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Brittawnée Enos

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    18
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About Brittawnée Enos

  • Rank
    Member
  • Birthday 02/05/1984

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Brooklyn, New York
  1. The first time I ever lit up (as a joke) several people told me I looked like a classic film star and from then on I was hooked. I even dated a guy for a time who always lit two cigarettes and handed me one and though I'm almost positive he's never seen Now, Voyager (my favorite Bette Davis film) I was hooked on him too. Luckily I broke both habits. Smoke free for four years! but yes, once a smoker always a smoker. Somethin' about the way smoke gets in your eyes.
  2. The Daily Doses have been extremely helpful in my noir journey. In approaching this course, I initially found it easy to lean towards watching films with directors and actors that I was already familiar with. The DD however, introduced me to films that I may not have sought out in the Friday line-ups. In addition, while providing me with a line of enquiry that gave me clues as to what elements I should be paying attention to, the DD also allowed me to gain insight through my classmates' perspectives and pushed me to reformulate my own. I've enjoyed all aspects of this course immensely and will
  3. I really enjoyed this scene as a fan of Raymond Burr's performance in Rear Window. In that picture we watch his expression evolve incrementally as Jeff tries to stave off his approach through the use of flashbulbs. Between each flash of light we see his irritation mounting and he becomes increasingly menacing. Similarly here, while the beating moves offscreen, the swinging light throws his face into high relief every few seconds. Each time he is illuminated, his detached expression gradually changes to one of deep satisfaction and malicious enjoyment. Even the thug next to him looks at him in
  4. I think Miles Davis' jazz music here conveys a sense of longing. We're witnessing a lovers' tryst but at a distance, both of them apart from one other but wanting to be together. Then as the music starts, we lose the dialogue as if we are not privy to what we are eavesdropping on. The camera pans back at a distance and it's as if we're intruding on a neighbor's intimate space. The music's yearning tones allow us to experience their longing for one another while the long shot point of view simultaneously makes us beg for a closer look. We the viewers have become voyeurs, from the outside lookin
  5. If freedom is among Porfirio's defining terms of the positive aspects of existentialism how much deeper would one go into the negative aspects of loneliness, dread, and nausea when freedom is forcibly taken away? This clip evokes all of these emotions through a masterful combination of sight and sound. The limited and quavering viewpoint immediately makes one feel disoriented and fraught with claustrophobia. The score inextricably woven with the sounds of the siren add to the increasing apprehension. And when the protagonist is revealed she is set apart from the other women, fearful, alone and
  6. I'm so glad you posted Philip French's article from the Guardian about Edward Hopper's influence on and having been influenced by films noir! This is clearly evidenced in this clip, not just in the desolate diner counter evocative of Nighthawks or by the shoreline visible in the distant background which was characteristic of so many of Hopper's works, but the exterior shots are a dead ringer for his 1940 piece Gas. I especially love that during the scene in the diner the frame is split down the middle by the countertop, Garfield on one side and the propieter on the other...will he accept e
  7. No femme fatale or honied heroine seems to be complete without a dynamite fur coat too. I love 40s fashion! I own sevfauxral.
  8. I think it's important to note too that while under contract within the studio system many of these people found themselves working with each other time and time again. Though not quite falling into the metaphor of the system being an assembly line, having the same elements or talent come together multiple times allowed them to really get to know one another. We see this not just in acting pairings (Bogey and Bacall, Lorre and Greenstreet) but also between directors and writers (Howard Hawks and Leigh Brackett) and cinematographers and directors (John Alton and Anthony Mann) among many others.
  9. I think that Lang used the imagery of clocks and the concept of time quite a bit throughout his films. In Metropolis when Freder relieves the exhausted man at the Machine, the hands that he must manipulate resemble the hands of a clock. The faster the machine makes him move, the more we sense that time is running out. Time is also a theme throughout M. The cuckoo clock first alerts us at the beginning of the film that something is amiss. Later one of the criminal element, a thief is seen with six watches. Where to start looking for the murderer? Nearer to the climax of the film, we hear t
  10. In addition to the role reversal of the villain narrating the film, Lydecker also has some omniscient qualities to him. He tells Det. McPherson to stop touching his things as if he were watching him even though he's in another room with the door closed. He reveals that he knows some rather personal information about McPherson as well and then proceeds to toy with him a little as he gets out of the bath. It's clear who has the upper hand here.
  11. Could this also be because many of the jazz musicians of the time were African American? Not only were many of Hollywood's films of the period largely white washed, but jazz didn't really transgress it's subversive nature until artists like Elvis Presley (rock and roll) and later Led Zeppelin (ska) began appropriating its forms.
  12. For those of you taking the course without the benefit of cable (like me), M and La Bête Humaine are on Hulu and a handful of this week's other films are on Amazon Instant Rental for 2.99 each. Not ideal, but in this case half a dozen or so films are cheaper than a ticket to the movies!
  13. For those of you taking the course without the benefit of cable (like me), M and La Bête Humaine are on Hulu and a handful of this week's other films are on Amazon Instant Rental for 2.99 each. Not ideal, but in this case half a dozen or so films are cheaper than a ticket to the movies!
  14. In the beginnings of both M and Dark Passage the killers' identities elude us. Whereas the killer in M is introduced merely as a shadow, the quick jump of POV in Dark Passage allows us to become the killer. Save for a brief shot from behind and the radio description we don't know what he looks like but we are already wearing his shoes, thinking his thoughts, and especially feeling his emotions. The anxiety and fear are palpable. We have no choice but to hope that he escapes. Whether or not he IS in fact a killer as the news bulletin alleges remains to be discovered, but as an escaped convict t
  15. In the beginnings of both M and Dark Passage the killers' identities elude us. Whereas the killer in M is introduced merely as a shadow the quick jump of POV in Dark Passage allows us to become the killer. Save for a brief shot from behind and the radio description we don't know what he looks like but we are already wearing his shoes, thinking his thoughts, and especially feeling his emotions. The anxiety and fear are palpable. We have no choice but to hope that he escapes. Whether or not he IS in fact a killer as the news bulletin alleges remains to be discovered but as an escaped convict the
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