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Chillyfillyinalaska

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  1. 1. The constraints of the silent medium dictate the differing approaches to a body of a fair haired (Hitchcock and those blondes!) woman being found on the Thames embankment. "Lodger's" exposition relies heavily on pantomime aided by a very small bit of dialogue and a lot of written newspaper material to let the audience know that London has a serial killer called "The Avenger" on the loose who has already killed 7 blondes. Hitchcock creates a sense of urgency in his silent opening by using the newspaper's need to get its story out quickly to the eager public to read. "Frenzy " opens with all
  2. 1. Marnie is ladylike in her introduction into the film. She is wearing a well cut tweed suit. From behind her walk is feminine and dainty, her hair a glossy brunette. Once she is in the room (after encountering Hitchcock coming out of another room), the audience understands that she has multiple identities. Marnie is switching suitcases, placing clothes and items she has used in one case, and packing new, unused things in a different case. She changes her identity by replacing one SS card with another from several fraudulent cards she has hidden behind a purse mirror. She empties out cash fro
  3. 1 and 2. The graphics featuring lines traveling at varying speeds, directions and lengths are as chaotic as one could get and still convey the necessary credit information. The score punctuates the out of control and random feeling of the graphics by its own random and varying tempo. One of the main themes of psycho is escape. The music and lines presage Marion's flight from Phoenix, and her abrupt, random stop at the Bates Motel. In the film, Marion and Norman talk about escaping to a private island. Marion wants to escape, and thinks Norman does too, because of his poor situation with his s
  4. If I had never seen "Vertigo," I would think the film is about a period between two deaths. The obvious reason for this is that the opening sequence specifies that the story is based on a French story called "D'Entre des Morts." (Between the Deaths). I would think that the tale was about two deaths because the spiraling graphics always manifest in two rings linked to each other. The most powerful image is of the constant spiraling, which begins as an eye and results in two linked rings. As stated before, this image is a clue to the meaning of the French story title upon which the film is
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