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britbrain1

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About britbrain1

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  1. Wasn't there a movie by that title starring Danny Kaye?
  2. Not a classic movie, but Pay it Forward.
  3. I've only read Cagney by Cagney (come to think of it, I'm not sure if "by Cagney" is part of the title or not) and Memoirs of a Professional Cad by George Sanders. I read the latter while I was at Harvard Summer School; their library system has everything, and I'm not willing to pay for this very rare book. I absolutely love Memoirs. Very witty and literate. It's also a little guarded, but it does reveal some of Sanders's complexity and difficulty finding contentment. At one point, he says, "I invariably play myself," but at another point, he refers to his screen persona as a "mask." He sounded more serious when he wrote the latter. Cagney's autobio was funny and interesting. I haven't read it in a long time. I started to read Katherine Hepburn's book about making The African Queen, but I found it hard to follow her train of thought.
  4. My guilty pleasure: The Rocky Horror Picture Show. Also, there's this really awful old movie I sometimes see on TV, I forgot the name. Maybe I'll post this in the "Info, Please" forum. The plot is, they freeze this guy who was struck by lightning while playing golf, and decades later, when they have the technology, they thaw him out and bring him back to life. He has no idea how to live in this futuristic world, so a few guys take him in. People get babies from a machine and swallow pills instead of eating meals. Whenever the ex-dead guy sees something like this, he goes into a weird pose and says, "Bring back the good old days!" There are also a few musical numbers for some unfathomable reason. The singers use a lot of grace notes and roll their r's. All the dialogue is laughably bad. Anyone know what I'm talking about?
  5. Ah, love that movie. My dad has had it on VHS for a long time, but if it's just been released on DVD, I suppose it's on Amazon. My third grade teacher kept a lot of animals in the classroom. She bought a lovely fish and asked us what to name it. The class came up with many suggestions, but they eventually named the fish "Starbucks." Now, I had never heard of Starbucks coffee in my life. I was (a)surprised that my eight-year-old peers had seen The Rainmaker and (b)wondering why they put an "s" at the end of Burt Lancaster's name.
  6. *shudders* Sorry, but I hate Ethel Merman's voice no matter what! The actress who plays Jean in The Court Jester opposite Danny Kaye . . . I don't know, sometimes I like her voice, sometimes it bugs me.
  7. Anne Baxter and Robert Mitchum are good additions. Deborah, I completely agree with you about today's movies.
  8. Oops - I wanted to mention that some of the silver screen actors HATED the controlling studio system. Cagney complained about it in his autobiography.
  9. Interesting thread. I've always thought that today's movies should be better than the old ones because of how much time goes into them. Studios used to crank out movies like an assembly line. With the time and money that is lavished on films today, a greater percentage of them SHOULD be good or great - but they're not. There probably is less talent out there. The making of Casablanca was a mess, but everyone who touched it was brilliant. I never realized how glamourous old movies/stars were compared to now. It's so true. At first I wondered whether it's a good thing or a bad thing. I saw an interview in which an actress (it might have been Bette Davis) denounces the loss of glamour, saying that movies should be larger than life. But why shouldn't they be real and down-to-earth? I guess it's like iz and elinor said; it's a sign of the times. Neither good nor bad. I do think stars should be more discreet, and the public less interested, in their sordid love lives. All this wonderful technology has shifted the focus of some movies to their special effects. It's great to have awesome images in a movie, but they should not supercede the script and acting. See Lawrence of Arabia for a good balance. Finally, thanks to everyone who defended a few current stars and films. We don't want to over-generalize.
  10. Yay, I'm not the only one who doesn't love Citizen Kane. For me, it's kind of like the book Mrs. Dalloway - brilliant, but not FUN. I think Casablanca is wonderful, but I've seen it way too many times, so now I've memorized the script and I just don't enjoy it the way I used to :-( I think comedies are so subjective, everyone laughs at different things, that's why Dr. Strangelove (which I love, though I suspect I've been brainwashed) and Some Like It Hot (which I like, but don't love) come up here.
  11. Haven't you guys seen the movie Man of La Mancha? Awful! I love Oliver! except that Oliver himself can't sing. Ron Moody is so much fun though.
  12. (Why is it calling me a guest? I'm having the same login problem as Deborah and several others, ugh.) Anyway, Claude Rains is my absolute favorite. I'm glad someone else mentioned him. (Are you a member of the Claude Rains yahoo group?) After seeing A Tale of Two Cities a few days ago, though, I must admit that Ronald Colman ties with him. Here are my other favorites, in no particular order: Gregory Peck (not all great voices are English!) George Sanders Vincent Price Basil Rathbone Orson Welles For pure coolness (sorry, I'm a teen), I must add Peter Lorre, George C. Scott, and Al Pacino.
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