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vintagegal711

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About vintagegal711

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  1. A mother-daughter spat with a little higher stakes. Rather unsettling music plays an important role in this scene where things are “spiraling” down and out of control; a seemingly innocent looking young girl with a sweet voice and pleasant smile suddenly turns savage. But is it so "sudden?" I should say not. It’s pure, pent-up hatred (and, dare I say, unwarranted) released in climax. This severely ungrateful daughter lashes out at the only person who has stood by her. Her mother, who has worked hard to raise them both out of a life of poverty, is shocked to finally see the truth.
  2. Laura - one of my absolute favorites! I had never thought of it before as being "a character study of furnishings and faces," but I like thinking of it that way now. It concentrates very much on people with "lavish" life-styles and good taste. The most obvious (and important) furnishing is one not shown in the opening scene, but rather the opening credits... worth mentioning because it is the portrait of Laura, herself. Simply stunning. And we immediately see the mysterious, haunting quality about this girl who we assume we will never meet, since she is dead from the start of the film.
  3. POV camera angles are not quite as accurate as actually seeing something with your own eyes, of course, because the camera is limited (no peripheral vision)... I do not have to turn my head quite so emphatically and face something straight on when looking to the right or left of me... (this is a noticeable difference for me when watching movies filmed in that way), however, because of this lack of peripheral, we are knowing even less about what is going on around us, which, I think, adds to the suspense. The feeling I got was almost as though I was boxed in, with only a small claustrophobic
  4. First film I've seen so far! But the opening is still as potent, as if I had never seen it. Setting - exotic Singapore. Background - jungle music. A romantically bright moon looks down over... sweaty, tired workers settling in for the night while the rubber trees ooze their lethargic drops. All is lazy. All is quiet. But then the mood is cut. A blast from a gun! The music stops. A bird is startled and flies off. A man stumbles onto a porch. Enter: Bette, as only she can. (Gosh, I love her!) Another shot. The dogs are alerted, the men are alerted. Again. And another. Anothe
  5. I wrote my observations very extensively and nicely but something went wrong and I lost all of my work... thus, I will try to simplify. Shaky, realistic/documentary-style way of shooting the scene. Some might feel this opening was long and drawn out, but these are men doing a job. We are shown a small portion of time, but these men took the whole trip. They live with the dirt, the noise, the constant vigil... Here you have the larger-than-life excitement of a train, hurtling across the tracks at break-neck speeds, versus the calm, almost "strictly routine" attitudes of the enginee
  6. When I think of film noir (and I've seen quite a few) I think symbolism. I see the cities, known for their bright lights, only reaching just so far as light abruptly turns to shadow. I think of cigarette smoke, fog, and dark corners, where bad things happen. Characters have sinister motives, secrets, and hidden agendas. Even the hero/heroine is often tainted by something in his/her past. Detectives, reporters and femme fatales flood the screen with their presence. In this opening clip we see victims - children - playing and singing in their sweet, child-like manner a morbid song. This
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