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stuartgrist

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About stuartgrist

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  1. The gay suggestion is good analysis, but too easy a guess for Webb's character. it's too easy of an red herring. Here's an opposite view of the same character, but MORE focused on the living room and not the bathroom (I copied my statement from canvas.net and it's also somewhere her on the board but I can't find it)..... Just seconds of fading in black, Clifton Web says what is the climax of the whole story at beginning. Laura was murdered, and we know immediately he loved Laura. The film is really the afterwards conclusion of the terrible crime. Web is obviously making hints about clues when
  2. All I can say is wow! I love the bath connection to Murat! As someone with a degree in History I wish I would have thought of that! I have to repost this! All four poinst are excellent! Good job!
  3. Excellent literary connection! Joyce did make a good deal of writing on settings and locations, and objects because he believed it was important for explaining his characters. His book "Ulysses" is pointed out as a prime example(Although I haven read that one yet, but many have) because describes in detail almost all of Dublin. Many of the buildings are standing today in that great city! Film Noir seems to follow this idea with the "city" as the setting! Nice noticing!
  4. Just seconds of fading in black, Clifton Web says what is the climax of the whole story at beginning. Laura was murdered, and we know immediately he loved Laura. The film is really the afterwards conclusion of the terrible crime. Web is obviously making hints about clues when he mentions the clock. The clock that has an exact copy at Laura's room where she was murdered. So immediately like Hitchcock who often says the clock is our "macguffen" an obvious clue and plot device, and so important to the plot that we even see Dana Andrew looking at the clock along with the camera's eye! It's telling
  5. I've been watching the whole lineup today, and I've noticed with M to Johnny Eager certain themes and artistic styles growing in the chronological order I thought I I've would give. M, indeed laid the foundations it's obvious! The use of light and shadow, the use of unusual camera angles, the dirty, dangerous city are obviously themes and styles. But what also noticed the story of the inner person. From Lorre's compulsion to kill little children to Gabin trying not to kill (basically due to genetic problems) we see evil is ever there no matter how a person looks. Film noir is about what makes
  6. This was the first time I've ever seen Fritz Lang's "M"! I was impressed by the multilayered script, and many, many characters! Lorre's performance as the murderer was brilliant and the best I've ever seen of his! There weren't major actors, but an ensemble cast of many. I love the whole phone conversation between the Commisioner and the politician. There conversation flows with images that tell the story of the investigation. I thought that was brilliant and Lang's use of editing and sound was effective as well! Like the meeting session of the criminals vs. the police. Both sides of the law t
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