Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

souzakh

Members
  • Content Count

    4
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About souzakh

  • Rank
    Newbie
  1. Can't believe I have never seen this film....can't wait until Friday! gun shot shatters the night white (innocent) bird in flight man stumbles down the stairs bette fires with a blank stare worker shadowed behind bars moonlight out and leaves the stars moon shines again in accusing blaze workers arrive in a daze bette is calm with a plan in mind an so the plot begins to wind
  2. With so many great posts and ideas from so many in this course...I'll only add that I was struck by the following: The two men were part of the great machine - men to engine to train to its movement through the landscape...all one seamless machine. Felt a constant state of dread and fear as the train entered each tunnel, crossed each trestle, whizzed by the platforms. Finally, trains, especially ones clipping along at this pace always give me a sense of escape...escape to where and why and who?
  3. I just checked out the resource http://www.filmnoirstudies.com/ and read the essay no place for a woman. It provides great insight Into film the war in the role that women and families play and the plots. Check it out…http://www.filmnoirstudies.com/essays/no_place.asp In a disturbing scene from Dark Passage (1947), a back alley plastic surgeon tells Vincent Parry (Humphrey Bogart), "There's no such thing as courage. There's only fear, the fear of getting hurt and the fear of dying. That's why human beings live so long." He is looking straight at Parry and — through the use of the subjective camera — straight at the audience. His statement is especially striking because it dismisses courage as a myth soon after World War II, rejecting a basic cultural belief that all of America and all of Hollywood had just spent four years trying to build up. Such an attack on society's (and Hollywood's) most cherished values is characteristic of film noir, and perhaps its favorite target is the most fundamental value of all — the family.
  4. The assumed killer's shadow looming over the little girl in front of the Wanted Poster. While there is no face on the poster he boldly adds his profile directly to the poster for anyone who cares to "see." All be will be revealed when I see the movie this Friday but I dare say the girl never made it home for lunch.
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...