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SashaNYC

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  1. What did you notice about Rita Hayworth's performance when you were watching this scene? She is full of life, unstoppable- men and women love her, the reaction around her is predictable: using her female power and joy of life, she controls men and provokes other women's admiration. Glen Ford's anxiety seems out of place. What are some of the deeper layers of meaning that are contained in this film noir musical sequence? I remember watching this scene at about 12 years of age and wanting to be Gilda- the identification with her is complete. Gilda understands the hypocrisies of the world
  2. Here are a couple of point I found 1. Characters driven by lust and greed, which eventually and unavoidably 2. brings their downfall (the feeling they are trapped in their circumstance and doomed to fall) 3. the type of noir women - either as bad as can be or very naive (usually the good natured naive ones are spared the impending fall 4. The psychological angle- film noir is more about the interior life of character than about action - the story is an excuse to show the lower depths of human beings 5. Moral choices- the noir protagonists often face a moral choice - in this case Mildred
  3. Here are a couple of point I found 1. Characters driven by lust and greed, which eventually and unavoidably 2. brings their downfall (the feeling they are trapped in their circumstance and doomed to fall) 3. the type of noir women - either as bad as can be or very naive (usually the good natured naive ones are spared the impending fall 4. The psychological angle- film noir is more about the interior life of character than about action - the story is an excuse to show the lower depths of human beings 5. Moral choices- the noir protagonists often face a moral choice - in this case Mildred
  4. How do you feel the noir influence operates in this scene from Mildred Pierce? By now, having read a bit on the technological restriction, the A-B list distribution strategy and the B movie budgets available for a plentiful of black and white films, I gather one can expect noir visual style to permeate the fils of the period. That we get in Mildred Pierce. However, there is a two key elements of noir in Mildred Pierce- first we have a character driven by lust and greed at the center of the story The we have the role of women in noir- they are either bad as baddest can get or very naive and v
  5. How would you compare the opening of M to the opening of Ministry of Fear? We step into the uncomfortable situation right away - we are told about the danger, but the warning goes unheard- as the victims carelessly focus on having fun. Visually, it is the same style, even the design of the sets, dark, constraint (reflecting that the characters are trapped), the set are made to represent a real place, but look staged- as if we were living in a dream, rather a nightmare. By the end of the scene we know that the characters will meet the foretold danger face to face. Describe in your own wor
  6. Marlow's behavior clearly shows he is in the fridge of legality - for starters he locks Anne Grayle in his office. He is one step ahead of her- perhaps making up for being one step behind the night before, when ambushed during the failed jewelry delivery - noir cat and mouse game, in which players are making the rules as they go. Yet, Marlow has an ethical code- he wants to finish his assignment, even if the client is dead (or perhaps he is rationalizing his curiosity and/or looking for a bigger payment? - duality - another element of noir). He is, of course, a small ticket private detective e
  7. From this weeks' lecture" How would we go about defining the term 'film noir.' For our purposes, we are looking at a body of films made in the 1940s and 1950s. There is no general agreement as to what are the common elements that define these films because it depends on whether you consider film noir a genre, a style or a movement or cycle of films" It's interesting that we start with Laura- I often wondered if Laura is an authentic "Film noir" - for starters- the opening- the weekend of Laura's murder - shows a beautiful apartment, with plenty of sunshine. The windows to the balcony are open
  8. "It was the weekend Laura died" We know Lydecker loves Laura- her dead is the reference point of his life - (BL and AL - before and after Laura) I read the comments about the homosexuality of Lydecker- he never appeared to me so much as gay, than as transexual - a men in the body of a woman - he projects himself in Laura, and his love for her is a reflection of his narcissistic self-absorption. I think back in the 40s there was not a deep understanding of LGTB orientation for writers to see the difference.
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