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sreggie

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About sreggie

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    Member
  • Birthday 11/16/1957

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    http://classicmovieman.blogspot.com/
  • Yahoo
    sreggie@sbcglobal.net

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    Male
  • Location
    Chicago, IL
  • Interests
    I'm interested in classic film of all genres. I enjoy writing for my blog and promoting classic films through monthly film events.
  1. Powell’s dancing seems light and effortless, where Keeler’s dancing seems heavy and difficult. With Keeler I get the impression that the dancing is hard (and it probably is), but with Powell, she makes it seem easy (maybe I could do that, except for the back bends!). Powell is an all around dancer, able to master and incorporate several styles into her tap, where Keller has one style that she keeps repeating.
  2. I think the casting of Bergman and Grant in #Notorious confirms and challenges their movie personas; we reflexively like them because of their glamour and fame, so we’re willing to go with them on what for both is a darker journey. For a good portion of the film, I really can't stand Grant's arrogance and contempt for Bergman's character (I'm pulling for her the whole time though), but it all makes sense in the end. The movie is so complex: the Bergman and Grant characters are damaged from the beginning and it seems they both need to hit bottom before they can realize their true feeling fo
  3. Q: 1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? A: The way the shot is constructed makes me feel nervous. I'm in the two boys' shoes and the headmaster's office seems huge and the walk to his desk takes forever. Q: 2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? A: It adds to the tension and suspense of the scene. You feel like you're in the heads of the two guys in the room. It intensifies the nervous tension. 3. What connections (visual technique
  4. Q: 1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? A: Both films start with interesting or intriguing visuals that grab your attention immediately. Both openings feature women (a group of women performers in The Pleasure Garden and one woman in close-up in The Lodger). Q: 2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytellin
  5. Q: How are the “entrances” of John Garfield and Lana Turner staged in this sequence? What do their “entrances” reveal about their character? A: John Garfield comes on the scene as a hitch-hiker, someone who appears to be a drifter. He’s got an ordinary everyman quality to him. Lana Turner on the other hand, enters the scene like a goddess. She’s dressed in white shorts, top, and turban. And like a goddess, she’s aloof, but aware of her impact on men; she’s bothered by the fact that Garfield’s character didn’t fall at her feet in worship (he’ll do that later!). Q: What are some of the noir
  6. Q: How are the “entrances” of John Garfield and Lana Turner staged in this sequence? What do their “entrances” reveal about their character? A: John Garfield comes on the scene as a hitch-hiker, someone who appears to be a drifter. He’s got an ordinary everyman quality to him. Lana Turner on the other hand, enters the scene like a goddess. She’s dressed in white shorts, top, and turban. And like a goddess, she’s aloof, but aware of her impact on men; she’s bothered by the fact that Garfield’s character didn’t fall at her feet in worship (he’ll do that later!). Q: What are some of the noir
  7. Q: How does this opening sequence establish Humphrey Bogart as Philip Marlowe? What do we learn about Marlowe in these first few moments of the film? A: We see a confident man who seems comfortable in his own skin. We learn very quicky that he’s not very tall, he’s a private detective, likes brandy, he’s 38, went to college, and used to work for the district attorney’s office until he got fired for insubordination. Q: Do you see a difference in Bogart’s portrayal of Marlowe compared to his performance as Spade in The Maltese Falcon? A: Marlowe seems to be a little more relaxed than the S
  8. Q: What mood or atmosphere—through the visual design and the voiceover narration—is being established in this realistic documentary sequence? A: The introduction starts out as a Southern California agricultural history lesson and then the narration changes to reveal that this is going to be a story about Mexican workers victimized by unscrupulous people. Q: What do you think documentary realism adds to the evolution and increased range of the film noir style? A: It adds a sense of immediacy (you are there!), that hooks your interest almost immediately. Q: In what ways can the opening
  9. Q: What are some of the influences you see in this sequence from other cinemas (such as German expressionism) or other art forms? For example, consider this scene in relation to the work of Fritz Lang (who also worked at UFA). A: The opening shot of the outside the diner has the camera positioned low and tilted at an angle. The realistic tough-guy dialogue and the interesting shot of the toughs leaving the diner and walking across the street to their car. Q: How does this sequence shift its visual design from realism to formalism, as it moves from the diner to the Swede’s room? A: When N
  10. Q: What did you notice about Rita Hayworth's performance when you were watching this scene? A: You get the sense that Hayworth's character may have had a few drinks before this performance. As smooth as it is, she seems to be acting out. The striptease is very seductive, but you don't see very much. She removes two gloves and a necklace. It's kind of a metaphor that let's the audience know there is more to this character than has hitherto been revealed. Q: What are some of the deeper layers of meaning that are contained in this film noir musical sequence? A: As mentioned above, we on
  11. Q: How do you feel the noir influence operates in this scene from Mildred Pierce? A: The interior scenes have wonderful light and shadows, including the window blinds casting a great shadow (A foreshadow of the jail bars in Veda's future?) behind Mildred (Crawford). Both actresses are dressed in black, which helps make the mood seem somber and serious. Q: How does Curtiz arrange these two actresses to heighten the tension of the scene? Pay attention to how they move and how they are framed in the scene, especially the use of close-ups. A: The scene starts with Veda (Blyth) on the couch i
  12. Dick Powell's Marlowe is cool and confident. He smartly determines that Miss Allison is really Ann Grayle. Perhaps Ann was a little too put together for a reporter from the Post and perhaps her nails were too perfectly manicured to type her own stories. she definitely looks more like an heiress than a reporter. The dialogue is sharp and purposeful. Marlowe locks Ann in the office to make sure he gets the information he wants and succeeds, moving the plot forward.
  13. Q: What examples do you see that fit with Nino Frank's contention that Laura is a "charming character study of furnishings and faces?" A: The opening focuses on the luxurious NY City apartment of Waldo Lydecker, which is filled with interesting furnishings and faces, including a wall of African masks and other artifacts. The detective, Mark McPherson is handsome and well dressed. Lydecker's bathroom is like his apartment, "lavish," with details like monogrammed towels and a bathtub desk for his typewriter. Lydecker also gives us some background on McPherson and his exploits in a case, Waldo c
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