Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

BryarT

Members
  • Content Count

    8
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About BryarT

  • Rank
    Newbie
  1. Beyond The mask on the wall is the one face/furnishing that grabs Det. McPherson's attention the most: the clock. Even in Lydecker's narration, he States that only two of them exist in the world, and both he and the murdered Laura own each. Clearly, one or both clocks play an important role in the story in some way later in the film. Lydecker is introduced narrating first, mostly on his side of Laura's murder, then on McPherson looking at the "lavish" decor of his apartment. Once he's had his fill, Lydecker calls him in, retelling his side of what he's done through written word (that McPhers
  2. Beyond The mask on the wall is the one face/furnishing that grabs Det. McPherson's attention the most: the clock. Even in Lydecker's narration, he States that only two of them exist in the world, and both he and the murdered Laura own each. Clearly, one or both clocks play an important role in the story in some way later in the film. Lydecker is introduced narrating first, mostly on his side of Laura's murder, then on McPherson looking at the "lavish" decor of his apartment. Once he's had his fill, Lydecker calls him in, retelling his side of what he's done through written word (that McPhers
  3. One of the big things noir films are known for is stark angles, giving a cool, other-worldly comic book look to the story. "Dark Passage" successfully achieves this by making you think it'll play like normal from the get-go (The fingers out of the barrel; Vincent walking out and away from the barrel), but then turns on it's head by forcing the audience to not only be in the situation with Vincent, but by making us become Vincent. At that point, WE are running from The police and knocking out strangers. Much like "The Letter", it is unclear what's behind the main character's criminal origins.
  4. Yeah, that first gunshot grabbed my attention, but it was her utter disdain for the guy that got me with her 5 follow-up shots that really takes the scene! One major contribution could be opening on a crime with ambiguous reasons and answers as to why the actions take place, creating the mystery around the motives. Something also pretty interesting (considering I have yet to see this film) is the weird form of trust that the workers have for her after she shoots the man, even going so far as to get others involved. These elements, along with many great shots (tracking from the moon, to the
  5. Yeah, that first gunshot grabbed my attention, but it was her utter disdain for the guy that got me with her 5 follow-up shots that really takes the scene! One major contribution could be opening on a crime with ambiguous reasons and answers as to why the actions take place, creating the mystery around the motives. Something also pretty interesting (considering I have yet to see this film) is the weird form of trust that the workers have for her after she shoots the man, even going so far as to get others involved. These elements, along with many great shots (tracking from the moon, to the
  6. The film's realistic depiction of a train traveling gives us a sense that we are in a world that operates as realistically as ours does. We not only see a train traveling to a destination (revealed to us later), but it's HOW the train is getting there via our main characters displaying their work synchronicity along the way. The "darker touches" could be from the angles of the train as it barrels down the tracks: shots from it blasting past an outside stationary watching it go further and further, to the camera hugging tightly against the engine from the outside to its wheels chugging along.
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...