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Mrs. Archie Leach

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About Mrs. Archie Leach

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  1. How does the opening of Frenzy differ from the opening of The Lodger? Feel free to rewatch the clip from The Lodger (Daily Dose #2) for comparison. In the Lodger, the very first image is of the woman screaming and being strangled. We get to the action immediately there and in this scene from Frenzy, it takes us a few minutes to get to it. Hitchcock takes more time to set the scene here. In the Lodger, the typewriter serves as a way to convey the information that there is a serial killer on the loose. This opening scene clip doesn't give us any information about the woman in the river. Wha
  2. Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects. We learn that she has recently spent a lot of money on a shopping spree. As she is filling the second suitcase with a new wardrobe, she is carelessly tossing other items into the first suitcase. When she sorts through the different social security cards hidden in her compact mirror, we understand that this wardrobe she is assembling is for a new identity and she intends to discard the old one. She ha
  3. In what ways does this opening scene seem more appropriate to a romantic comedy than a “horror of the apocalypse” film? What do we learn about Melanie (Tippi Hedren) and Mitch (Rod Taylor) in this scene? It's a typical "meet cute" from a romantic comedy. The scene is light and playful. There is nothing intimidating about the location. Melanie plays the part of the salesgirl to talk to Mitch and the exchange is flirty and fun. He catches on quickly to the fact that she is pretending and his questions meant to expose her allow for some comedy as she makes up her answers. I think they have in
  4. This is the only film of the three mentioned that was shot in black and white and the result is a stark, sharp sequence. The music is brilliant and very deliberately jarring. The way the lines sweep from side to side reminds me of a window curtain being pulled open and closed. It reminds me of the figure in the window of the house. Also, the way the lines appear to create names ... at first you get part of the word but you can't necessarily decipher what the names are until the whole word is assembled. To me, that was reminiscent of the storytelling technique. We will get parts of the story th
  5. Even at the level of the dialogue, this film is playing with the idea that two Hollywood stars are flirting with each other (e.g. the line, "I look vaguely familiar.") How does our pre-existing knowledge of these stars function to create meaning in this scene. There is minimal action in this scene, so any deviation from the overall pattern of focusing on the faces of the two leads will have increased significance. In that sense, discuss how Hitchcock uses the R.O.T. matchbook as an important piece of acting business (or as a prop) in this scene. How is Hitchcock using sound design in this sc
  6. Even at the level of the dialogue, this film is playing with the idea that two Hollywood stars are flirting with each other (e.g. the line, "I look vaguely familiar.") How does our pre-existing knowledge of these stars function to create meaning in this scene. There is minimal action in this scene, so any deviation from the overall pattern of focusing on the faces of the two leads will have increased significance. In that sense, discuss how Hitchcock uses the R.O.T. matchbook as an important piece of acting business (or as a prop) in this scene. How is Hitchcock using sound design in this sc
  7. Describe what you think this film will be about simply from the sounds and images in these opening credits. Even if you have seen the film, try to focus on these sounds and images themselves and “the story” (or if not "the story," the mood and atmosphere they are establishing) that this sequence is communicating to the audience. In your own estimation, what is the single most powerful image in this title sequence? Defend your answer. How do Saul Bass’ images and Bernard Herrmann’s score work together? How different would this sequence be with a different musical score? The extreme closeup
  8. How would you describe the opening camera shot of this film? What is Hitchcock seeking to establish in this single shot that opens the film? Whose vantage point is being expressed in this shot, given that Jeff has his back to the window? I think Hitchcock is immediately bringing the audience into the action. We move through the open windows. We survey the courtyard the way we might if we were just waking up, stretching and looking outside. In addition to wanting to show off his elaborate set, Hitchcock wastes no time in establishing the players. We're going to be allowed to observe these l
  9. In how many ways does Hitchcock play with or visually manifest the metaphor of “criss cross” or “criss-crossing” in this introductory sequence. [For those who haven’t seen the film yet, the idea of “criss cross” is central idea in this film, a theme Hitch sets up from the opening frames of this film] Be specific. The railroad tracks are the most obvious metaphor. The tracks are seen ahead, criss-crossing one another. I think it's interesting that the train starts off heading straight on the tracks and then veers to the right, off the original path. This is symbolic I think of Guy veering off h
  10. The Hitchcock "touches" I notice are the creative camera angles ... the famous upside-down POV shot of Cary Grant walking towards her as she lays on the bed ... subtle humor as when she finds her hair piece/bun. She is slightly comical in her hangover state which makes her more likable and sympathetic. I've always remembered the gown she wears in this scene ... the stripes might imply she is a prisoner; trapped in her party-girl life, daughter of a traitor, etc. Cary Grant is low-lit in the beginning of the scene. His face is slightly obscured. He is framed nicely in the doorway but on an
  11. The primary Hitchcock "touch" I notice is the use of humor in the scene but I wonder how much of that is Hitchcock and how much is the genre. We learn that the couple is wealthy and has been in the room for a while. The lighting is bright in the Smith home, more shadowy in the scenes depicting the law office. We can tell by the bystanders in the office and the staff at the home that the Smiths are a couple whose antics capture the interest of others. It piques the audience's interest in turn, The one camera shot that stood out to me was the closeup of Lombard's partial face under the covers. W
  12. The opening scene offers us some insights into Uncle Charlie. He's lying on a bed, fully-clothed with a cigar. He rents a room in a city which implies he's not doing great financially but he has a large amount of cash haphazardly placed on the nightstand and the floor. He seems alone in the world, with just his landlady looking out for him. He looks out the window and says "You've nothing on me." which kind of implies there is something to be had. Right off the bat it seems like Uncle Charlie is in some kind of trouble and unlike some of the "wrong man" characters who innocently find themselve
  13. 1. This opening is different from the other opening scenes we have seen in the Daily Doses from the British silent and/or sound period in a few ways. It's much more introspective. Instead of meeting multiple characters right off the bat, we are privy to the subconscious of the heroine. It's not a public place, there is not the humorous touch. This feels like a more serious story by the way the narrator recounts her dream and then that is backed up when she meets de Winter and for a moment she imagines he was about to commit suicide. 2. The Hitchcock touches I notice in the scene are the POV
  14. 1. The hotel is quaint and picturesque. The hotel manager is charming and funny in his flustered way. The travelers are relaxed and calm while they're waiting. The music is upbeat and sets a light tone. When the older lady exits and the two men come in speaking loudly, combined with the cuckoo clock chiming ... the scene becomes more lively. It's fun to see the reactions of the different characters. 2. Caldicott and Charters definitely add humor. I liked the line "Why the Deuce didn't he say so in the first place?" after the hotel manager finally makes the announcement in English. Typical tr
  15. 1. I think this opening scene, ironically about a question-and-answer session, raises a ton of questions. We know who the male lead is because we entered the theater with him. Aside from that, we don't know who may play an important role. The feel is lighthearted like The Pleasure Garden, with touches of humor. It's also similar to The Man Who Knew Too Much in that it's a gathering of people for purposes of entertainment. The crowd as a mob (heckling, not violent) reminded me of The Lodger a bit. 2. I'm not sure I agree with Rothman that Hitchcock is introducing a more innocent character. I
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