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asbury-1965

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About asbury-1965

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  1. I have taken a previous movie course in college and remember M as a favorite. I thought it decades before its time in its subject matter. The story of a child murderer would not be done in the U.S. or at least not in this way. Johnny Cash was once asked about the most famous line in his song, "Folsom Prison Blues" and how he came up with lyric "I shot a man in Reno just to watch him Die". He said it was the worst thing he could think of for a person to do. Similarly, Fritz Lange could think of nothing worse than a child murderer and his "Man in Black" is first represented in a childs macabre song, then a shadow, then a whistled tune called "Hall of the Mountain KIng". I researched the tune because it sounded very familiar. Years ago, on my first viewing, there was no internet and I had no idea what the song was. I was amazed to find out that I knew "Hall of the Mountain KIng" from an episode of Mad Men of the same title in which a young child plays it on the piano as part of his lesson and says he likes it because it is creepy, not unlike the children in the courtyard in M who also like creepy songs. Overall, the tihing that struck me most is the lack of sound in M. There is no film score highlighting suspenseful moments or sad moments and manipulating our emotions. Instead there is the song of the chidlren, the whistled tune of the murderer, the cukoo clock and school bells marking time, etc. I liked the silence in between and that I was not prompted to think by constant music but it allowed to see myself where the truth would lie.
  2. I do like the calm beginning, the camera panning slowing past the sleeping plantation worker and then by the light of the moon, we see the woman kill the man and she calls it an accident. I wonder where we are headed. Knowing who the killer is but not why reminds me of Columbo where we, the audience, always knew who done it but it was up to Columbo to figure out why by himself without our help. I have never seen the movie before so I have no clue what the authorities will have to say or in what manner the truth will be revealed and if the truth will only be known by the audience because the woman outwits the authorities or will we be kept guessing until the ig reveal.
  3. I think this is the longerst train scene without words I have ever seen. I was fascinated to watch all the tasks the two men had perform to go over the terrain and there was a false anxiety that something would happen along the way which was caused by the sights and sounds - the whislte, the dark tunnels, the darkness of the day, the train smoke, the chugging of the wheels, the bridge, the oncoming train and then you arrive at the station. The journey of life can be comparable. You never know what can happen at any moment and then you reach a station and you think you have arrived but what awaits you next? the journey is never ended unless your life ends. I am wondering how this sequence witll foreshadow the rest of the film.
  4. listening to a pod cast interview with our instructor. http://www.hifilmfest.com/2015/05/27/138-into-the-darkness-preparing-for-tcms-investigating-film-noir-class/
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