Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

winonaww

Members
  • Content Count

    5
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About winonaww

  • Rank
    Newbie
  1. I'm sure some viewers here have noticed that Gilda is more or less the same film as Casablanca, save the country and, of course, the actors, the nightclub, especially, as a microcosm for the outside world of violence and deception. However, Glenn Ford is no Bogart, nor Hayworth, as an actor, Bergman. But Hayworth works the glamour the way Bergman worked the self-sacrificing sincerity. Another important difference is the nearly manic obsession Ford has with Hayworth—and we see this in this scene. Although this is a scene in which close-ups do invite the viewer to identify with Hayworth, thi
  2. Hm m m m . . . I'm not sure I liked the shifts in point of view, but once Daves established the first person point of view when the voice-over kicked in and the camera work moved along with it, it was fine—what would have happened had the director added a few seconds and had the main character peeking up over the barrel, the barrel tipping and rolling, and then our seeing the lettering when Bogart is out of it? The interrogations by the driver were very effective in building suspense. We don't really want to identify with the escaped, possibly wife-murderer, but we do and hope he surviv
  3. The Age of Industry, which is what brought us cinema, is epitomized by the steam engine, economically and socially and, by mechanized factories and the rail road train; one keeps people at home, working, the other provides figurative as well as literal motion. Train tracks symbolize movement, relentless, almost unstoppable movement—"Once you get on the train, and there's no getting off." The heat of the engine—an inferno-like image that draws the viewer in, fearfully, begins the film, suggesting a self-destructive, consuming event, psychological or literal. The train and its tracks also pro
  4. The words? "Tense" and "airless." Also, "detached." Here is my original post—I posted elsewhere, first: Lang keeps an unusually angled distance from his subject in the beginning shots of 'M.' The near-circle of the young girls also is off-kilter and not quite right; a couple of children are outliers, watching but not participating. The visual elements are angular and vaguely reminiscent of those early silent films, such as "Dr. Calgari." The film is not only without "normal" assortments of people, but almost airless and stifling, here—not until we visit the laundress's kitchen does that
  5. Lang keeps an unusually angled distance from his subject in the beginning shots of 'M.' The near-circle of the young girls also is off-kilter and not quite right; a couple of children are outliers, watching but not participating. The visual elements are angular and vaguely reminiscent of those early silent films, such as "Dr. Calgari." The film is not only without "normal" assortments of people, but almost airless and stifling, here—not until we visit the laundress's kitchen does that change. Sounds accumulate but never quite mimic a realistic environment (not that any film really does, bu
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...