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bhryun

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Posts posted by bhryun

  1. I have a pressbook from "The Red Shoes". I have been trying to research it and see what it would be worth. Does anyone have any ideas where I could find this information? If I put this on ebay do you think anyone would be interested?

    Thanks-

    Lisa

  2. I think you pinpointed why I like the TCM events such as 31 Days Of Oscars or Summer Under the Stars, yes some of those same ole TCM standards are shown but there also seems to be a far more variety of films. I wonder why so many of these films aren't seen as often as others are. Don't get me wrong I love TCM, its one of my favorite movie channels if not my most favorite. I just wish they would diverse their schedules more and give us more variety from their library.

  3. i get aggravated when i see a movie on TCM that i really like, only to find out they don't sell it on the website.

     

    how do you guys get a hold of some of these movies?

     

    i'm really trying to get several movies with Marian Marsh in them, but i'm having no luck.

     

    i've tried eBay which is so/so, but i'm just wondering if there is something else out there.

     

    thanks.

  4. markfp2:

     

    My very point. The studios are kicking themselves all over for having passed on the PASSION. Now it would just look like copycat or, more to the point, they are still deluding themselves that there is no audience for that type of film even though the public proved them wrong. Another thing, Mel Gibson is a religious man of faith and he was the perfect producer to make PASSION. Sadly, in the studios today, there are no comparable people of faith who could do a historically accurate and politically incorrect religious film. They would probably have cast Jennifer Lopez as Mary and Tom Cruise as Jesus Christ.

  5. i have to say that i am a fan of both of them. i don't know if a could chose one over the other.

     

    what is so surprising to me is that even though they obviously had different dancing styles (miller-tap charisse-ballet)they were often considered for the same roles. for example, Easter Parade. charisse had actually signed on to do it, but an injury prevented her from doing it. miller was the next one chosen. to imagine it any different than it was is just too hard.

     

    i think they each did what they did very well, and it would be tough to imagine their best roles played by the other, so i say that they're about equal.

  6. The Loew's Jersey Theatre is proud to open its new film season with the following comedy classics!

     

    For more information see http://www.loewsjersey.org , and to see our calendar page, see http://www.loewsjersey.org/calendar.php

     

     

     

    Saturday, October 8 at 3:30 PM

    Horse Feathers

    Starring Groucho, Harpo, Chico & Zeppo Marx. (1932 - 67 mins - B&W)

    (Not rated, but suitable for all ages.)

    Ostensibly a parody of the college films that were popular at the time, Horse Feathers finds Groucho Marx to be the latest in a long line of Presidents at the failing Huxley College. To save his school, Groucho decides to reverse its sorry record on the gridiron. To do this, he recruits Harpo and Chico, whom he mistakes for football stars, with hilariously awful results. But in truth, the plot doesn't matter that much, since Horse Feathers is really an attack on everything conventional - including plot. The movie revels in anarchy, and elevates the non-sequitur to an art form. Considered by fans to be one of the best of the Marx Brothers' movies.

     

    A classic Three Stooges short will be screened with Horse Feathers.

     

    Saturday, October 8 at 7:10PM

    Monty Python & the Holy Grail

    Starring Graham Chapman, Michael Palin, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, John Cleese. Directed by Terry Gilliam & Terry Jones. (1974 - 89 mins - Color) The British comedy troupe of Monty Python was among the most worthy of successors to the Marx Brothers' tradition of remorselessly and hilariously shattering the conventional. Monty Python & the Holy Grail sets up the familiar legend of King Arthur, complete with realistic armor and other period costumes and excellently selected exterior locations in Scotland - and riddles it with an unending barrage of non-sequiturs, slapstick, sight gags, anachronistic one-liners and undiluted madness. Monty Python & the Holy Grail will be screened at the Loew's in a restored print!

     

    Saturday, October 8 at 9:10 PM

    Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb

    Starring Peter Sellers, George C. Scott, Sterling Hayden, Slim Pickens, Keenan Wynn, James Earl Jones. Directed & Co-written by Stanley Kubrick.

    In 1964, at the height of the Cold War, Stanley Kubrick dared to make a movie about what could happen if the wrong person pushed the wrong button - and played the nightmare for laughs. A demented American general sends a B-52 loaded with atomic bombs to attack Russia - in retaliation for the fluoridation of water. The plane is piloted by an Air Force Major who is all too happy to be plunging into "Nuclear combat! Toe to toe with the Russkies!" Meanwhile, the US President, cloistered with his top advisors, including a super-hawk general and a mysterious civilian advisor with a German accent who is in the habit of saying "Mein Fuhrer" instead of "Mr. President," are trying to figure out how to get the Kremlin to over-look being bombed by a rogue American plane.

    Dr. Strangelove will be screened at the Loew's in a restored print.

     

    Admission for each screening is $6 for adults/$4 for seniors and children 12 and under

    Combo ticket for 2 screenings: $10 for adults/$6 for seniors & children

    Super-combo ticket for all 3 screenings: $15 for adults/$10 for seniors & children

    One FREE popcorn is included with the purchase of a super combo ticket

     

    The Landmark Loew's Jersey Theatre presents its classic films on a 50 foot wide screen using carbon arc illumination for the brightest, whitest light.

     

    The Loew's Jersey Theatre, located at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, is easily reached by car or mass transit from throughout the Metropolitan Area.

     

    Discount off-street parking is now available in the adjoining Square Ramp Garage. Patrons present a coupon as they exit the garage. Coupon provided at our box office.

     

    For directions or additional information, call (201) 798-6055 or visit www.loewsjersey.org

     

    Classic Film Weekends at the Landmark Loew's Jersey Theatre are presented by Friends of the Loew's, Inc., which operates the Loew's as a non-profit arts center.

     

  7. Back again-Googled "'J H Meyer'florida movie" and came up with this link:

    http://www.hillsborough.wateratlas.usf.edu/upload/documents/HILLSBOROUGH_COUNTY_Historic_Resources_Excerpts_Sun%20City.pdf

    If the link doesn't work the title that came up is "Sun City (Ross)Hillsborough County Historic Resources Survey Report" and it says that two short films featuring actresses Billie Moon and Bessie True were the only films made there. I checked IMDB and no listing at all for Billie Moon and three films for Bess True but none look like the ones you're seeking the titles for. No listing for a director named Harry Hiscox mentioned in the report either. If I come across anything else I'll post it here. Regards.

  8. This has piqued my curiosity as well. I didn't find anything except a few mentions in the St. Petersburg Times newspaper that you've probably already seen. I did see a poster for a 1930 Lupe Valez movie called "Hell Harbor" that was filmed in Tampa-perhaps that was based out of the Sun City location? Since it would've been a silent studio-originally at least-maybe posting the info you do have to the Google group "alt.movies.silent" would help. The people there are very knowledgable. Worth a try anyway. Good luck.

  9. I believe I saw this film on TCM. It was black and white, seemed like 1930s film probably.

     

    It involves a comedic racetrack swindle with two horses - twin horses. One horse is a swayback plow horse and the other is a sleek racehorse. The female star is a blonde bimbo character and is very funny.

     

    Does anyone know the name of this film?

     

    THANKS!!!!!

  10. What with the astounding success of Mel Gibson's THE PASSION OF THE CHRIST last year in the face of all the negative pre film propaganda, the generally anti-Christian bias of Hollywood, and the attempts to "play down" the film on many TV talk shows, why has Hollywood not gotten the message that middle America will turn out in droves to the theatres if there are decent, value oriented and, yes, religious themed feature films? More proof of that is the enormous success of the newly released THE EXORCISM OF EMILY ROSE. The film is strongly based on Christian principals, religious faith and combines this with court room drama. How many of you forum fans would like to see more of this type of film and less of the idiotic, juvenile sex-romp type films that are plagueing the theatres all over the country?

  11. I was wondering if someone could help me out and find the name of this movie I saw. I totally forgot to look at the title till it was over. It was a silent film, I don't know the name of the actors but the woman had blonde hair. Her name was Diane in the movie and it started with her trying to kill herself with a knife that belonged to some guy. She was on the streets and he found her then took her to his place. Then they fell in love and he went to war. He would go visit her at 11:00 every day but then he went blind. They were so in love that they communicated telepathically (sp?). He tried to go back to her and finally he made it home and she found out he was blind. It was just a short clip in "A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies" I remembered that name but I can't find the title or any info on this movie. It's not much info, but it's driving me nuts! Thanks!

  12. I was lucky to find a somewhat grainy, unscored VHS copy of the silent Stella Dallas a couple of years ago by posting a message at a film site somewhere. I know that very high quality copies of this film still exist because I have spoken to individuals at Kino and MOMA about the film I have inquired at Kino and Flicker Alley but there has been little interest in releasing it. It is also likely to be in the public domain. Most United Artists films from that time did not have their copyrights renewed in the 50's. The film is actually quite good, well directed by Henry King (Tol'able David, etc.), beautifully photographed, and paced well. And Belle Bennett is excellent. The rest of the cast is very good as well. It doesn't "feel" like a film of that era. The acting is very naturalistic. If there is any interest I can try to find the source for this video and leave a posting here.

     

    Roy

  13. Most of what needed to be said has already been said, I just wanted to add my agreement. Also sometimes there is nudity for no apparent reason. My thoughts go to The Devil's Advocate, which was real controversial in the first place, IMO. Loving Al Pacino, though, I did watch it and actually enjoyed most of it - but the nudity was unnecessary. At the end, Ms. Theron did not need to be fully nude and I do understand that it was a "holy fight" and had to do with her and Mr. Reeves making or not making love, but I don't think it needed to be done in the manner it was done. I totally agree with those of you who said that it is much sexier to be partially dressed than totally naked. And I don't think being a prude has anything to do with it - I think it's more common decency. Besides, the sexiest moments on film, to me, are moments like Gilda throwing her head back. Sexy is so much more than nudity - for whatever reason the nudity, it's not necessary.

     

    By the way, I'm not being overly polite here by saying Ms. Theron or Mr. Reeves, I just don't know how to spell either first name. LOL

     

    Katy

  14. I think TCM would be making a whole lot of people unhappy if they did show the Osmond movies as compared to one person if they don't show them. However, I agree with whoever said they are made for TV movies - there are other channels that cater to TV movies that might be easier to convince to show them than a classy channel like TCM. I can't see TCM rushing out to obtain them so you might have a long wait. If you already own these movies, why is it such a big issue whether TCM shows them or not?

  15. Haven't got time to look for the 'other' thread - hardly have any time on the computer since my son came back from Switzerland. Very glad to have him home, but sorry that I'm missing this wonderful group. :-(

     

    I love Sandy Dee movies - and mostly Bobby Darin. I know that they weren't great movies but I just love watching the two of them together - - - or apart - - - anyway. I've been watching a lot of 'Beyond the Sea' (I LOVE that movie!) in order to get my 'fix' hehe. I guess it's kinda like those of you who like Doris and Rock movies - I don't like either of them, but I sure understand why those of you who do, enjoy their movies even if they aren't 'great' by the usual standards. I'd watch Bobby Darin read the phone book. :-O

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