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akparty14

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Everything posted by akparty14

  1. Could you elaborate more on some of Hitchcock's ditched efforts such as Kaleidoscope, The Blind Man, and others? Which do you find most intriguing? Which do you think Hitch most regretted not making?
  2. Which 5 acting performances do you think were most effective in conveying the "touch" or recurring themes Hitchcock exercised? They do not have to receive top billing or be in a leading role. My top 5 would be: 1. Anthony Perkins (Psycho) 2. Teresa Wright (Shadow of a Doubt) 3. James Stewart (Rear Window) 4. Ingrid Bergman (Notorious) 5. Robert Walker (Strangers on a Train) Add a brief explanation to each if you like.
  3. My List: 1. Vertigo, it is after all "Hitchcock's Masterpiece" and I find myself more and more attached every time 2. Dial M for Murder, Ray Milland stands out as an often sympathetic villain we can root for 3. Rope, the dialogue between Brandon and Phillip is fascinating and also highlights ****-eroticism 4. Rear Window, Jimmy Stewart is unable to walk but still delivers one of his most memorable works 5. Suspicion, Joan Fontaine is easy to follow for the audience who also want to trust Cary Grant Perhaps I will gain a greater appreciation for Lifeboat and The Trouble with Harry i
  4. 1. Based on these opening scene, what do you anticipate is going to be more important in this film--the characters or the plot? (It is fine to make an informed guess about the 2nd question if you haven't seen the film yet) Although I have only seen the first half of The Man Who Knew Too Much, it is fairly evident from these early scenes that the story will be more about inner conflicts for the characters more than the overall plot. An example of this is the hesitation between Louis Bernard and Peter Lorre's character as they acknowledge each other in the crowd of people. This early interactio
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