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friendo55

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  1. This film, with all of it's noir characterizations, certainly makes a strong case for noir being a style or movement as opposed to a genre. This is clearly a female melodrama but with a noir undertone. This verbal battle between mother and daughter is all about control, and where these two actresses are positioned tells the story. At first, we have Joan Crawford's Mildred dominating the exchange with her standing over Ann Blyth's Veda on the couch. Once Veda reveals her true feelings and dark intentions, the two stand side by side, equal at that moment. Next, we see Veda on the stairwell,
  2. I believe this is the first Daily Dose clip where the opening credits have been left in - and for good reason. The swining pendulum, and more importantly for me, the ominous and dark mood of the score, linger heavily. It's foreshadowing of dread hits you over the head, and the clock signals it may not take long. It is the clock that our revealed protagonist has been staring at for years now, enjoying his last night crawl by until midnight hits and he is released. As we get that overhead shot in M of the kids playing and rhyming about a murderer, we get a similar overhead angle of a suppose
  3. Right away, Phillip Marlowe doesn't trust anyone. An attractive woman walks in, and immediately thinks she's up to no good. He towers over her while she sits down, gets touchy and cute while asking about her hands, and quickly gets a hold of the items in her purse to get the real story. This is a man taking action and not pulling any punches - and certainly not following normal procedures. In a story where a plot twists and turns on a dime, a quick-thinking and rule-bending detective is necessary to keep up. We see this type of detective often in films noir, and watching even a few of thes
  4. What was certainly striking about Waldo Lydecker is the quick transition from hearing him narrate the scene, to appearing on screen in the bathtub! Certainly an eccentric character to welcome a detective into his home that way. The museum-like setting with expensive trinkets could assume a materialistic and possessive person - could he also feel the same way about Laura? The beautiful younger woman may be just that, another trophy for him, rather than someone he loved or cared for. The high-class setting of this opening scene is a contrast compared to the dark alleyways and cheap motel
  5. Again, similar to how shocking The Letter may have been to moviegoers in 1940, I wonder how this felt to those watching brand new in 1947. This POV shot now in 2015 felt tacky but at the same time immediately had me invested. I enjoyed the shot once the barrel stopped rolling and you watch Bogart stumble out - but the camera doesn't follow. It quickly reverts back to POV and, while it was fun for the opening shot, I'm glad it wasn't a technique other noirs readily adopted.
  6. Having watched a lot of noir films already, this was par for the course. But, putting myself into the shoes of moviegoers in 1940, it must've truly been jarring and extremely effective. This was further utilized in many films noir, having the calm and the ordinary be disrupted by extraordinary circumstances.
  7. I've listened to most of the podcast in the car through subscribing on iTunes, and it's a nice supplement even for us who have already logged in and are planning to commit time to this. Hearing Richard's enthusiasm, passion, and attention to detail is certainly encouraging and I can't wait to see how these modules and video lessons are laid out! I've also listened to previous episodes of the "Out of the Past" podcast and they're fun and very informative.
  8. First things I noticed right away after watching that clip: 1) The sudden change from the authentic traveling and working of the train, to being immersed in that tunnel in total darkness - very noir in spirit. All we hear are the sounds of the engine, and as filmgoers in 2015, we're conditioned to know that something terrible may happen next. What a relief when the train emerges and everything returns to normalcy. 2) The lack of a musical score up until the final minute of the clip as the train nears the station. First it's a tense pressure-filled score, as if the train is narrowly esc
  9. First things I noticed right away after watching that clip: 1) The sudden change from the authentic traveling and working of the train, to being immersed in that tunnel in total darkness - very noir in spirit. All we hear are the sounds of the engine, and as filmgoers in 2015, we're conditioned to know that something terrible may happen next. What a relief when the train emerges and everything returns to normalcy. 2) The lack of a musical score up until the final minute of the clip as the train nears the station. First it's a tense pressure-filled score, as if the train is narrowly esc
  10. So many great responses already! But the opening shot is so essential as we look down on these children playing the same way the mother eventually does from the balcony. We play the role of parent, watching these kids and hoping they're okay. But they sing a song of murder and death which immediately creates unease and a possible foreshadowing of what's to come. Then we have a brief conversation between the two mothers, where one says "as long as hear them sing, they're okay" - yet as the shot lingers on the mother and the washboard, we no longer hear them singing like we did before. E
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