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MissDavis442

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About MissDavis442

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  • Birthday 06/29/1921

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    Film Noir, Whodunnits and Classic Horror

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  1. “Good morning.” “You’re not very tall, are you?” “Yeah well, I try to be.” “Not bad, but you probably know it.” The girl said as she flirtatiously bites a strand of her hair. “Thank you.” “What’s your name?” “Reilly, Doghouse Reilly.” “That’s a funny kind of name.” “Think so?” “What are you, a prizefighter?” “No, I’m a shamus.” “What’s a shamus?” “It’s a private detective” “You’re making fun of me.” “Uh-uh.” She fell straight back into Marlowe’s arms. He had to catch her or let her fall. So he caught her. “You’re cute.” The butler walks in the room to see Marlowe holding the girl. No reaction. “The General will see you now, Mr. Marlowe.” The girl sashays away. “Eh, who was that?” “Miss Carmen Sternwood, sir.” “You ought to wean her. She looks old enough.” “Yes sir.” Philip Marlowe is no push-over ready to fall for a young flirting girl with dubious intentions.
  2. In contrast to the brightly fluorescent-lit diner scene that Nick Adams rushes away from, we see Nick leaping frantically over the many back fences only to find the Swede just lying in the darkened room; shadows cover his face, his voice monochrome, almost emotionless. His movement is minimal. The Swede is a man waiting for the inevitable, a man waiting to die. All Nick could do is leave the room with his head held low. You can’t get any more Film Noir than that.
  3. Has anyone ever watched Cab Callaway sing “Minnie the Moocher”? He struts and he hunches over in his zoot suit, his knees are bent his shoulders are slouched. This is what Rita Hayworth was doing during the first part of the song. She does all of the Cab Calloway stuff AND a bit of hip protruding and arms spread open, insinuating sex. The most obvious sexual allusion is when she pulls her hair up and holds it in place with her arms. Now, any dancer who is on a stage in front of an audience would never pull such a move as that because it would look really odd to the audience in the club. It would not translate very well live. But, that move was not for the audience in the club, that move was for the close up shot that the camera was capturing. That was to make it look as though she might be in bed having sex. And that pose and her movements during that pose, in a close up frame, did resemble that. I imagine the people seeing this on a big screen for the first time in the movie theater must have been put in to a real dither after that performance.
  4. Has anyone ever watched Cab Callaway sing “Minnie the Moocher”? He struts and he hunches over in his zoot suit, his knees are bent his shoulders are slouched. This is what Rita Hayworth was doing during the first part of the song. She does all of the Cab Calloway stuff AND a bit of hip protruding and arms spread open, insinuating sex. The most obvious sexual allusion is when she pulls her hair up and holds it in place with her arms. Now, any dancer who is on a stage in front of an audience would never pull such a move as that because it would look really odd to the audience in the club. It would not translate very well live. But, that move was not for the audience in the club, that move was for the close up shot that the camera was capturing. That was to make it look as though she might be in bed having sex. And that pose and her movements during that pose, in a close up frame, did resemble that. I imagine the people seeing this on a big screen for the first time in the movie theater must have been put in to a real dither after that performance.
  5. The daughter is very lax and cavalier while the mother was physically stiff with concern. That was until the mother expressed disapproval of her daughter's plans. At that point, the daughter became stiff and fidgety with belligerence. The womens' movement throughout the room was like a dance that culminated with an off balancing slap and a sharp reprimand. Very dramatic, and given the subject matter of blackmail and faked (or maybe not faked but aborted) pregnancy, is all pretty dark. Like much of the subjects in Film Noir.
  6. Describe some of the things Marlowe says or does that make him a new kind of private detective? All I can do is compare him to Sherlock Holmes or Philo Vance where those characters were intellectuals that studied the evidence and (almost) always out-smarted the bad guys. They were almost always professional with their clients, whereas this character, Phillip Marlowe, is extremely flawed, rude, and rough around the edges and at times gets out-smarted and out-muscled. Why do you think this kind of private detective fits so well within the film noir context? Phillip Marlow represents grim, grim reality. The way a real Private Eye might be like, absolutely imperfect. In what ways can this scene from Murder, My Sweet be considered as an important contribution to the film noir style? I think I know why the ENTIRE FILM, “Murder, My Sweet” might be considered to be important to the Film Noir style, but I’m not sure about why the particular clip provided in the Daily Dose #6 is important to the style. Perhaps it’s because it establishes Phillip Marlowe as practically a hoodlum (a common Film Noir trait) as opposed a clean-cut hero. I’d have to do research to confirm this but this character established may be among the very few original ANTI-HEROs that is expected to save the day? And this scene provides us with an example of that insight.
  7. In what ways can the opening of Laura be considered as an important contribution to the film noir style? A:The elements and objects that made up the shot (mise-en-scène?) during the opening scene inside Waldo Lydecker’s opulent apartment, is so well lit and so detailed. Deep focus (a film noir trait?) must have been used in order for one to feel immersed (or uncomfortably out of place) in his world. In my opinion, Film Noir movies are brilliant at creating atmosphere that visually clues the viewer in on the characters, their motives and the upcoming storyline. “Laura” has that very atmosphere and all its clues and hints in spades.
  8. What do you think about how Preminger introduces the character of Waldo Lydecker in this scene? Based on the opening scene’s setting and dialogue, one gets the impression that Waldo is very wealthy, self-entitled, self-absorbed, arrogant, extremely intelligent (but in reality, perhaps not quite as intelligent as his ego allows) and fancies himself as possessing an Oscar Wilde caliber wit.
  9. -- What examples do you see that fit with Nino Frank's contention that Laura is a "charming character study of furnishings and faces?" A: The settings are pure luxury and the affluent people in those surroundings might be considered 'the beautiful people'? I'm not really certain about the precise meaning behind the comment, "charming character study of furnishings and faces". But, perhaps the critic's meaning is that Preminger added beautiful people and beautiful surroundings as an example of his film's affluent characters who live lush existences and still they are just as twisted and as the low-down as the average crook or gangster in the average formulaic and drab police drama?
  10. I respectfully disagree with all of the people who negatively criticize this movie as being unnatural or the POV ran on too long or POV is a gimmick or this could have been done a lot better, the acting was stilted, some scenes were unintentionally comical etc. These are the very things that I love about Film Noir. There is always an element of the surreal, the grotesque the in-your-face. If you go back and watch M, that will remind you of where all those elements where inspired from. Dark Passage is highly stylized, and that's why I like it. If I want natural lighting and realistic, true to life acting and dialogue, I'll just watch movies from the 1970s.
  11. The hyper-realism of the opening scene, a speeding train with all of its coal grit that covers the character's faces, the ear-splitting, tumultuous roar of the engine and the rocky turblence of the ride is to me prophetic of what's to come in the storyline ahead. I believe that Film Noir movies tend to give many clues through out as to how the story is to unfurl.
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