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jenikoterba

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About jenikoterba

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  1. I agree totally with you - the cerebral part is there but not the outright physical portion. I'm wondering if Woody Allen is also a polarizing comedian...not just for his personal actions...but because of the very dry cerebral humor and lack of physicality. His appeal has never seemed as wide to the masses as the others we have discussed. His humor is a little exhausting at times because the viewer needs to be plugged in to what the gag is because he's not always going to tip his hat with the physical aspect. 2. Do you agree or disagree with Mast in his view that Bananas more closely captures Sennett's style or spirit than The Great Race? I'd say from a cerebral standpoint, there is mirroring of the Sennett style - but from a physical standpoint, definitely 'no.' I'd have to split the difference between the two films. The physicality of Bananas is greatly restrained in comparison to the Sennett years and even to 'The Great Race.' Woody Allen's brand of humor really pushes toward the cerebral aspects of humor without the overt physical slapstick that we know so well from historical slapstick cinema.
  2. I love what Barracuda89 points out below about the attempts to fix a mistake....especially with the cue sticks, the physical comedy of tripping and trying to get them to be upright. I think Seller's comedy is so funny because I think all of us have a little of him in us.....you're trying to be taken seriously or do something simple, and you screw it up in front of someone and then you're rushed and can just make it more horrible. That's what makes me laugh even harder.
  3. One obvious evolution is involving other actors in the gag. It's one thing to slip on a banana peel by yourself, but to orchestrate rolling through the trap door in the fence and chasing around the fence, that takes careful blocking and timing. I'm guessing we are watching one of the original slapstick chase scenes too? How many times do we see variations of actors chasing each other around....and that is a whole other level of complexity.
  4. I'm trying to wrap my head around, "#3: Slapstick is ritualistic" and if it's lacking any repetition or ritual......is it not slapstick? And for that matter, if it's lacking any 1 of the 5? Is it simply not "authentic" slapstick?
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