film. While I haven't watched many films noir, the dependence of this scene on audio and camera techniques with almost zero input from actors to evoke emotion, seems pioneering for this film. While yesterday's film also employed camera angles and audio to evoke emotion, acting was irreplaceabl
  7. This scene definitely set an anxious tone for the start of the movie. The overwhelming audio (although devoid of dialogue) and unsteady camerawork created an idea that a collision was just around the corner-the audience is left waiting for that collision (literally or symbolically) to happen later in the film. While I haven't watched many films noir, the dependence of this scene on audio and camera techniques with almost zero input from actors to evoke emotion, seems pioneering for this film. While yesterday's film also employed camera angles and audio to evoke emotion, acting was irreplaceabl
  8. Several things intrigued me about the opening scenes. The camera angle looking over the children as they play, rather than from their point of view, establishes a somewhat paternalistic/voyeuristic mood. The sparseness of sound within the courtyard is also interesting. The only sound you hear is the echo of the children's song-no wind, no birds, no ambient noise at all until the woman on the balcony yell's for them to stop. Her warning also made me feel that she had a personal connection to the events in the song. It wasn't plain annoyance, but rather terror in her voice. Again in the last sce
  9. Several things intrigued me about the opening scenes. The camera angle looking over the children as they play, rather than from their point of view, establishes a somewhat paternalistic/voyeuristic mood. The sparseness of sound within the courtyard is also interesting. The only sound you hear is the echo of the children's song-no wind, no birds, no ambient noise at all until the woman on the balcony yell's for them to stop. Her warning also made me feel that she had a personal connection to the events in the song. It wasn't plain annoyance, but rather terror in her voice. Again in the last sce
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