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Ppalmer

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  1. Another film I thought of is The Fugitive, based on the 1960's television show, we have an innocent man convicted, who is escapes from custody, chased all over and yet he's seeking the one-armed man who is the McGuffin.
  2. Like others, I also thought of Charade with Cary Grant & Audrey Hepburn. Not only do we have an innocent accused, but there is humor & sex like Hitchcock would inject (Grant showering fully clothed.) Another film I thought of is The Fugitive, based on the 1960's television show, we have an innocent man convicted, who is escapes from custody, chased all over and yet he's seeking the one-armed man who is the McGuffin. I heard an interview many years ago with Steven Spielberg about Jaws, he became very frustrated that the mechanical shark would not work the way he wanted. He fina
  3. I heard an interview many years ago with Steven Spielberg about Jaws, he became very frustrated that the mechanical shark would not work the way he wanted. He finally thought back to how Hitchcock never really revealed the source of suspense in his movies, so instead of showing the shark he let the music drive the mood and add to the tension until at the very end you hear the one line, "I think we need a bigger boat." http://mentalfloss.com/article/31105/how-steven-spielbergs-malfunctioning-sharks-transformed-movie-business There is also the great pairing of John Williams score to th
  4. Like others, I also thought of Charade with Cary Grant & Audrey Hepburn. Not only do we have an innocent accused, but there is humor & sex like Hitchcock would inject (Grant showering fully clothed.) Another film I thought of is The Fugitive, based on the 1960's television show, we have an innocent man convicted, who is escapes from custody, chased all over and yet he's seeking the one-armed man who is the McGuffin. I heard an interview many years ago with Steven Spielberg about Jaws, he became very frustrated that the mechanical shark would not work the way he wanted. He fina
  5. Like others, I also thought of Charade with Cary Grant & Audrey Hepburn. Not only do we have an innocent accused, but there is humor & sex like Hitchcock would inject (Grant showering fully clothed.) This film also includes wonderful locations.
  6. 1. How does the opening of Frenzy differ from the opening of The Lodger? Feel free to rewatch the clip from The Lodger (Daily Dose #2) for comparison. The Lodger starts immediately with a woman screaming after finding a body near the Thames, in Frenzy he takes his time & is even a part of the crowd when the man yells "look!" 2. What are some of the common Hitchcock touches that you see in this opening scene? Be specific. Again we see a crowd gathered around invoking the sense of voyeurism. 3. Using Frenzy as an example, what thoughts do you have about the various purposes
  7. Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects. Marnie is a chameleon and we meet her as she's changing her colors blithely throwing away the old and carefully packing up the new. How does Hitchcock use Bernard Herrmann's score in this scene? At first the music is used to pass the time as it builds towards a crescendo of sound and rising pitch as Marnie raises her head from the sink becoming her new character. Did you see any variat
  8. In what ways does this opening scene seem more appropriate to a romantic comedy than a “horror of the apocalypse” film? What do we learn about Melanie (Tippi Hedren) and Mitch (Rod Taylor) in this scene? This truly is more like a romantic comedy, Melanie's ignorance of birds becomes comical as she tries to show Mitch around the shop. We also learn that Melanie is impatient but Mitch's patience with her is striking. That's when we learn he's enjoying the banter. How does Hitchcock use sound design in this opening sequence? For example, how are the sounds of birds used to create a partic
  9. Psycho opens with title design by Saul Bass and music by Bernard Herrmann. This is their third collaboration for Hitchcock, including Vertigoand North by Northwest. How does the graphic design and the score introduce the main themes of this film? The way the lines cross and break the names is indicative of how Norman Bates own mind is broken. The musical themes contrast each other the high agitated strings and there's staccato pattern against the very nice legato lower strings indicate that there is something more to come. As the titles end, we have three shots of Phoenix, Arizona, and
  10. Even at the level of the dialogue, this film is playing with the idea that two Hollywood stars are flirting with each other (e.g. the line, "I look vaguely familiar.") How does our pre-existing knowledge of these stars function to create meaning in this scene. The flirting is emphasized by the role reversal and that she's picking him up. By this time, we know that Cary Grant is a ladies man and from the interview I love Eva Marie Saint's description of the sexy spy lady. There is minimal action in this scene, so any deviation from the overall pattern of focusing on the faces of the tw
  11. Describe what you think this film will be about simply from the sounds and images in these opening credits. Even if you have seen the film, try to focus on these sounds and images themselves and “the story” (or if not "the story," the mood and atmosphere they are establishing) that this sequence is communicating to the audience. I have seen Vertigo and it is my favorite of Hitchcock's films, but I think the title sequence elicits the dizziness of vertigo (something I have experienced). I also think that paired with the images the musical pattern that develops with the repetitive scale pla
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