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chelseaguy5050

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  1. This is actually the second time Rita sings "Put the Blame on Mame" in Gilda. The first is after hours at the club. Rita sings as she plays the guitar.but otherwise she is stationary. She is singing to get Glenn's attention...to physically wake him up. The only other presence is the washroom attendant from the club. In the black dress Rita pulls out all the stops. In contrast to her first performance she is almost constantly in motion and she works the entire room, mesmerizing the entire audience...almost daring them to look away...knowing they can't. Again Gilda is singing to try
  2. The openings of the two Lang films, M and Ministry of Fear both rely heavily on the use of sound. In M the sound of the children playing is comforting, reassuring to the mothers. In Ministry of Fear the ticking of the clock is sinister, almost threatening...maddening. The music over the credits of Ministry combines with the simple ticking of the clock to become infused with a whole other meaning. Instead of being soothing, comforting, and rhythmical it's ominous, creating an atmosphere of dread and claustrophobia. When the camera finally pulls back it reveals a room that's shadowy, dark,
  3. What Nino Frank says about the Philip Marlowe of "Murder My Sweet" being a different kind of private eye is evident on many levels. Dick Powell as Marlowe is more personally invested... when Ann Shirley asks him who cares about who stole the emeralds he replies that he does. It's personal. Powell can be ruthless. Note the way he goes after Ann Shirley, even resorting to physical violence, to find out what he wants to know. He leads her into a trap and then springs it to get a look at her bankbook. From the moment they meet they are too close in each others personal spaces to be conduct
  4. As the camera lovingly, preciously pans across Waldo's apartment we see all of the beautiful things he has collected and from the way he's talking about his relationship with Laura we see that he had "collected" her too. I don't want to spoil it for anyone but there is an important clue we're made aware of almost immediately in the opening shot. As for Waldo receiving McPherson while he's taking a bath...It's a really unique way of greeting ones "guests." If you notice, when he realizes who McPherson is he stands up and Dana Andrews looks at him naked and smirks. Waldo also wants the up
  5. The opening POV sequence sets the whole tone for the movie.and immediately pulls/yanks us into the story. Your interest is piqued right away and the director plays with us and makes us wait to finally see Bogie and not just hear his voice. The slow disclosure rivets our attention and we're anxious to see what's going to happen next.. By not seeing the Bogart character right away what's happening seems almost unclear...jumbled and it's unclear where the story is going next. You don't know who his friends are and who's on the level. I guess it's only fair since he doesn't either. and it's
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