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melissasimock

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About melissasimock

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  1. Hmmmm. I <3 Grantchester. I hadn't thought about Hitchcock when I watched this show. But I will definitely keep it in mind for my second viewing!
  2. My favourite homage to Hitchcock, is episode #16 "Mr. Yin Presents" (season finale) of PSYCH, season 4. Directed by James Roday. It is hands down, the best episode of the entire 8 seasons of the show. Here are a few snippets to wet your appetite: Psych Catch Up - James Roday "Mr. Yin Presents" Intro SEASON FINALE of Psych on USA Network - "Mr. Yin Presents" 3/10 Promo Scene from the SEASON FINALE of Psych on USA Network - "Mr. Yin Presents" 3/10 Scene #2 from SEASON FINALE of Psych on USA Network - "Mr. Yin Presents" 3/10 Scene #3 from the SEASON FINALE of Psy
  3. 1. How does the opening of Frenzy differ from the opening of The Lodger? Feel free to rewatch the clip from The Lodger (Daily Dose #2) for comparison. The Lodger starts with a face close up, and then goes to the dead body. Frenzy starts with a far away view of the city, slowly getting closer tot he people, and eventually gets to the dead body. The Lodger starts with the killing, where Frenzy lets you get comfortable first. We don't immediately know what we're in for. 2. What are some of the common Hitchcock touches that you see in this opening scene? Be specific. We're in a loca
  4. Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects. We know she uses multiple identities, by the number of SS cards she has. We know she changes her appearance, we can assume with her identity, as she goes for quick changes. (Fyi, that black dye would never rinse out like that, leaving bright blonde.) She has expensive taste. We know she's leaving one life behind. She tosses her old clothes into the suitcase she leaves at the station, and she
  5. In what ways does this opening scene seem more appropriate to a romantic comedy than a “horror of the apocalypse” film? What do we learn about Melanie (Tippi Hedren) and Mitch (Rod Taylor) in this scene? We see the symbolism of 'couples', and reference to love birds. We witness the flirtation between to people who just met, and are attracted to one another. Other than not being able to escape the bird sounds, the scene has a lighter feel to it. Melanie is looking for a companion. Mitch has a sister who is much younger than he is, and he cares for her. Mitch is also knowledgable of b
  6. Psycho opens with title design by Saul Bass and music by Bernard Herrmann. This is their third collaboration for Hitchcock, including Vertigo and North by Northwest. How does the graphic design and the score introduce the main themes of this film? You know there is going to be some intensity in this film. You will be on the edge of your seat. There will be tense and anxious moments. There is brokenness to these characters. As the titles end, we have three shots of Phoenix, Arizona, and a very specific day, date, and time: “FRIDAY, DECEMBER THE ELEVENTH” and “TWO FORTY-THREE P.M.”
  7. Even at the level of the dialogue, this film is playing with the idea that two Hollywood stars are flirting with each other (e.g. the line, "I look vaguely familiar.") How does our pre-existing knowledge of these stars function to create meaning in this scene. They are both beautiful, talented, Hollywood stars. Cary has a reputation for being sexy, charming, suave. From Eva's TCM interview, she admits to being attracted to Cary. In the scene Eva's character is the one who goes after Cary. Both being big Hollywood stars, they have similar clout. In real world Hollywood it wouldn't be
  8. Describe what you think this film will be about simply from the sounds and images in these opening credits. Even if you have seen the film, try to focus on these sounds and images themselves and “the story” (or if not "the story," the mood and atmosphere they are establishing) that this sequence is communicating to the audience. From this sequence, it appears to be about a woman, and the inner workings of her mind. Turmoil. Things may not be as they appear to be. There is a definite sense of unease. This scene also gives me the feeling that time is fluid here. In your own est
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