Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Tim Hansen

Members
  • Content Count

    5
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Tim Hansen

  • Rank
    Newbie
  1. Marlowe throws his first warning to Ann Gayle when he said, "I'd just get you in a lot of trouble." Gayle persists in her questions, and Marlowe lets her walk into his office. His nonchalance in locking himself and Gayle inside his office demonstrates a cunning and calculating mind. His use of force to extract the truth from Gayle shows a detective who knows what motivates human nature. Marlowe thinks of himself as a businessman and implies this attitude towards the end of the scene with the following line: "I'd like to follow through on a sale." Good dramatic tension arises from a crisp dialo
  2. The camera's slow pan of Lydecker's impeccably furnished apartment and then focusing on the detective seemed to be a subtle hint that the culprit had already been found and then for the story to follow on how it all ends. Why is Lydecker such an eccentric? As Lydecker sat in his luxurious tub and swatted away the questions of the detective, there almost seemed to be a tension between the two. Was it more than just the questions? The scenes and the dialogue capture the viewer's curiosity. A good start to this story.
  3. Innovative use of first person point of view. View from the barrel conveyed disorientation and a world in upheaval. Bogart is classic in this film.
  4. The music by Max Steiner brilliantly complements the opening scene of the plantation as the day fades away and only to have it all shattered by six successive gunshots. Of course, no other actress except Bette Davis could pull off such a murder with such poise and certitude. Didn't realize Somerset Maugham wrote this story.
  5. Excellent focus on the train engine from various angles, especially from the undercarriage. The feeling of motion and speed was almost tangible. The exterior views from the train reminded me of the views from the train for Hitchcock's "North by Northwest." The interactions of the two engineers convey a sense of teamwork and fraternity within the first few minutes. Well done.[/size]
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...