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LeslieArtist

Members
  • Content Count

    9
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About LeslieArtist

  • Rank
    Newbie
  • Birthday May 11

Contact Methods

  • MSN
    lesliereiki@msn.com
  • Website URL
    http://www.artsavestheworld.com

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Denver
  • Interests
    Art, Writing, Film, Godzilla, cats, food, praying the human race will not destroy this planet. I am 71.
  1. Education, human interest, consciousness raising, documentary and composite of a real story - all these things should keep happening. Americans still don't get it. And even though I do, I have to make myself watch and keep learning. The thing about consciousness... it's so easy to slip back into comfort zones of routine and institutionalized ignorance.
  2. Slowly getting through the credits while the pendulum swings. Closing in on almost 6 - is it day or night? Slowly pulling back through the dark room to Ray Milland in shadow. Menace, wondering, and then... Very chipper man enters, all is well, Ray is being released, going to London to be around lots of people even though it's being heavily bombed... and he's leaving from where? An asylum! Very juicy going back and forth from dread to relief. In M there was no relief.
  3. Although Dick Powell isn't my idea of PI Marlowe, he does okay... smirky about being able to lock the woman in his office, irreverent enough to grab her wrists and dump out her purse because he's suspicious. So here's the tough guy just on the edge of good and bad. Private PI business is tricky that way. Women can't sweet talk him and they shouldn't try. I'm not good at analysis in this regard because my willing suspension of disbelief is pretty accepting of the genre. But I repeat myself.
  4. Laura - yes, let's the audience know up front Laura has died horribly. Teaches the audience also, like Hitchcock, to get to the movie on time so you don't miss the important beginning. I like voice overs - or maybe I expect them in crime/mystery dramas - Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer et al. I'm trying to find this film to see it again, since it has been decades.
  5. So many have already dissected the technique of the film. Lorre is great as the killer. I so wanted the crowd to get their revenge on him (sort of Lord of the Flies) but he gets away with it. Ah well. I liked Elsa's bouncing ball against the wanted poster, liked the long shadows and liked the street people hunting the killer down, but didn't like the ending of the film. German is not my favorite language. Having to read the subtitles most of the time takes away from the cinematography and the creepiness of the anticipation. The abandoned ball rolling to a stop, and the balloon floating away were both excellent emotional devices to underscore that another child had been killed. Now the movies are obsessed with graphic depictions leaving nothing to the imagination, but in this film, the imagination works on the psyche. Hitchcock knew this well. Still, if the criticism of much Film Noir is its cynicism, this one arguing for mercy is then more expressionistic.
  6. I'm such a fan of Bogart anyway. The barrel trip down the hill was good filmed from inside. The POV was like a crime novel narration. What happened to the hapless driver? Too bad neither one of them turned off the radio, but there ya go. How many Film Noir or other movies begin with voice overs like this, or the camera as the eyes of the narrator, I don't know, so not sure when the device was first used and how many followed. If this was the first, then hooray.
  7. This was not hard for me to watch at all. Gun shots go off in my neighborhood, too. I don't like it, but in the movies... I'm safe. I actually smiled (uh oh) seeing Bette Davis empty her gun... must have been into the dirt because the body was so un marked. I liked it when the movies weren't so graphic (bloody shredded bodies like now). I know it's the movies so I'm okay with it. So Who was it? Her husband? Why did he deserve to be shot? or did he? Is Bette just nuts or is it because of owning a plantation that old white supremacy thing lets her get away with murder? I look forward to seeing this movie.
  8. The opening train sequence is a luxury of time one doesn't often see today that's for sure. I like black and white (hence being in the course) and have never seen this film. I'm also very new to this sort of class and how all this complicated stuff works. We shall see if an old dog can learn new tricks. Leslie
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