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Khsampon

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  1. Stark. The movie, "M", was stark with few/no enhancements to the environmental imagery. Though in "Ministry if Fear" there is more details in the set, the solitude is still prevalent. Also, the camera angle from above makes the viewer more of an observer who's apart from the action like in "M".
  2. Powell is in command. He controls the conversation and the camera angles frame him in a way that gives him all the power. The scene is set and the story is staged within the first few minutes in a dramatic style. Ah, yes, Film Noir.
  3. People in turmoil. Opening scene sets the stage for the type of people we'll be seeing and for the complex plot of good/bad that's coming. Lydecker is in command. Will he be able to maintain control? How will the detective be able to determine the truth? The mystery is established within the first 4 minutes of the story. Film Noir.
  4. Using the 1st person POV builds drama in the scene. Film Noir is all about drama both visually and psychologically. Even the mention of the upholstery adds significance to the storyline by making the viewer notice it now so it will be ominous later. The full frame close-up of the driver is a stark contrast to the anonymity of the passenger and menacing, as well. He seems too close, inside the passenger's personal space as are his questions. Once again, right from the start, the viewer is immediately drawn into the tension of the plot.
  5. I think the sequence of the first three movies that we've seen is interesting. The movie,"M", was surrealistic in style; La Bête Humaine was super-realistic; and The Letter seems to be a mix of both. The drama of Film Noir commands each in lighting, camera angle, timing, composition, and story line.
  6. I think the sequence of the first three movies that we've seen is interesting. The movie,"M", was surrealistic in style; La Bête Humaine was super-realistic; and The Letter seems to be a mix of both. The drama of Film Noir commands each in lighting, camera angle, timing, composition, and story line.
  7. The opening scene is stark and cold. The children are in an environment that affords them no pleasure or entertainment. The somber woman commands them to stop from behind a railing that looks like a fence topped by a clothesline that looks like barbed wire. Life in general is too much for her. No love. Alone. Too hard. The shadows accent the figures adding gloom. The towering shadow of the murderer commands the composition while every trace of the child, visually and audibly, is absent. The desperate message is clear.
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