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deborahwakid11

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About deborahwakid11

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  1. Hi, everyone: "Payment on Demand" is now available through the TCM website archive. This was Frances Dee's second film with Bette Davis. Take care. Happy New Year. Deborah
  2. Dear Cine Maven and Featio: "So Ends Our Night" is a wonderful film. My only complaint is that Frances is not in the film enough. There is a picture in one of my movie magazines of Fredric March and Frances eating ice cream together on the set of the film. Freddie is hysterical, wearing top hat and tails, but with long girls' pigtails hanging from the back of his head. It was a very serious movie, so I guess it lightened the mood on the set. Based on stills and pictures I've seen, I'm guessing Frances had a much larger role than was seen in the final film. I've seen pictures of her and March during their wedding, and also a still of Frances with the villian, Erich Von Stroheim, who menaced her husband and his pals in "Lost Squadron." Featio, it's been a long time. I've had computer troubles and did not really have time to post. The Frances Dee website has reemerged as remembering Frances Dee. Also, there are two lovely compilations on You Tube of Frances, including a screen legends one. Incidentally, Frances' centenniel was this past November 26. Happy birthday Frances. Take care. Deborah
  3. Dear CineMaven: I also adore Frances Dee. I have purchsed several of her films, even her first starring role in "Playboy of Paris." Frances was an original, as was her husband, Joel McCrea. I you have Fox Movie Channel, look out every so often for both "Blood Money" and "Half Angel." With the latter, you have to be careful that it is the 1936 version, since there are several movies of the same name. The name of the precode special was called "Complicated Women." She talked about making "Blood Money" right after "Little Women." No characters could be more different than Meg and Elaine. As Frances said, "Quite a departure. Also, the Frances Dee website has reopened as "Remembering Frances Dee." Take care. Deborah
  4. Hi, Fernando: Long time no talk to. I've been busy with school? I just wanted to tell you that I finall got see "Playboy of Paris" and was totally enchanted. Even though it was popular when released, not as popular as other Chevalier fare like "Big Pond." LaBelle Frances was just so funny and charming, as were Chevalier and Stu Erwin, everyone's favorite sidekick. The critics were so-so, but liked Frances' performance. However, Frances was kind of hard on herself in one interview, thinking she should have been more demure in the part. For my part, I think the way she played the part was great, kind of like a spoiled rich girl no one can please. Other Frances films I viewed recently were "Blood Money" and "Coast Guard," which I purchased. Also recently purchased "Crime of Century" and "Coming Out Party." I had actually purchased the former film earlier, but turned out to be the wrong "Crime of the Century," not the 1930's one advertised. I'm sure this one will be correct. Take care. Especially try to get a copy of "Blood Money." It's great. Take care. Deborah
  5. I would have to say the IMAX version of the "Nutcracker." What an extremely hideous film, and a waste of celluloid space. The little girl playing Klara was a spoiled brat who needed to be grounded a good, long time. But then, the music was even destroyed. And, in the famous battle of nutcracker and the mouse king, they are not playing the piece played in the ballet at that moment. Instead, of all things, they are playing the "1812 Overture." I was laughing my head off. Then, there is the Sugar Plum Fairy. Instead of a dainty little creature, you get a baker who looks suspicously like Julia Child. Equally turdish, on the small screen, was that incredibly horrible remake of "Wizard of Oz" with Muppets. I adore Brandy and Queen Latifah, and I expected something good. Instead, I got a version where Toto, instead of being an adorable dog, cat, fish, monkey, or whatever, guess what Toto was. None other than a prawn. Can you imagine Judy Garland walking down the Yellow Brick Road with a shrimp! Egads. For non-IMAX or TV, the prize goes to "Rabbit Test," directed by Joan Rivers and starring Billy Crystal. I'll just use initials: POJ. Garbage, Incorporated. Take care. Deborah
  6. Hi, feaito: Sorry for so long for reply. Have been busy with school. Hope everything is fine with you.] Just to let everyone know: Fox Movie Channel has been showing "Blood Money" this year, which features la belle Frances in one of her few turns as a bad girl, bedeviling George Bancroft and everyone around her. The next showing of the film will be on December 1 (this Saturday) at 6:00 a.m. EST, I believe. Will have to check to be sure. Take care. Deborah
  7. Hi, everyone: Critics are okay, but their word is not law. I mean, let's face it. All critics tell you are their opinions. What all of us like is a matter of taste. Critics, to me, have one use: that is to give someone an idea of what the film is like, if nothing else. Do they deserve an exalted position, no? I can always tell when a certain local critic is going to like a movie, no matter what. Deep down, they may not like it, but if they think it showing something that coincides with their belief system, they will give it thumbs up. I really don't watch them that much anymore, usually because I can tell by looking a trailer whether I want to see a film or not. There are few that I do want to see, or if I do want to see, have time to see. Years ago, I watched Siskel and Ebert regularly. I used to agree more with Roger than Gene. Then in recent years, since Siskel's death, Ebert's opinion has become more like Gene's, which is okay. Unfortunately, the poor man has gone through a series of health problems. And, even if I don't agree, the show is always entertaining. On another note, if you see an ad saying "Critics praise so and so," without mention of critic, it's probably the studio doing it. As long as people watch critics shows, you will have critics. How much stock you put into what they say is the individual's own choice. I just think an inidivual's own opinion is the best judge of something most of the time. Take care. Deborah
  8. Hi, SPTO: Anything to make a buck in Hollywood, even if they don't make a buck doing it. Jennifer Garner is going to remake "Christmas In Connecticut." I've also heard a rumor of Jim Carrey remaking "Sullivan's Travels." Give me a break. One person asked, 'Whati s the difference between what Milli Vinilli did and actors who were lipsynched in the movies?" Well, in some ways it is the same, but in one big way it is different. The actors in films who were lipsyhnced by others were doing at least half of the job on screen: they were doing their own acting. I mean, let's face, how would you feel is you went to see "Producers" on Broadway and found out Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick were being lypsynched by someone backstage, a la "Singing In the Rain?:" How much is a Broadway ticket now. Spending $1,000 on a concert and the person spends more time talking about politics and singing? Milli Vinnilli were supposed to be singers. They signed a record deal. They should not have agreed to what agent wanted. However, nowadays, it's all about veneer over substance. True, most of the members of "Partridge Family" didn't sing, but Shirley Jones and David Cassidy did. "The Archies" were made up of singer Andy Kim, but he sang. While, I totally disagree with having nonsingers doing musical roles, a lot of times real-life singers were dubbed. Examples include Angela Lansbury (4 Tony awards), Alexis Smith (1 Tony), and of all people, Ann Blyth. She played Helen Morgan in a film. Gogi Grant dubbed her, which is odd, since Blyth sounded more like Morgan than Grant did. Oh, the amazement of what Hollywood does. Then there is the "King and I" and choice of Deborah Kerr. Now, I was named for Kerr. She is one of my faovrite actresses, and if it had been strictly dramatic, she would have been good. By the time film was made, Irene Dunne was too old, and Gertrude Lawrence was dead. Rogers and Hammerstein had a chance to have Maureen O'Hara as Anna (what great casting that would have been), but Oscar didn't want a woman who made "pirate movies" to play Anna. I guess Oscar never saw "How Green Was My Valley" or "Quiet Man." When a Broadway revival came along, O'Hara was offered the part, but turned down Rogers, said if she was not good enough originally, she was not good enough now. I blame the producers and record label more than Milli Vinnilli for what happened, although the two men could have not agreed to go along with it. It's just another attempt to try to make excuses for the errors of judgment and deceit that went on so many years ago. It's not a new story, either. There is going to be a film on that man who wrote the phony Howard Huges biography, Clifford Irving, who went to jail because of it. Considering the excuses made for "Million Little Pieces," if it happened today, people would come up with all sorts of garbage of why it happened. Someone hit it right on the head when they said the music industry is all about looks and a style, rather than any sort of musical talent. I agree 100%. As he pointed out, Paula Abdul's voice isn't the greatest (kind of whiny). And, what has Simon Cowel every done. Jennifer Hudson was better off not winning the competition, where everyone is expected to be size zero (both figure wise and mental wise). There seems to be this desire to see people made fun of, laugh at people, and say nasty things to them. Larry, I hate to say it, but I think you're right about the tragic Anna Nicole Smith. Is a TV movie of the week, if nothing else, on it's way. Anything for exploitation. What kills me is the audition tapes of "American Idol," which I've seen clips of. I mean, half of these people make my dad sound like Enrico Caruso. He sings more on key to our dog than these people do. Don't they realize they can't sing and are tone death. Do they enjoy being made fun of, or do they just want their five minutes of fame, no matter what. As far as I'm concerned, it's all exploitation. And, how many of these winners have absolutely made it. The fact that you can vote more than once tells it all. Well, "Dancing With Stars" is going to air opposite Idol; so, we get more amusement for those "reality TV show" people. Heather Mills is one of the celebrities. Actually, if I had to choose betwene the two, I would pick "Stars." I just don't watch network TV. Even Anna Nicole Smith had a reality (unreality, really show). How's the weather up in Canada, Larry. We've had a lot of snow in Chicago. Baseball season is just around the corner, and the Cubs have come up with another curse. This time it's the George M. Cohan-Murphy curse. They got to have some reason for not winning championship in (going on) 99 years. Take care. Deborah`
  9. Hi, SPTO: Anything to make a buck in Hollywood, even if they don't make a buck doing it. Jennifer Garner is going to remake "Christmas In Connecticut." I've also heard a rumor of Jim Carrey remaking "Sullivan's Travels." Give me a break. One person asked, 'Whati s the difference between what Milli Vinilli did and actors who were lipsynched in the movies?" Well, in some ways it is the same, but in one big way it is different. The actors in films who were lipsyhnced by others were doing at least half of the job on screen: they were doing their own acting. I mean, let's face, how would you feel is you went to see "Producers" on Broadway and found out Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick were being lypsynched by someone backstage, a la "Singing In the Rain?:" How much is a Broadway ticket now. Spending $1,000 on a concert and the person spends more time talking about politics and singing? Milli Vinnilli were supposed to be singers. They signed a record deal. They should not have agreed to what agent wanted. However, nowadays, it's all about veneer over substance. True, most of the members of "Partridge Family" didn't sing, but Shirley Jones and David Cassidy did. "The Archies" were made up of singer Andy Kim, but he sang. While, I totally disagree with having nonsingers doing musical roles, a lot of times real-life singers were dubbed. Examples include Angela Lansbury (4 Tony awards), Alexis Smith (1 Tony), and of all people, Ann Blyth. She played Helen Morgan in a film. Gogi Grant dubbed her, which is odd, since Blyth sounded more like Morgan than Grant did. Oh, the amazement of what Hollywood does. Then there is the "King and I" and choice of Deborah Kerr. Now, I was named for Kerr. She is one of my faovrite actresses, and if it had been strictly dramatic, she would have been good. By the time film was made, Irene Dunne was too old, and Gertrude Lawrence was dead. Rogers and Hammerstein had a chance to have Maureen O'Hara as Anna (what great casting that would have been), but Oscar didn't want a woman who made "pirate movies" to play Anna. I guess Oscar never saw "How Green Was My Valley" or "Quiet Man." When a Broadway revival came along, O'Hara was offered the part, but turned down Rogers, said if she was not good enough originally, she was not good enough now. I blame the producers and record label more than Milli Vinnilli for what happened, although the two men could have not agreed to go along with it. It's just another attempt to try to make excuses for the errors of judgment and deceit that went on so many years ago. It's not a new story, either. There is going to be a film on that man who wrote the phony Howard Huges biography, Clifford Irving, who went to jail because of it. Considering the excuses made for "Million Little Pieces," if it happened today, people would come up with all sorts of garbage of why it happened. Someone hit it right on the head when they said the music industry is all about looks and a style, rather than any sort of musical talent. I agree 100%. As he pointed out, Paula Abdul's voice isn't the greatest (kind of whiny). And, what has Simon Cowel every done. Jennifer Hudson was better off not winning the competition, where everyone is expected to be size zero (both figure wise and mental wise). There seems to be this desire to see people made fun of, laugh at people, and say nasty things to them. Larry, I hate to say it, but I think you're right about the tragic Anna Nicole Smith. Is a TV movie of the week, if nothing else, on it's way. Anything for exploitation. What kills me is the audition tapes of "American Idol," which I've seen clips of. I mean, half of these people make my dad sound like Enrico Caruso. He sings more on key to our dog than these people do. Don't they realize they can't sing and are tone death. Do they enjoy being made fun of, or do they just want their five minutes of fame, no matter what. As far as I'm concerned, it's all exploitation. And, how many of these winners have absolutely made it. The fact that you can vote more than once tells it all. Well, "Dancing With Stars" is going to air opposite Idol; so, we get more amusement for those "reality TV show" people. Heather Mills is one of the celebrities. Actually, if I had to choose betwene the two, I would pick "Stars." I just don't watch network TV. Even Anna Nicole Smith had a reality (unreality, really show). How's the weather up in Canada, Larry. We've had a lot of snow in Chicago. Baseball season is just around the corner, and the Cubs have come up with another curse. This time it's the George M. Cohan-Murphy curse. They got to have some reason for not winning championship in (going on) 99 years. Take care. Deborah`
  10. Hi, everyone: Update on "One Man's Journey." It will air twice on April 4 in primetime on TCM. The film stars Lionel Barrymore as a small-town country doctor, Joel McCrea is his son, and Frances Dee is Joel's love interest. Dorothy Jordan plays Barrymore's ward and the other female lead RKO Studios cast Joel and Frances in this film to capitalize on their burgeoning romance at the time. Interestingly enough, Joel introduced Dorothy Jordan (his costar in "Lost Squadron") to her future husband, producer-director-actor Merriam C. Cooper. The three actors spent Fourth of July weekend in 1933 as guest's at Cooper's house (found in old newspaper column). The remake with Edward Ellis will also be shown in April. Now, I like Ellis, but no one can compare to Lionel Barrymore. Ellis actually remade another Barrymore role. He did the role of father in "Sweepings" as "Three Sons" in late 1930's. Anyway, enjoy the film. Except for showing at Film Forum in March 2004 in New York, the film hasn't been seen in 40 years. Take care. Deborah
  11. Hi, everyone: I got a Google email recently talking about six lost RKO films purchased by TCM, to be restored and shown in 2007. One of them stars Lionel Barrymore as a small-town country doctor. It is called "One Man's Journey." The film also costars Joel McCrea as Barrymore's son, Dorothy Jordan as Barrymore's ward, and Frances Dee as Joel McCrea's love interest. This is one film I have been dying to see for years, but had given up ever seeing it. Then in 2004, a couple of days before Frances Dee passed, it was shown at a New York City Film festival, which I found rather ironic. So, I thought, "Maybe the film will show up, and now it has." From what I read, at the time the film came out, it did fairly well at the book office. Barrymore seems to be playing one of the gentler characters of his career. RKO purchased five other films, including the 1938 remake of this film. So, it is something to look forward to in 2007. I found it odd when Frances Dee passed, that they only mentioned three films she and Joel did together. Then it occurred to me that perhaps they thought the other film was lost or didn't exist anymore. Well, now it does. Take care. Deborah
  12. Hi, Pintorini: I second your admiration for Joel McCrea. While his career lasted a good 35 years, and he is best known for westerns today, somehow I like his 1930's stuff the best, especially some of the precode stuff. I just love the "Most Dangerous Game." Also, seeing Joel running around in as little as the law allowed in "Bird of Paradise" is also great fun, even though the plot is rather silly. And, there is that famous scene with Joel and Dolores Del Rio swimming under water together. Dolores had a stunt double (who, yes, did have a bathing suit on), but Joel did his own underwater stunts, including the one with the tortoise. At first, they tried to use a mechanical turtle; however, it kept sinking. So, Joel wound up swimming under water holding onto a real turtle, and as director King Vidor said, "lived to tell about it." I like the original much better than the Technicolor remake. Speaking of Joel's 1930's films, one of the long lost ones is coming to TCM in 2007. It seems TCM purchased six RKO films that had been sold out of the RKO library. Four of them are the original films and their remakes, which will probably be shown back to back. One of these films and remakes is "One Man's Journey" and "Man to Remember," the latter of which stars Edward Ellis. Anyway, the original film starred Lionel Barrymore as a small-town doctor who never gets the credit he deserves. Joel McCrea costars as his son. And, Joel's future wife, Frances Dee, plays his love interest in the film. RKO basically put Joel and Frances into this film to capitalize on their real-life romance, which it did. It also gave Lionel Barrymore one of his better roles, where you get to see a gentler side of Barrymore. Supposedly, the film will show in 2007 sometime. Now, if they would only restore "Wells Fargo" to original two-hour length. I also like "Becky Sharp" a lot, but I agree that it does come off as a little campy at times, but that might be partly due to the flavor of the novel, which was a satire on mores of the day. I am a big fan of Hopkins, especially in her precode days. This film also has historical significance as the first three-strip Technicolor film. I would just love to see story of "Temple Drake." Getting back to Joel McCrea, when you look at his body of work, his career lasted a lot longer than some of his contemporaries, although he was never a superstar, like Gable or Grant. However, that was partly because that was how he wanted it. I can hardly wait until his biography comes out. Take care. Deborah
  13. Hi, everyone: It's been ahwile since I've posted. As I said in another thread, I have had trouble with my computer. I recently got to see another one of Frances Dee's early films, one in which she had a very prominent role, although only about fourth or fifth billing. The film is called "This Reckless Age." It is the sound picture of a silent and stage film called "Goose Hangs High." Frances plays the role Constance Bennett played in the silent version. Of course, Constance dated Frances' husband, Joel McCrea, before Joel and Frances met. The story is about a couple of rich kids who take their parents forgranted. Frances is kind of a spoiled, selfish, rich girl who is not unkind, but rather careless. She is like a lot of youth, doing foolish things and maybe not appreciating her parents. However, when her father (played by Richard Bennett) gets in trouble, Frances helps comes to the rescue. Buddy Rogers plays her brother, who wants to quit school and go to college. Anyway, there are a lot of ups and downs before the end of the film. What's interesting, other than Frances' performance, is Richard Bennett, who is playing a character as far removed from the real Richard Bennett as possible. The father in this film is more like a Joel McCrea-type, very soft-spoken and down-to-earth-not likely to lose one's temper. Charles Ruggles plays a friend of the family, with the improbable name of Goliath Whitney. What makes me laugh is oen of the McCrea's sons was named David. This is an enjoyable little film. If you get a chance go see it. Take care. Deborah
  14. Hi, everyone: I noticed this thread awhile back and wanted to respond, but have been having trouble with my computer. It's a shame that Constance Bennett isn't more well known today, but that is part of the purpose of these boards, to introduce Classic-Hollywood stars to new audiences. Thanks for that wonderful story on Constance, Larry. I hope your surgery went well. Welcome back. It shows the other side of Constance, the kindhearted, sweet side. Her children seem to have had a high regard for her; so, she couldn't have been that bad. Part of the problem, too, is the stupid entertainment reporters nowadays. Awhile back, a so-called journalist wrote an article on Constance calling her the original Paris Hilton. Well, first of all, since Constance was born 80+ years before Paris, Paris isn't the original anything as far as this goes. Paris is not even the original shallow nitwit. Anyway, this woman referred to Connie and Joan as if they were wealthy heiresses, who worked because they were bored. Now, I did not read the Bennetts book. I did kind of read a couple of chapters on the father, who was quite a character. One could say he was certainly a "Peck's Bad Boy" growing up. But, from what I recall, whatever fortune Richard Bennett had he lost, and toward the end of his life, his two daughters were taking care of him (both Joan and Constance). Barbara was already severely messed up at the time; so, I doubt she was involved. That was the other thing: no mention of the middle sister, as if Barbara didn't exist. As Feaito said, she had all those men fall in love with her; so, she couldn't have been a total jerk. Her son said she thought with producers and directors because she wanted her fans to get their money's worth. Joan always said that Constance was always suing someone, and she wondered how she was able to make so many pictureres. Constance was also an ace poker player, and beat a lot of the moguls in all-night poker games, according to Peter Plant. The thing I never understood is why Constance never gave her son his birth certificate. He figures he was her biological son with Plant. Judging by some home movies I saw on Hedda Hopper's Hollywood, he resembles his mother quite a lot; so, I'm pretty sure he is right about that. Constance, I guess, inherited her game playing from her father. The funny thing is, by lying about her age, I guess she forgot that her father was big matinee idol, and her birth would have been plastered across headlines. Elizabeth Montgomery was another one who shaved years off her birthdate, even though her birthday (in 1933) also made headlines. I know Joel McCrea always spoke fondly of Connie. He said she was very nice to him. And, he never used their relationship (whatever it was) to get ahead. He never talked about it all, in fact, until he discussed it with John Kobal. Take care, everyone. Deborah
  15. Hi, Michellej: No, you didn't miss the two-minute tribute to Virginia Mayo. TCM didn't do the individual one for Virginia, like they did for Frances Dee. Robert Osborne actually knew Ms. Mayo. So, one morning, shortly after her passing, they changed their programming for a bunch of their films, something they didn't do with Frances. Part of that probably had to do with the fact that Frances did a lot of her screen work at Paramount. For some reason, a lot of the Paramount films are in movie limbo from Universal. Go figure. I'm figuring Mr. Osborne must have known Frances Dee and her husband, Joel McCrea, as well, since he has been reporting the Hollywood scene for years. Bob Osborne was one of the few people who knew Frances' correct birth year (1909), when most outlets (including TCM) didn't; so, I'm guessing he at least met them one time. I believe Mayo and her husband lived near the McCreas; so, he might have even met them through Virginia. Who knows? All I know is that they don't make them like that anymore, and that the townspeople thought highly of all of them. Ms. Mayo left a lot of her Hollywood memorabilia to the area library. The McCreas donated their ranch to be used as a public park. Incidentally, in case you're interested, the image file the 1910 Census was on was at Yahoo. I typed in Yahoo.com, clicked on images. Then I typed in either Frances Dee or Francis Dee, and the Census image came right up. However, it does not work out all of the time; so, I'll try and see if I can find a more direct link, if you would like to see it. Sometimes it works; other times it doesn't. The Census lists Frank M. Dee Jr, wife Henrietta, and two daughters: Margaret P. (2) and Francis M. (4/12 months). There is also some housekeeper living with the family, listed underneath their two young daughters. I would try and do this on your home computer, not at a library, since they seem to have less hits at library. As for missing Frances' tribute, it wasn't your fault. You really had to be looking for it, like I was, to be able to find it. I just had some free time around then. I don't know if you can get a copy through TCM or not. You would have to check with them. Take care. Deborah
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