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Fiks

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About Fiks

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  1. I can't seem to find today's assignment (day 2). It's 4:45 p.m. eastern time and I'm wondering where it might be!
  2. I thought the clip was great and reminded me of other gags I've seen in movies with Abbot and Costello and Laurel and Hardy. I remember the crazy things that Lucille Ball used to do in I Love Lucy and it's all connected to these beginnings.
  3. It feels like I'm watching a newsreel with the voiceover by the narrator giving me the facts. Credibility is boosted by telling us the story is based on facts provided by the Immigration and Naturalization Department of Justice. I found this to be very unlike the other clips we have watched so far and it has opened my eyes a bit to other possibilities in which film noir style can show up. I'm not sure that I really loved this opening, but I'm willing to explore this documentary realism a bit more.
  4. I love the scene with Nick and Swede, what a demonstration in contrast. Nick is standing, Swede is lying in his bed, Nick is nearly frantic in his actions and speech, while Swede is calm and almost fatalistic. Nick's face is lit while Swede is in darkness...in fact we don't know who Swede is. The lighting from the open door, the stillness of Swede's bedroom, the lack of movement, the angle of the shots all combine to give that Noir feel. As in many of the daily doses, I'm left with so many questions: Who is Swede? What has he done? Who has he done it to? It's got me hooked. Can't wait to watch.
  5. Wow, what an incredible scene. Whenever I think of this movie I think of that scene. It just burns the screen. Her sex appeal, her seduction, her playfulness keep you mesmerized. Not only does her body sizzle but her hair plays a role as well. Just the way she moves her had and plays with her hair has you glued to the screen. You quickly learn that this whole production was really to get at Johnny whom she obviously loves and cares about. I love the music and how much of the story is told in just that song. It does forward the action in the movie and is very much an important part of the film.
  6. The contrast between mother and daughter is established in the very first conversation. Veda's glib, uncaring and mocking attitude contrasted by Mildred's serious and responsible tone and demeanour. The music and the darkness of the scene lends itself to the visual impact of film noir. The obsessive, selfish nature of Veda make her a perfect femme fatale. The music also adds so much to the mood. It is kind of circular and begins to build adding to the tension of the scene. The slap is my favourite part of the movie! You can hear and see the hate in Veda's voice, stance and actions. I do think that Veda is in control of the scene for the most part but the tables turn after the slap. Mildred suddenly sees Veda for who she really is. The mood, the passion, and the cynicism all influence this film in the film noir style.
  7. I found the opening of this film to be very stark and foreboding. The never ending movement of the pendulum (on the clock), the unstoppable ticking, then the ominous music begins as the credits are shown. All of that really got my heart ticking! As in M the movie begins with only the sounds of the scene, a clock ticking in this film and children singing in M. There is no dialogue until later. A clock plays a significant role in both films, here literally ticking away the time and in M the cuckoo clock sounds the time for the children being released from school to head home for lunch. The "real" action begins after we see the clock in both films. As Ray Milland sits watching the clock I felt the isolation, the being alone, that he must have experienced. The lighting, the sounds, the music the shots, the setting all came together to create a mood of loneliness. I'm not surprised he wanted to get lost in a crowd.
  8. What an opening line! You know the ending, when you've just started watching the film. So much gets discovered in just the first few minutes of the film. There's been a murder, Laura has died, Lydecker is the only one who really knew her, Lydecker knew how Laura was going to die before she actually died, that Detective McPherson will stop at nothing to get his man/woman and that Lydecker was writing Laura's story. We also get a glimpse at Lydeckers personality through the furnishings and faces of his home. He's a collector, a perfectionist, self centred, self important (?), integral character to the plot. The manner in which Lydecker is introduced to us starts out to be somewhat similar to other films noir i.e. voiceover and description of what he's observing the Detective doing, we soon get a sense of his eccentricity when we actually see him. I found the voiceover great at the beginning, as if I was the observer, watching through the opening in the door. Although there weren't many quick shots as in other film noir, the overall mood of the clip was sinister. Why did Laura die? How did Laura die? Who killed Laura? Although I've seen this film before, I'm really looking forward to watching it again with new eyes.
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