Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

IWannaThankTheAcademy

Members
  • Content Count

    21
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About IWannaThankTheAcademy

  • Rank
    Member
  1. I'll be more specific.... I tried the game on an iPad Pro AND on a desktop iMac. I got everything to work (i.e., it did not freeze), but it took several "refreshes" for the individual tap sequences to play. The problem I had on BOTH devices was that when I went to check on my choices for the sequence to see if they were correct, I clicked to get the answer, but it looked like the link to the answers was broken. I went nowhere and couldn't see if my answers were correct. I also never saw the other choices beyond "Anything Goes" (a favorite of mine anyway), so I suspect it was because I
  2. 1. With the exception of the massing of birds overhead as Melanie is ready to go into the store, you would have no idea this is going to be a dark film. The "meet cute" introduction is very much a romantic comedy staple, and the two characters play along with it. She's intrigued, and we don't yet know why he continues the game (other than her attractiveness) when she clearly doesn't have the knowledge about birds that he has. 2. I noticed the difference between the sound of the birds outside and the birds inside. Outside, while not completely menacing, the sound is a little more hars
  3. 1. Before you see the graphics, you hear the agitated and staccato strings of the orchestra. This is not going to be a smooth, leisurely film! The graphics echo so much of what's in the film -- dark/light lines; vertical/horizontal -- reminiscent of the "criss cross" of Strangers on a Train. The most obvious use of the lines is to foreshadow the split personalities of both Norman Bates and Marion Crane. Norman is clinically split, to the point that he even has full conversations with himself in the guise of his mother (including another voice). For Marion, it's more of a moral conflict --
  4. 1. The music starts first, and sets a tone of mystery with a lot of punctuation from dark brass sounds that are dissonant from the hypnotic tone of the rest of the opening of the score. The mood is definitely ominous, but also somewhat relaxing -- so it sets up that there are going to be a lot of conflicts in this film. 2. For me the single most powerful image is when the face is washed over with red, and the spiral begins in her eye. That is one arresting image, and it starts the sequence of all the different types of spirals. I find it interesting that the sequence with the spiral
  5. 1. The opening camera shot reminded me a bit of Peter Pan flying through a window. We start from inside the apartment, but since L.B. is asleep, this is an objective viewer's POV, and it moves over the window sill and out into the courtyard. The movement of the camera mimics a person's eye movements when taking it all in. We start with the music studio on the right and then move up and left to reveal all the other apartments and get a sense of who the players in this drama will be. I like how Hitchcock comes back to the apartment and we see Jimmy Stewart, and then he goes outside again.
  6. 1. The opening camera shot reminded me a bit of Peter Pan flying through a window. We start from inside the apartment, but since L.B. is asleep, this is an objective viewer's POV, and it moves over the window sill and out into the courtyard. The movement of the camera mimics a person's eye movements when taking it all in. We start with the music studio on the right and then move up and left to reveal all the other apartments and get a sense of who the players in this drama will be. I like how Hitchcock comes back to the apartment and we see Jimmy Stewart, and then he goes outside again.
  7. Wow -- some of the responses posted here are just great. I may not have as many new things to add, but here I go: 1. The most obvious image that manifests "criss cross" is the crossed rails. But there are also crossed legs when they sit on the train, and the clear criss cross of them arriving and walking from screen left to right or screen right to left. Everyone else has already mentioned a lot of other ways this theme is visually represented. 2. Shoes are the most obvious difference. Bruno's unusual choice in shoes hits a wrong note -- something is "off" -- these shoes don't go
  8. 1. Uncle Charlie (or "Mr. Spencer") is a slew of contradictions in the opening. He's in a seedy rooming house, but he's dressed up in a suit and tie, smoking what one assumes is a quality cigar. He's enormously peaceful and lowkey, but when he gets up, he smashes the water glass,so there's an underlying rage at something or someone. He seems unconcerned when the landlady tells him about the two men looking for him, but we find out he IS concerned when he looks through the window and says "You've got nothing on me." And he's careless about the money on the bedside table and on the floor.
  9. 1. The tone of the opening of Rebecca is very different from Hitchcock films of the British period. Even though The 39 Steps has a brief moment of ominousness when Hannay buys a ticket and we don't see anything but his shoes until a few minutes later, Rebecca is far more moody, with a specific dreamy quality, AND it has a voiceover narration. It's also a very private, secluded space that is being shown, when Hitchcock prior to this film usually used open public spaces in the beginnings of his films. And when you see Manderley, it immediately tells you there's a real story to this home -- i
  10. 1. The most obvious pattern is the shot of theater lights -- "Music Hall" in 39 Steps and "To Night Golden Curls" in The Lodger. Also, a theatrical setting occurs in The Pleasure Garden as well as 39 Steps. But other than the very brief purchase of a ticket (at a canted ticket booth) and the lack of seeing a face, there's no real sense of doom here. It's certainly not the scream of The Lodger or even the foreboding of Downhill. This LOOKS like an ordinary scene during a night out at the theater. 2. Not yet having watched the film, I can't tell if Hannay is an innocent character or n
  11. 1. I definitely think the characters will be more important. I actually "tuned out" the dialogue as the skier, the man and the girl were walking along, because I just felt that whatever they were saying wasn't that important. It was all about the establishment of relationships. 2. The introduction of Abbott is quite genial, considering he's going to be the villain of the piece. But the man "doth protest too much" methinks, because he's just been hit hard, and he's completely brushing it off. I would have expected more hesitancy, so it felt like he was trying to take away attention fr
  12. I watched Blackmail several years ago, and while I've forgotten most of the film and look forward to seeing it again, I definitely remembered the "knife" scene, seen in the Daily Dose clip. I'm a big fan of silent film and am especially interested in early talkies, because so many of them got worse as directors and writers and creative team members focused almost exclusively on the sound (like putting microphones in vases conveniently placed in the middle of tables where actors just "happened" to be), and forgot about the rest of the story. Since Hitchcock at this (and even later stages) was
  13. I thought the POV dolly shots were actually very subtle. These were not long, drawn out shots -- but they had an impact nonetheless. I too (like others) got this sense of dread as the young woman moved toward the two boys. She was in the center and everything else just dropped away. You can't help but be anxious when watching this. As for why Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot, it's clear that he is working with film in a new way. Cameras were so static at this time -- people came into the scene and left it, and there were cuts from wide shots to medium shots. Hitchcock
  14. I love the way Hitchcock used so many elements to build up the intensity of the jealousy brewing in the husband's mind about his wife with the champion boxer. It starts with just some minor revelry -- falling into laps, a few energetic female dancers and then within seconds the scene speeds up -- more revelers partake, the dancing is faster (as is the music, but I'm not really including the music as it could be different depending on where you were watching a film), the cuts are shorter. Then he starts using montage as distortion -- from the keys to the generally blurred scene, and finally w
  15. I am a big fan of Hitchcock, and have actually seen many of the silent films mentioned in the opening segments of the course....EXCEPT for "The Pleasure Garden." Thanks to whoever posted the link to the full film on YouTube! I notice many people on this forum are either completely unfamiliar with Hitchcock (welcome to a master) or only know his American movies from the late 40s and early 50s. You'll want to read (or watch the documentary) Francois Truffaut's lengthy interview with him -- it's a classic book and a must have if you're really serious about appreciating Hitchcock on multiple
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...