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Paul F.

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About Paul F.

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  • Birthday 03/09/1964

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    https://paul-t-fitzpatrick.blogspot.com/

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  1. Further insight is much better than a mere disclaimer! I love that Jacqueline Stewart is hosting; she can give the kind of insight that others could not. She may give the same kind of insight on the Our Gang films. We unfortunately do not pay for the tier that TCM is on, so we don't receive it in our house -- but I am still a vintage-film buff. I am fortunate to have our 77-library cooperative system which allows me to borrow so many vintage films for free!
  2. It is interesting that THE JAZZ SINGER is scheduled for April. With recent issues regarding blackface, it is surprising that TCM would want to touch it with a ten-foot pole. I like that Our Gang shorts are scheduled for April. I would like to see a tribute to Ernie Morrison, also known as "Sunshine Sammy," the first black actor to be signed to a long-term motion-picture contract (or so I have heard).
  3. Thanks, guys and gals! I will make it a point to watch SANTA FE TRAIL, as I think that is in my home because it was one of the DVDs my father had. I am also curious enough about MURDER, HE SAYS to keep that in mind! The Old South was probably so picturesque -- both in scenery and in costumes -- that filmmakers couldn't resist it.
  4. I saw JEZEBEL yesterday and I thought about how many films of that period seem to glorify the pre-Civil War South and the Confederacy. Were there any films at that time which took place in the North and perhaps portrayed slavery as a bad thing? It was an entertaining film, though. It was good to see that Eddie Anderson (Rochester) and Matthew Beard (Stymie) were in the cast.
  5. I videotaped it and haven't watched it yet. That is interesting if they showed part 2 first. I'm looking forward to watching it, regardless.
  6. Dolores Hart was an actress in Hollywood for several years, and her credits include two films with Elvis Presley. For over fifty years now, she has been a Benedictine nun, and she is now the Reverend Mother Dolores Hart. Doug Keck interviews her in a three-part series which is being shown Nov. 29 through Dec. 1 on EWTN, at 6:30 p.m. Eastern time.
  7. I have been wondering as to why everyone talks about James Cagney pushing a grapefruit into Mae Clarke's face in PUBLIC ENEMY, considering the horrible murders that take place in this film! There is one scene where Cagney coldly shoots his old friend to death while the man is playing the piano; the camera discreetly moves away before this happens (today, they would show it in the most gruesome detail). And then there is the gruesome ending of the film in which we see what happened to Cagney's character, which I will not spoil (I feel for his poor mother). Yet it was not these scenes that endur
  8. I have been wondering as to why everyone talks about James Cagney pushing a grapefruit into Mae Clarke's face in PUBLIC ENEMY, considering the horrible murders that take place in this film! There is one scene where Cagney coldly shoots his old friend to death while the man is playing the piano; the camera discreetly moves away before this happens (today, they would show it in the most gruesome detail). And then there is the gruesome ending of the film in which we see what happened to Cagney's character, which I will not spoil (I feel for his poor mother). Yet it was not these scenes that endur
  9. At the risk of being accused again of going off-topic, even though I didn't bring up these specific things (although I did bring up Huck Finn, and I kinda wish I hadn't), I must say this: The secular government saw slaves as property, but God saw them as human beings; therefore, helping slaves escape was a crime but not a sin. If some folks on behalf of religion said slavery was not wrong, then that is terrible. That's going along with the culture. All I will say about the throwaway line dissing Mother (soon to be St.) Teresa is that there are other ways to remember her than by way of Christo
  10. I am not sure as to how many "organized religions" would have said that it would have been a sin to help Jim escape, and that the right thing to do would be to return him. "Treat others the way you would have them treat you" was the Golden Rule even in the 19th century.
  11. I first read The Adventures of Tom Sawyer in sixth grade. Sister Loretta, I believe her name was, read it aloud to us. When we came to the "n" word, she explained that it was not a nice word. This was the 1975-1976 school year and I had never heard the word before. I liked the novel right away. I have currently been reading it again, and after I finish reading it, I hope to read, for the first time in its entirety, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. That one, I understand, is a book way ahead of its time. Apparently Huck slowly comes to get to know Jim as a person, and not as a slave.
  12. That is interesting, especially since this was during the late 1960s. In the 1970s, situation comedies on the socially-relevant kick would have some fun with that word, but of course it was black characters using the word, not white characters. Richard Widmark's character using that word toward Sidney Poitier's character certainly is upsetting to watch, but of course the movie didn't glorify that behavior. Today the taboo is so strong that the word can't even be referred to by name in the course of discussing it. When Barbara Walters referred to the word by name some years ago during a dis
  13. CaveGirl, if you’re referring to me, I never mentioned anything about banning films I don’t like. I responded legitimately to comments that naturally came up in discussions on the Legion of Decency. As a matter of fact, as a result of the discussion I was compelled to learn about the film RASPUTIN AND THE EMPRESS, starring the Barrymores. I watched the trailer (it played Broadway at $2 a ticket – wow!) and learned about the historic lawsuit pertaining to the film. So I got to defend the faith AND be introduced to a new (old) film. I would say that it was a fruitful discussion, which is what th
  14. As you know, films can be controversial for more than just prurient content. So I would like to add some discussion about films such as THE BIRTH OF A NATION, SONG OF THE SOUTH, and the Amos 'n' Andy movie CHECK AND DOUBLE CHECK. I saw THE BIRTH OF A NATION some years ago; I think it was on TCM. I would say that it is as problematic as its critics say it is. I believe I remember hearing about demonstations on college campuses where the film was to be shown in recent years. It may have been the biggest epic up to that time (1915), and of course D.W. Griffith's editing is celebrated. I recently
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