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Sabina

Members
  • Content Count

    5
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  • Last visited

About Sabina

  • Rank
    Newbie

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://silverembers.com

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    London, UK
  • Interests
    Surrealism, films, History and everything Classic Hollywood.
  1. Marlowe is impulsive, fast and opposed to the more controlled detectives we have seen until now. He knows that women are not always the damsel in distress so treats everyone as a suspect, getting straight to the point by grabbing Grayle, opening her bag, demanding the truth and interrogating her. Ask questions now, go with gut instinct and do not waste time because you may be too late.
  2. We begin with the statue, a virtuous symbol of religion and superstition and hear the continuous tick of the clock. The room filled with tribal masks and mirrors, mirrors that show us what we want to see any reflect all that we don't. That slow, steady narration envelops us as the pendulum slowly sways in the Grandfather clock. The tick, a reminder of time that has passed and of uncertain futures is the heartbeat of the room, a signal of life and death, past and future. The gentle motion of the camera - low and steady - as it gently tracks through the room until we reach the detective. The roo
  3. Dark Passage: POV and Bogie's narration allow us into the character's mind. He is not alone. We are running with him.
  4. I love the use of both music and moonlight in The Letter. How the drip from tree to pale evolves into music to chatter as the camera pans from left to right and from up down to up. Then we hear the gunshot and the calm stillness changes to a faster pace and a panicked chatter. However, my favourite part of this opening is the use of the moonlight. As Davis shoots the moon is out. Then it conceals her with a passing cloud - as if it is protecting her, shielding her and wanting to keep her hidden. The cloud then vanishes and she is exposed brighter and more visible than before. She is illuminate
  5. The whole scene is very evocative and a lot happens in the space of four minutes. The close-ups of wheels, chimney smoke and camera positioning create the impression of intimacy, importance, intensity and excitement. Sound is prioritised over dialogue - a very effective technique - implies intensity and importance, culminating when the train arrives at the station. Meanwhile, train/tunnels have a deeply rooted, Freudian meaning, linking the films and the Noir genre, to deeper psychological issues.
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