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rross856

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Everything posted by rross856

  1. Even though this film is a comedy, I do see a certain "Hitchcock" touch to the opening of Mr. and Mrs. Smith. Like Shadow of a Doubt, we learn about important parts of the plot and characters right from the beginning. In this clip, we see the couple are having some sort of stand off with one another: food trays have piled up, the husband is unshavened and the staff has not be able to get anything done. The set does a good job in making this clear. And the fact that we know that this is not their first standoff, that their record is 8 days, sets up the move from the beginning. I would say
  2. From the opening scene, we see that Charlie is being followed, by whom, we aren't sure. We also learn that he is worried about being followed. He plays cool and calm when the land lady tells him of the men outside but once he is alone, he reacts angrily to their presence. And we also see that he is a bit brazen - rather than remain holed up in his room, he walks directly toward and then past the men. His cavalier attitude is seen throughout the rest of the film. This is extremely similar to the opening scene of The Killers, in direction and foreshadowing. In that opening scene the young
  3. There are differences between this opening and the ones we have seen from Hitchcock's British films but there is one noticeable similarities: the opening sequence is all about movement and pacing for the movie. The opening sequence introduces the home, Manderley, but also the main characters first meet as Joan Fontaine's character is walking along the cliff. What is different about this opening is that the movement is one continuous shot, not a montage of edits like his earlier silent works. The movement in the opening sequence marks it, to me, as a Hitchcock film, especially seeing it in t
  4. The music used in the opening scene of The Lady Vanishes sets up a playful, convivial tone of the movie. This is also aided by the two men who come into the inn, who add to the commotion of the manager on the phone. Once the young woman and her two friends enter the scene and begin joking with the manager, the tone has been firmly established as light and humorous. The characters of Caldicott and Charters are interesting because all that we know of the two from the beginning of the scene is that they are passengers who missed their last train and are now stuck at the inn. We also learn why
  5. The music used in the opening scene of The Lady Vanishes sets up a playful, convivial tone of the movie. This is also aided by the two men who come into the inn, who add to the commotion of the manager on the phone. Once the young woman and her two friends enter the scene and begin joking with the manager, the tone has been firmly established as light and humorous. The characters of Caldicott and Charters are interesting because all that we know of the two from the beginning of the scene is that they are passengers who missed their last train and are now stuck at the inn. We also learn why
  6. The opening of 39 Steps fits in well with the openings that we have seen so far, in that, the scene all involve movement of some kind. In the opening we touched on last week, most of the movies begin with montages that outline a story of something that has happened that sets up the plot going forward. In 39 Steps, the opening is still filled with movement and action but it only sets up the immediate story line, not a larger plot for the entire film. I disagree with Rothman's statement that Hannay is established as a more innocent character but not because I don't think that this was Hitchco
  7. I would say that characters and plot will be of equal importance. I have not seen this version of the film - though I have seen the version with Doris Day and James Stewart - and I believe that both the storyline and the characters drive the movie forward. What is learned about Peter Lorre's character is very little in the opening scene. He seems to be a polite, easy tempered person but he is the suppose to be the villain. I'm not saying that those two things are mutually exclusive but it does mean that he will be a complex character in the film. The opening of The Man Who Knew Too Much r
  8. From just watching the scene, you can tell that Alice is the main character, as the camera follows her in the shop. She is obviously in some sort of turmoil. When the lady customer continues talking of the murder, then you actually see how Alice is affected. As Alice sits at the table, the woman's conversation drowns out and all she able to hear is the word "knife," showing how Alice has become able to think of nothing other than the knife. The visual and audio tracks during the scene at the table are setup to compliment one another. Alice is, for a time, the only character that we see thoug
  9. The effect of watching the POV dolly/tracking shots keeps the audience focused on one or certain characters within the scene. In this case, the shot that was most impactful for me was focused on the young woman. In this film, Hitchcock uses the shot to create drama, which is especially meaning when knowing the backstory - that one of the young men is being accused of being the father of her unborn child. It was very suspenseful because no one, who watches the movie for the first time, knew who she was going to accuse. With the camera focusing on one or several characters for a prolonged period
  10. To display the energy of the scene, nearly every scene that was included in the sequence was full of movement. The women dancing, the musicians playing their instruments, and the friends all clapping and enjoying the party add to the feeling and impact of the scene. No one is simply just sitting, other than the wife and the man she's flirting with. What I notice regarding the subjectivity of the scene is the prolonged close ups on the wife and the boxer. When we first see her, she is just a woman enjoying the party with a man, but then in the close up of her face, we see that there is somet
  11. There wasn't must similarity between the openings of The Lodger and The Pleasure Garden that I could spot. In the first clip, there is no hint as to what the major conflict will be for the film, all that we know is that the young woman, who looks rather desperate, has had her letter of introduction stolen. The real value of that is not known. In the second clip, from today's film, we know right away what the conflict will be because it is set up from the first frame. After learning that Hitchcock was greatly influenced by German expressionism and fatalism, you can see that in today's clip.
  12. If there was one thing that I saw as the "Hitchcock touch" in this scene, it would be humor when the young lady takes off her hair piece. In the middle of a serious scene, this bit of lightness breaks the drama. I have only seen his American work but this is something that I have come to distinguish about Hitchcock's work, whether in his earlier work like Saboteur or more commonly known pieces like Rear Window. He works to insert bits of humor that are never forced but always fit into the scene. Because I have not seen all of Hitchcock's films, I cannot say whether Strauss, Yacowar and Spoto a
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