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Lindatee

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  1. Marlowe introduced himself at the door. We learn that he's 38, been to college, smokes, drinks brandy, is used to flirtatious women, honest, been fired for insubordination, which means he speaks his mind, regardless of the consequences. He is hardworking & easy to talk too.
  2. To me realism is shown in the diner, pretty straight forward. The guy running to the Swede's house is more like a dream sequence of formalism. I'm scared as he passes all of those shadows. Then, the Swede speaks is a calm, disembodied voice & says thanks for coming over, & stay out of it, by saying, I did something wrong, once!
  3. This probably contributed to film noir by showing true crime. The voice over was effective, describing the farming scenes as we saw them.
  4. The first thing that I really notice is how RH voice drew JF's attention. Then how he rudely pushed a woman out of the way to see her. The dance is provocative, & a real mojo. I've read that when Miss H was married to Ali Khan, this was the scene that drew him to her. Miss H was nothing like Gilda, she was shy & withdrawn. Mr. K had to periodically view this scene to revive his interest in her. Next JF roughly handles her, out of anger, because she's tormenting him by acting provocative. He's embarrassed because all the boys will think that he hooked up with a 'Ho that any man can have
  5. The only thing that I can say, is that I've always thought of Mildred Pierce as noir. Miss Crawford is an amazing actress! She is so convincing as a caring, moral woman! After reading her daughter's book, it only makes her talent more apparent. The only thing bad that I noticed was her signature padded shoulders looked unusually broad.
  6. The opulent apartment is a study of furnishings, the actors are are a study of faces. I particularly liked how the detective smirked at Lydecker when he rose from the bath! Lydecker is effectively introduced when he is narrating about Laura's murder, then he introduces himself by name. This introduction is unusual in noir, because usually we see the character before we hear them.
  7. This detective is one step ahead of this imposter. Seeing that they can help each other he negotiates solving the case. The usual film noir business starts out as classy lady tries to get over on street wise guy. They end up working together & solving a mystery & possibly falling in love.
  8. POV was effective to me because we got to see what he sees, hear what he thinks, & follow his reasoning. POV added to the tension to me because from the driver's stance, I can't see the perp, I can only hear him, so I'm wondering what his face looks like, especially his expressions.
  9. What adds to the darkness of this film for me is the appearance of sweat & dirt on their uniforms, it being so loud that the have to use sign language to communicate, it being so windy that they have to wear goggles & the wisps of white smoke everywhere.
  10. What adds to the darkness of this film for me is the appearance of sweat & dirt on their uniforms, it being so loud that the have to use sign language to communicate, it being so windy that they have to wear goggles & the wisps of white smoke everywhere.
  11. The foreshadowing of something going wrong to me is the children using a rhyme about a butcher to eliminate each other from the game. The girl's mother working to better her child, loving placing the napkin on the table just so, while she is talking to the stranger ( like the man in the rhyme) & the disobedience of the children.
  12. Well, I've seen this before & im a rabid fan of Bette Davis. Look at her face when she realizes she's shot him.
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