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jistoops

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About jistoops

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  1. Links to all of them are in the assignments area of Canvas. https://learn.canvas.net/courses/748/assignments
  2. The daily dose for 7/16 was not accessible to me this morning, Popup said I lacked authorization,
  3. I don't subscribe to a television provider so, of this weeks TCM-aired films, I can only discuss the films The Big Sleep (I've had a DVD copy for years) and Hollow Triumph, a.k.a.The Scar (which is in the public domain). If you haven't already done so, and if you have the time, I absolutely recommend the four optional readings the Professor linked to in Part 3 of 4 of this weeks module, especially the Dashiell Hammett short story "Arson Plus." America's treatment of Hammett and the other people black-listed by the HUAC is one this Nation's most shameful chapters. But, like the stalwart soldier and patriot that he was, Hammett refused to cooperate with the witchhunt. I, for one, will make it a point to find his grave in Arlington National Cemetery the next time I'm up in DC and pay my respects.
  4. As one old dog to another, I empathize. I always find myself becoming too engrossed in a movie and forget about trying to apply some critical thinking towards what it is exactly that I am watching. As students I guess we're supposed to reach a point where we can enjoy and analyze concurrently but so far I have not learned that trick. Maybe someone can share some techniques. Other than constantly pausing and rewinding, I can not think of any - and I am not prepared to pause/rewind/replay at this point.
  5. YouTube also has a short film based on The Killers that was made in 1956 by Andrei Tarkovsky, Marika Beiku and Aleksandr Gordon while they were students at the State Institute of Cinematography in the Soviet Union. Includes the Nighthawiking scene and the scene in the Swede's room. Worth watching. [...]
  6. As to the introduction of the Waldo character, the scene reminds me of two stories I've heard. The first story is about the way Admiral Hyman Rickover used to conduct interviews of candidates for acceptance into the Naval Nuclear Propulsion program. According to a friend and shipmate of mine who was interviewed by Rickover, the Admiral had a chair in front of his office desk for the candidates, and he had dramatically shortened the two front legs of that chair, automatically forciing the interviewee into an awkward, uncomfortable and even obsequious position for the course of the interview. The second story, which may be apocryphal, concerns LBJ, who it was said used to conduct in-person conversations with his Presidential aides while he was sitting on his toilet. Both stories, and the Waldo introduction, obviously indicate disdain.
  7. The first circular framing was stark and harsh. Following close behind, the second subtly resonated the first and was, I think, carefully chosen for that reason.
  8. In the Daily Dose clip for Dark Passage, I was struck by the two POV images framed by circles, the first Bogart emerging from the barrel and the second his first glimpse of San Francisco across the water, roughly encircled by the boughs of the foilage around him. Views from birth canals? I can't remember the entire film but I wonder if there is other similar framing in later scenes.
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