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dmathewslee

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About dmathewslee

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    Newbie

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Birmingham, Alabama
  • Interests
    My wife and son, photography, art, hiking/camping, film, history, reading, guitar.
  1. Exquisite black and white photography that I would describe as "velvet". It is obvious that each frame was carefully chosen for maximum lighting and composition. Backgrounds melt into impressionistic paintings within the shallow depth of field as the camera focuses on our main characters who are sharp and in contrast with various tones and shades of grey. The narration and dialogue propelled the story but all of my attention was engulfed in the beauty of the imagery and the vision of a master of his craft.
  2. There are some wonderful and insightful analyses so far in these forums. I come to this topic of film noir as "green". I have on the other hand been an aficionado of film since early adulthood. I had dreams of leaving the South where there are no major schools for filmmaking in pursuit for a career in film. I did go into film through photography but remained in the South. I am not a huge fan of "who-done-it" storytelling in film but I love it in literature. It is not surprising that some of these films are taken from the pages of mystery/crime novels rich with quick witted dialogue, red-
  3. With respect to "M" there were similarities such as the use of tracking shots to scan the dark and empty space. It sets the mood early. We are introduced to a mysterious sitting figure which we may not have noticed before the light pours through an open door. The mystery man has been gazing into a swinging metronome of what appears to be his existence. The use of light overcoming darkness is revealed in his mood change once the ticking is up and the six o'clock chime is rewarding his exit to different faces and multitudes of people. I believe we saw examples of light revealing truth in "M
  4. In our modern day and age of social media we as viewers are inundated with first person cell phone videos. This fact makes the opening to "Dark Passage" seem like a gimmick to my modern eye. However in 1947 this was probably a shock to the movie goers senses and was a useful tool in motivating the action. We are placed literally inside the head of our character's moral dilemma.
  5. In our modern day and age of social media we as viewers are inundated with first person cell phone videos. This fact makes the opening to "Dark Passage" seem like a gimmick to my modern eye. However in 1947 this was probably a shock to the movie goers senses and was a useful tool in motivating the action. We are placed literally inside the head of our character's moral dilemma.
  6. William Wyler wastes no time sending the viewer, an observer, right into the middle of the action. We are placed in the middle of an average night on a rubber plantation at the end of a work day. Nothing appears unusual until our tracking shot is interrupted by a heart stopping gunshot. We are unaware of the circumstances but clearly see Betty Davis' character committing the act stone faced and determined until the clouds cover the light of the moon creating a sinister scene and revealing the true nature of her actions as the moonlight reveals her cast shadow on the victims body. The worke
  7. "La Bete Humaine", translated "The Human Beast". .Jean Renoir's film opening puts you directly into the gritty action observing two men working hard to tame this mechanical beast of a train. It seems they are in a hurry eventually arriving at La Havre. For the first three and a half minutes of the trip, we as viewers are simply there for the ride. There are no clues as to where they are going or their motivation. The mystery is for us to observe and analyze given clues. A true mark of what I believe film noir to be.
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