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johnranta

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About johnranta

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  1. I knew nothing of "The Letter" before seeing this clip. It's a very powerful opener, in so many ways. The long, slow dolly shots, lit by moonlight, slipping into and out of shadow. It feels somewhat slow and peaceful, but there are a couple of things that create tension. The drip-drip-drip of the rubber sap. The music, plaintive and a bit sad. We're waiting, wondering what the camera is going to reveal as it glides slowly across the scene. The gunshot is a shock, both to us and the cockatoo on the fence. We watch Bette Davis (who does indeed, have "Bette Davis Eyes") very deliberately murder t
  2. It's dangerous commenting on the details of a film that I haven't seen in its entirety. And I was one who suggested that Bete's opening scene does not show the characteristic cinematic approach of a film noir. But I just read the film synopsis on TCM. In one aspect, that of the story of a triangle of characters where the protagonist is tempted by lust (or greed or envy - one of the deadly sins), it seems that Bete fits the noir bill. I think I'll have to watch it, to understand this better.
  3. Good point, regarding smoking. Another noir in which smoking played a major role was "Double Indemnity".
  4. The opening scene has great energy. The camera work is impressive, especially the shots from the wheels' point of view, and the shots in the tunnel (loved the total darkness gradually giving way to the light at the end of the tunnel). But it doesn't feel noirish. I don't get a sense of foreboding. The scenes are mostly open, and well-lit (except for the tunnel). The action is full of energy, like a train scene in a western (Butch Cassidy, for instance). In fact that's what it felt like to me, Renoir directing a "Baguette" (can't be Spaghetti in France) Western. The music also gives it e
  5. The opening scene has great energy. The camera work is impressive, especially the shots from the wheels' point of view, and the shots in the tunnel (loved the total darkness gradually giving way to the light at the end of the tunnel). But it doesn't feel noirish. I don't get a sense of foreboding. The scenes are mostly open, and well-lit (except for the tunnel). The action is full of energy, like a train scene in a western (Butch Cassidy, for instance). In fact that's what it felt like to me, Renoir directing a "Baguette" (can't be Spaghetti in France) Western. The music also gives it ene
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