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@noir_ryan

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  1. Describe how this scene uses cinematography to accentuate the brutal beating of Steve Randall (Steve Brodie). To me, I believe that how this scene uses cinematography (the contrast between light and darkness along with the camera angles) adds another layer of intensity to the scene. Even how the overhead lighting swings back and forth over the crime boss’ head adds another layer to the savage beating that we (the audience) witness in the scene. How do Mann and Diskant utilize different points of view to heighten the tension in this scene? I think Mann and Diskant utilize different points of view in this scene to get the emotions for the characters across and to also increase the intensity of the scene. To me, I believe how they chose to manipulate the points of view made the scene more dramatic.
  2. Discuss how this film depicts and utilizes this "unnamed city." Additionally, why do you think the film is entitled "The Asphalt Jungle?"To me, I think that this film depicts and utilizes this “unnamed city” by allowing the audience to feel like this story can take place any where in any city. I think this film is entitled “The Asphalt Jungle” because of how the characters interact with each other. For example, in the scene where the man is supposed to identify the major character Dix from a police line up, he doesn’t because he knows that Dix is higher up on the food chain than him like a lion or another powerful animal in the jungle when compared to him and his safety. Describe the film noir characteristics, in both style and substance, of these opening scenes.I believe that both the style and substance of film noir can be found in these opening scenes by how the film lighting and camera staging is used. In addition to this, I also believe that it can be highlighted in how the characters interact with each other. Aside from the example I used above, the police scanner transmissions and the diner owner hiding Dix’s gun for him are also great examples of elements found in the world of film noir at play. -- Why are these opening scenes an interesting choice for a "heist film?" What are we learning about one of its major characters (Dix) that might be important for later in the film (and I'm not asking for any spoilers, just character insight)? To me, I believe these scenes are interesting because they draw the audience into the heist film with very subtle and key events. I also believe that we're learning that Dix is very clever and he has the right connections along with the right reputation and criminal history to pull off this heist film we're about to watch.
  3. In what ways does Miles Davis' score (improvised while watching scenes from the movie) work with and contribute additional layers of meaning to Louis Malle's visual design? I think Miles Davis’ score adds a depth of expressionism and realness to the scene. Going back to our original discussions of jazz on the film noir style, what is it about the "idioms of jazz" that resonate so well with the style and substance of film noir? I believe that Jazz resonates so well with the style and substance of film noir because of the same reason that listed above. I feel that Jazz adds another layer of complexity and meaning to film noir.
  4. Describe the noir elements, in terms of style and substance, in this opening sequence. To me, I noticed several noir elements in terms of style and substance in this opening sequence: The small Midwestern town setting, the suspense of the man looking for the woman only to find her dead, the overflowing of the bucket in the sink, how the camera was used as the man runs away and through the train yard, and the use of expressionism to highlight the man’s mental state once he is escaping on the train. What do you make of the film opening with the Salvation Army band playing and the prominent Salvation Army sign in that first shot? To me, I feel that the Salvation Army band playing and the prominent Salvation Army sign being used in this opening scene creates the atmosphere of a small Midwestern town. In addition to this, I also felt that it could be used to foreshadow the man possibly joining the army after he escapes on the train. Even though it is set in 1918, how does this scene reveal some of the typical noir themes of the 1950s? Although this scene is set in 1918, I believe that this scene reveals some of the typical noir themes of the 1950s through the elements I have listed above.
  5. Do you see evidence, even in the film's opening scenes, for Foster Hirsch's assessment that the dialogue in this film sounds like a "parody of the hard-boiled school" or that "noir conventions are being burlesqued"? Yes, I noticed a slight parody of the hard-boiled school in the dialogue for this opening scene of the film. However, it is kind of hard to notice being form this generation because we (my generation) mostly assume that people actually talked like this during that time period. But if you listen closely to the dialogue in the scene, you can spot certain parody phrasings like “What dish… and what kind of dame would marry a hood?” What are some of the major noir elements in this film's opening, and do they seem to be variations on similar elements we have encountered in other noir films from the mid to late 1940s? To me, I believe that there are some variations in the opening scene of this film that slightly parody some of the major noir elements that we have encountered in other noir films from the mid to late 1940s. First, how the title of the film appears on the screen and how the scene cuts to a sign that reads “Chicago Yard Limit” that has been shot at a dramatic angle. To me, these two things highlight the staging and camera work that film noir is known for. Secondly, the cynical dialogue between the two “hard-boiled” detectives creates a slight parody of the elements that we have discussed in regard to the characters and the attitudes that inhabit the world of film noir.
  6. Discuss the role of time and timing in this scene. To me, I believe that time and timing are the central theme of this scene. Everything is based on how each of character reacts in regard to time and the timing of their schedules. What are the film noir elements (style or substance) that you notice in the opening of this film? To me, there are a few film noir elements that I noticed about this opening scene. First, the expository intertitles and their semi-documentary realist style stands out as this film being one of the byproducts of the film noir universe. Secondly, the framing and camera movements also borrow from the film noir style. For example, when the film’s protagonist looks down from his window toward the bank, the camera follows his line of sight from the bank’s name window to the clock they have posted near by. To me, this allows the audience to visualize the protagonist’s point-of-view. Why is a heist a good subject for a film noir to tackle? Put another way, how or why might a film that involves a heist affect or change what we think about criminals and/or criminal behavior on screen? To me, I believe that heist films allow the audience to gain an understanding behind why the criminals and/or criminal decides to commit their crime. To me, this goes beyond the newspaper articles we see everyday and it gives you the means along with the motives for their behavior.
  7. Compare and contrast how director Karlson shoots and stages the boxing scene as a contrast of styles between cinema and television. To me, director Karlson compares and contrasts the difference between cinema and television in a few interesting ways in regard to the boxing scene. First, he uses the quick pace of film to represent Ernie’s (John Payne) live action memories of the scene. Secondly, he uses television to only represent the slow motion of the boxing scene because television was a new medium that people really didn’t trust at that time. Thirdly, he use the difference between the two mediums as a representation of Ernie looking back into his past (the television boxing scene) for the faults that predicted his present (him watching the boxing scene on television for faults in his actions). Discuss the scene's social commentary in the interactions between Ernie (John Payne) and Pauline (Peggie Castle). To me, I believe that there was a lot of social commentary between Ernie and Pauline. However, I think most of it was based on how each of them were upset that their future didn’t turn out how they dreamed it would be like Ernie being a world championship boxer and Pauline making a living as a star actress or both of the being rich. So instead of them blaming their own individual shortcomings on themselves, they decide to blame each other (well Pauline mostly blames Ernie for being a failure in her eyes). What are some of the noir elements in this scene, either in terms of style or substance? To me, the biggest noir elements that I notice in this scene are the types of characters that Ernie and Pauline are. They’re both washed up people but they’re too silly to see their own faults so they just blame each other. Ernie is an ex-boxer looking for a way to reclaim his glory and Pauline is most likely a talentless woman who only has her good looks to make it by in life. They’re a sad couple that seems like they will get worse before the story ends.
  8. Discuss the scene in terms of its acting and staging. In this brief scene, what do you see as the interpersonal relationships between Sam (Heflin), Walter (Douglas), and Martha (Stanwyck)? If you have seen the entire film, avoid larger points about the plot, and focus simply on what you are seeing just in this scene. Guessing from this short scene, I’m assuming that all three of them grew up together as children. However, Sam (Heflin) left and Walter (Douglas) took that as an opportunity to marry Martha (Stanwyck) and life a small town life. From this early scene, what are some of the noir themes that you expect will play out in this film? To me, some of the noir themes that I expect will play out in this film are: lust, murder, betrayal, corruption, and greed. I’m assuming that this will be a strange love triangle of sorts. What other films or settings in the Summer of Darkness lineup remind you of Griel Marcus' observation that "the most emblematic noir location is a small, vaguely Midwestern city?" To be honest, I really can’t think of any other than the films that were mentioned in the discussion already.
  9. Compare the opening of this film with other Daily Doses that began with a similar set-up on a deserted highway at night. How does this film's fateful twist differ from other film scenes we have investigated? To me, this opening is very different from the other films in the Daily Doses that began with a similar set-up on a deserted highway at night. I believe that this opening differs from the others because it is based on a bag of money being tossed into the back of a couple’s car not a woman who escaped from a mental hospital or a killer hitchhiker. I believe this creates a different type of plot from the other films. Why do you think unexpected incidents involving innocent people (such as today's couple) was such a popular postwar theme? What was changing in society and history that made this a popular film story for audiences at the time? To me, I believe that a sense of lost for the American values they believed in or their ideas about what was considered a wholesome America was being taken away so they believed that crime was everywhere. So innocent people like the couple or anybody could accidently become involved in a nefarious situation. Discuss this scene in terms of the style and substance of film noir. What do you see in this opening scene that confirms Eddie Muller's observation that this film is "'the best unknown American film noir of the classic era." To me, I believe that it has a great set-up because it makes you wonder what you would do if someone threw a bag of money into the backseat of your car. I also believe that it plays on the notion of how fair would innocent people go to protect their chance at living the “American Dream”.
  10. How is Hitchcock's rhythm and purposes different in this opening sequence, from other films noir such as Kiss Me Deadly or The Hitch-Hiker?To me, I believe that Hitchcock’s rhythm and purposes differ in this opening sequence from other films noir like Kiss Me Deadly and The Hitch-Hiker in several ways. Although Hitchcock’s opening sequence does track the shoes and legs of the main characters like in Kiss Me Deadly and The Hitch-Hiker, Hitchcock’s rhythm and purposes are completely different. I believe that his tracking of these two main characters is to show how similar yet different the men are. Also the background music is more whimsical and his camera movements are set up to mimic that both of these men are busy individuals. To me, I believe that from the openings of the other films, the audience can tell that they’re watching a movie. However, with Hitchcock’s film, I think that Hitchcock’s subtle use of camera work and themes lure the audience into the opening action of the psychological thriller that is masqueraded as an ordinary day. I also believe that this subtle approach allows the audience to drop their guard at least until the main character’s feet literally bump into each other. I also think that the commonplaceness of meeting a stranger on a train or commute is what makes this story so terrifying because it seems like Hitchcock is trying to set up a “This could happen to you too” story. What are the noir elements that you notice in the opening of this film? Either in terms of style or substance?In terms of lighting and stage, I noticed several noir elements in the opening of this film. Although they are subtle, these elements range from the comparison and contrast of the two men to the framing of where the men sit on the train. Guy Haines, the amateur tennis star, is more conservative and more affluent than the more streetwise and charmingly shady Bruno Anthony. I believe the characters dialogue about Bruno’s necktie even highlights the difference in their personalities and backgrounds. I believe this also expresses the difference in the types of characters that inhabit the world of film noir. -- Do you agree or disagree that Alfred Hitchcock should be considered a "special case" in discussion of film noir? Why or why not? I believe that Hitchcock should be considered a “special case” in discussing film noir because although he uses elements found in the film noir style, his approach is subtle when compared to the other films we have discussed. To me, I believe that Hitchcock has his own unique brand of suspense that uses or employs similar elements that can be found in the film noir style but with very different purposes behind his usage of them.
  11. Compare the opening of this film with the other three Daily Doses this week? Do you see parallels in the opening scenes of these films? To me, I believe that there are several similarities and differences between the opening of this film and the other three Daily Doses for this week. First, although Kiss Me Deadly and The Hitch-Hiker are both set on lonely highways and this film and Caged are not, all four of these films express some form of loneliness and hopelessness. For example, although Kiss Me Deadly and The Hitch-Hiker opening scenes only use a few people, they both have the same themes I mentioned above as D.O.A. and Caged even though those to films opening scenes use several people. To me, I believe the characters in D.O.A and Caged express the ideas of the protagonist being alone emotionally while being physically surrounded by other people. Secondly, the camera lighting and staging is different for D.O.A and Caged when comparing them with the opening scenes of Kiss Me Deadly and The Hitch-Hiker. The openings scenes for D.O.A and Caged have long cinematic shots even though cinematographers like Ernest Laszio worked on both D.O.A. and Kiss Me Deadly. To me, that shows that the camera lighting and staging was meant to express the same themes in world of film noir but differently. In addition to this, I believe that Kiss Me Deadly and The Hitch-Hiker had a more “In Your Face” style that highlighted the suspenseful and disorientating nature of those opening scenes while the opening scenes of D.O.A and Caged had a more “Hang Back” style to express the loneliness and uncertain feelings of the protagonists. I also believe that the focus point of each story’s protagonist and their character types were different as well. For example, Kiss Me Deadly and The Hitch-Hiker both focused on protagonist that were either mysteriously intriguing or unlikely people like the Hitch-Hiker. While the films D.O.A and Caged were all about the journey of the protagonist and their awkward “fish out of water” like experience. What are some of the noir themes and motifs that are being explored in this film's opening scene? This is also a good film through which to discuss Robert Porfirio's article on Existential motifs, since he references the film D.O.A. several times in his essay. To me, I believe that the opening scene of this film expressed and explored the themes and motifs of film noir that I mentioned above. However, D.O.A has a more pessimistic feeling to it because of the protagonist saying that he wanted to report his own murder. How does the style and substance of this film's opening reinforce a feeling of pessimism or hopelessness in the character of Frank Bigelow? To me, I believe that this film’s opening reinforces a feeling of pessimism or hopelessness how it uses its lighting and staging by having the character Frank Bigelow walk through the long dimly lit corridors of the Los Angeles police department. His facial expressions and the long camera shots cause the timing of the scene to feel like it is going on for an eternity also adding to its feelings of uncertainty. I also believe that having the character state that he is there to report his own murder helps reinforce the films themes of pessimism as well.
  12. Why is this opening appropriate for a film about females at a women's state prison? In what ways has the design of this scene made the audience as "caged" as these characters in this opening sequence? To me, I think that this is an appropriate opening for a film about females at a women’s state prison because I feel that it represents how metaphorically “caged” women were by American society at that time. They are forced to ride in silence as two men lead them to a strange new place and they can barely see where they are going. Then once they get there, they soon learn that it’s just another box that is controlled by male supremacy hence the sexist and discriminating dialogue from the guard. Metaphorically speaking, these women have already been in some type of prison in one form or another once they reach those doors. They’re just trading their bigger prison (a domineering male society) for a smaller one (an actual prison). In addition to this, I believe that the whole design of this scene from the long view of the caged windshield to the woman telling the protagonist “Take your last look at freeside, Kid” is meant to make the audience feel caged and helpless. What about this opening reminds you of the Warner Bros. house style? And why is that appropriate for this subject matter? Since Warner Brothers was known for their fast-talking low-budget tough urban dramas with working class values, this opening reminds me of their attention to detail for toughness and realism. For example, how the guard talks to the women and our view from the back of the prison truck highlight those themes. In addition to this, I believe that their style is appropriate for this subject matter because we not only expect a degree of toughness and realism but we (the audience) want one when watching a film about prison. To me, Warner Brothers figured out the right formula or style for movies that dealt with these subjects thanks to their work on other films like I Am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang that looked to represent toughness and realism opposed to the often glamorous and escapist films that were being produced by other studios at that time. Just based on this opening, how do you think film noir will influence this film's realism about life behind bars? In other words, why is the "substance of noir" appropriate for a story set inside a women's prison? Although I haven’t seen this film, I believe that the “substance of noir” will be appropriate for this story set inside a women’s prison because it will give the audience the toughness and realism that it needs in order to experience and understand the journey of the protagonist along with her. In addition to this, I also believe that the film noir style will create a dark yet realistic atmosphere for the world of the story and the characters of the film. I also believe that this will be done with a twisted and often times cynical attitude that will represent the hopeless of the characters who inhabit the world of this story.
  13. What are some of the major themes and/or ideas introduced in the opening sequence of The Hitch-Hiker? To me, I believe that the major themes and/or ideas introduced in the opening sequence of The Hitch-Hiker is based on the societal fears and pressures that were going on at that time like the growing fear that Americans started to have toward one another. For example, what the two men believe is a good deed like helping a person in need of a ride causes them to meet their untimely end at the hands of a stranger. I also believe that this opening scene is an attack on the set of core values that the American people at this time had about helping each other and that it shows how their sense of safety is no longer available to them. Discuss the role of lighting and staging in this scene, and how lighting and staging both work to reveal the underlying substance of film noir? I believe that the role of the lighting and staging for this scene and how they both work together reveals several things about the underlying substance of the film noir style. First, the use of the lighting and staging in this scene covers a lot of the information that we discussed in the article about film noir cinematography. For example, when we do see the hitchhiker’s face for the first time, his face is up close with shadows around it. Which adds an ominous and foreboding presence to the scene. Secondly, how the lighting and staging works together draws the audience into the scene and leaves us with a sense of panic like the two helpless men in the car. It makes you want to scream, “Somebody do something”, as you watch the scene take place. Thirdly, how the director uses the conventional protocols for the lighting and staging that we expect for the film noir style in new ways to terrify and frighten us keeps the audience guessing what will happen next as we watch the scene. I also believe that the director even uses those expectations against us as well. For example, when the man reaches for the rifle in the car, the scene turns more sinister because the hitchhiker tells the man that he won’t make it in time. Which adds another eerie and sinister layer to the scene because it feels like he was talking to us too. Compare and contrast the opening scenes of Kiss Me Deadly and The Hitch-Hiker? What is similar between the two? What is different? Why do these openings both work as excellent examples of how to open a film noir? To me, I believe that there are several similarities and differences between the opening scenes of Kiss Me Deadly and The Hitch-Hiker. In regard to similarities, they both open with a hitchhiker and someone who stops to help them. They both also use lighting and staging to create a mysterious, intriguing, and suspenseful atmosphere for the audience. In addition to this, they both give the audience a glimpse into the types of characters that could exist in the world of film noir. In regard to their differences, I believe that The Hitch-Hiker is more sinister in tone than Kiss Me Deadly. In The Hitch-Hiker, it feels like the moral/theme of the story has a “no good deed goes unpunished” tone to it while Kiss Me Deadly is more based on the mystery of who the female hitchhiker is and why does she need Mike Hammer’s help. In addition to this, Kiss Me Deadly played on the audience’s senses more and it was more disorienting than The Hitch-Hiker. Although both of these films do a great job of luring the audience into the film, I just felt that Kiss Me Deadly was more innovative with its use of special effects. I believe that both of these openings work as excellent examples of how to open a film noir because they both create a unique atmosphere that engages the audience and spins their suspension of disbelief because we (the audience) feel for the characters in each scene. In addition to this, I also feel that both of these scenes approach the conventions/protocols that the audience expects for the film noir style in fresh and innovative ways.
  14. What are some of the major themes and/or ideas introduced in the opening sequence of Kiss Me Deadly? To me, the major themes and/or ideas introduced in the opening sequence of Kiss Me Deadly are: Fear, Panic, Mystery, Intrigue, Desperation, Eroticism, Neuroticism, the Characters that populate the world of film noir, and Disorientation. What do we learn or discern about the characters of Christina Bailey (Cloris Leachman) and private eye Mike Hammer (Ralph Meeker) in this brief introductory sequence?From this brief introductory sequence, we (the audience) learn several things about the characters of Christina Bailey (Cloris Leachman) and private eye Mike Hammer (Ralph Meeker). First, in regard to Leachman’s character, we learn that Christina Bailey has been running for what seems like an undetermined amount of time on a mostly deserted highway from something or someone. In addition to this, we also learn that she will do anything to hitchhike a ride like almost being run over by Mike Hammer’s car in order to get away from it. When Mike Hammer tells Christina that she almost wrecked his car then gives her a glance over, we learn that Ralph Meeker’s character is a streetwise hard-boiled person who can deduce things very quickly. He can tell she’s a woman in major trouble, but what kind of trouble is the real question. Once they are traveling inside Mike’s car, Mike further shows the audience his cynical attitude by telling her, “Your thumb isn’t good enough for you, you’ve gotta use your whole body?” To which Christina replies, “Would you have stopped if I had used my thumb?” From this brief exchange of dialogue, we (the audience) learn that both the main characters for this story are mysterious, twisted, and cynical by this point. Mike even further investigates her with a line of even more cynical questions like “Do you always go around with no clothes on?” When they reach the roadblock up ahead, they overhear a police officer tell another driver that they are looking for a woman who escaped from a mental hospital that is young and wearing a trench coat. Christina grabs Mike’s hand and gives him a desperate look and he quickly deduces the situation. He quickly uses his wits and tells the officers that he hasn’t seen a thing and that his wife (Christina) has been asleep. Thanks to his quick thinking, the officers wave the couple through the roadblock. -- How is this opening scene an important contribution to the development of film noir? To me, I believe that this opening scene is an important contribution to the development of the film noir style in several ways. First, this opening sequence weaves the major themes for this story together in a subtle way that is almost seamless. The themes I noted above can be noticed from Christina running barefoot on the deserted road to Mike’s desperate quick thinking that gets them through the roadblock. Secondly, I also thought it was amazing how the director used audio and visual effects to draw the audience into the atmosphere of this film. For example, the contrast between Christina’s heavy breathing and Nat King Cole’s song I’d rather have the blues leaves the audience in a state of wonderment that is a blur between eroticism and neuroticism. Even the film’s innovative use of the title design that runs backwards adds to the audience’s sensory overload and disorientation from the film. Thirdly, I believe that this opening scene of Kiss Me Deadly (1955) adds style and substance to the film noir style by showing how tone and special effects (even extremely simple auditory and visual effects) can draw the film’s audience into the story in very subtle ways and also highlight the atmosphere of the film.
  15. What makes Harry Lime's (Orson Welles) "entrance" in this film so effective? To me, I believe the things that make Orson Welles’ “entrance” as Harry Lime so effective in this sequence is the build up in suspense before his face is revealed from the shadows. The first glimpse we see of his character is just an outline of his legs and his polished black shoes with a cat between them after Holly Martins (Joseph Cotton) yells, “Cat got your tongue”. Which I believe adds a comical yet ironic layer to the scene because of Harry Lime’s shoes and the cat that is grooming its paw between his shoes. As Holly Martins continues to yell for the unknown person to reveal himself, a woman upstairs turn on her light revealing an almost side view of only Harry Lime’s face in the shadows. Which seems unexpected to Orson Welles’ character. Harry Lime looks at Holly Martins for a brief second and Holly Martins looks back at him in total shock. They keep this exchange going for a brief moment before the angry woman from upstairs scolds Holly Martins for his yelling. To which, Orson Welles is sheepishly amused with a grin as the camera zooms in on his face. Then he grins a little more like “Yeah… it’s me. You got me!” When Holly Martins realizes that it’s Harry, Orson Welles grins again like “You should the look on your face.” Then the camera cuts back to the angry woman upstairs again as she continues to scold Holly Martins before closing her window. After that, Orson Welles grins again like the Cheshire Cat then his face disappears in the blink of an eye much like the Cheshire Cat only leaving the audience with his iconic grin in mind. To which only Alice in wonderland could remark and agree that she has often seen a cat without a grin but never a grin without a cat. As Holly Martins approaches where he saw Harry, he is almost hit by a car. After a few moments, he regains his train of thought and hears someone running away. He follows the sound to see what he believes is Harry’s shadow then gives chase only be left without a clue to Harry’s whereabouts again. He washes his face in a nearby fountain as if to say “was it all a dream”. When he returns with two military officers and they discover where Harry could of disappeared to, one of the officers exclaims “… It wasn’t the German Gin” as if to say “I believe Holly now and it wasn’t his mind playing tricks on him or a drunken mirage." I believe that all of these elements make the “entrance” of Orson Welles and his character for the story very dynamic. Discuss how this scene is both deeply realistic (in its depiction of a war-torn Vienna) and highly formalistic (in its use of a variety of non-realistic camera, lighting and musical techniques). To me, I believe that this scene is deeply realistic in its depiction of a war-torn Vienna because I felt it illustrates how the area was filled with paranoia and espionage after the war. In addition to this, I also felt that having two military officers investigate Holly’s claims also added a sense of realism to the depiction of a war-torn Vienna. In regard to the scene being highly formalistic, I believe that the music for the sequence also adds another formalistic layer to sequence because it seems to be playing as a musical score to Holly’s thought process as he sees the appearing and disappearing Harry Lime. Aside from all of the various non-realistic camera and lighting techniques in this sequence that I described in the first question, I felt that the music added a deeper meaning to the scene. I believe that this was the director’s attempt at playing with the audience’s perception of the scene and experimenting with psychoacoustics. In what ways can this scene from The Third Man be considered an important contribution to the film noir style? To me, I believe that this scene from The Third Man can be considered an important contribution to the film noir style because it not only experiments with various elements found in the film noir style but it also shows that a film can play with the psychological responses of the characters in the film and the audience watching the film as well.
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