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Jonny B. Goode

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About Jonny B. Goode

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  1. I posted this two weeks ago, it was on another site. (http://forums.tcm.com/index.php?/topic/54111-the-noir-est-of-all-film-noir-flicks/) Good graphic.
  2. I couldn't agree more. And don't forget what the Chairman said:
  3. Oddly enough, the fedora was originally a woman's hat, made popular by the opera Fédora, and adopted by the women's rights movement. They became a popular style for men when Britain's Prince Edward started wearing them.
  4. http://differencegenie.com/trilby-vs-fedora-hats/ This lady has it mostly right, though most trilbys these days are patterned cloth or canvas, no longer felt. I've never seen a cloth fedora, and straw ones are usually called Panama hats. Incidentally, both hats are descended from the Bavarian Tyrolean hunting cap, also known as an Alpine hat.
  5. Yes, that's a trilby. It was popular in the 60s with the jet setters and hipsters. I've seen a pic of Sinatra wearing one, but he usually opted for fedoras and occasionally pork pies.
  6. All four of these films open in medias res, with someone with a dark past stepping out of the darkness. We are immediately interested in knowing how things got to this point.
  7. Just as a point of order, from a long-time fedora-wearing dieselpunk (and member of The Fedora Lounge and editor at dieselpunks.org): Please, don't go buying a trilby and mistaking it for a fedora. Most people today call those little canvas hats with the narrow brim (hence their alternate name in the UK, the "stingy brim" hat) and creased crown that hipsters wear "fedoras". A real fedora is made of felt, has a pinched crown and a wider (1 1/2 inches or more) brim. Hopefully this advice will prevent a few people from making a tragic mistake.
  8. This week, Mental Floss examines the elements that go into the making of a film noir, and decide that Double Indemnity is, hands-down, the most noir of all film noir. Then they poll 12 film critics, who come up with the same answer. (Or rather, it ties for first with Out of the Past and A Touch of Evil). The nice infographic is worth the visit, and it dovetails with this week's class study rather nicely. http://mentalfloss.com/article/65884/noir-est-all-film-noir-flicks
  9. The camera angles were almost surreal and made the whole scene frustrating, in the truest and earliest sense of the word (the uneasiness felt by viewing odd angles like a "frustrated" cone or triangle (a triangle with one end lopped off forming a parallelogram with awkwardly sloping sides)). Coupled with the already-odd angles and slopes of the streets and buildings, it reminded me of a real-life Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.
  10. I liked the low angle zoom to a close-up on Greenstreet, becoming a monstrous form dominating the screen. Greenstreet clearly dominates this scene. Or at least he thinks he does, in his mind. Lorre's character however shows little regard for Greenstreet's imposing presence, invasion of space or his weapon; he casually says he's going to go to bed, and then nonchalantly lays back chaise-style, showing Greenstreet he's totally unflapped by the intrusion.
  11. I liked the low angle zoom to a close-up on Greenstreet, becoming a monstrous form dominating the screen. Greenstreet clearly dominates this scene. Or at least he thinks he does, in his mind. Lorre's character however shows little regard for Greenstreet's imposing presence, invasion of space or his weapon; he casually says he's going to go to bed, and then nonchalantly lays back chaise-style, showing Greenstreet he's totally unflapped by the intrusion.
  12. Funny you mentioned The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Dr. Edwards, because I was thinking exactly that before you said it.
  13. The large straw hat was an interesting wardrobe choice. As she left the light for the dark, it momentarily caught the sun from behind and lit up underneath like a halo.
  14. As everyone else has noted, Bogart plays Spade as "two-fisted"; an imposing figure not afraid to use his muscle to get to a resolution of his case. Marlowe, on the other hand, while still a hard-boiled "working stiff", is a bit more cerebral in his approach; he uses his intellect and wit as his muscle. Also noticed, when General Sternwood's daughter came out, the camera lingers on her a moment, moving up and down her figure. When it returns to Marlowe, you can tell he had been doing the same, as his eyes are clearly at the bottom of her long legs and working their way back up.
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