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johnnyweekes70

TCM_allow
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Everything posted by johnnyweekes70

  1. You're right, it doesn't look any different, except the credits weren't window-boxed as they were on the old print and though there's still a few minutes left, I'm sure the ending won't be clipped as it always seemed to be on the prior version. I don't get it. Having the bug appear every twenty minutes for thirty second renders the film a TCM print for pirators anyway, so what's really the use of having it on all the time, other than to annoy?? Years ago, it would sometimes appear and not go away, even after the film ended. I assumed someone was asleep at the wheel then. But it wasn't on 'Hea
  2. An excellent suggestion! Perhaps they could also have Christopher Plummer do an evening and have him comment on his favorite JB performances. I saw his one-man show earlier this year and he made feel as if I were watching JB himself onstage. Magnificent. His impression of Lionel was priceless...
  3. It's on 'Taxi' now. Glad I kept my old copy.
  4. "The level of vitriol on here is almost as high as on facebook" That's not surprising. I haven't been on these boards for years because of that fact. Arguments took over many threads and there were many people who seemed to be here only TO argue. I wouldn't liked to have seen things were mellower now.... When it comes to discussing films, it seems, there's a greater similarily to discussing politics openly in a bar than one would assume.
  5. misswonderly, Have you read Pierre Burton's Hollywood's Canada? It's very funny and highlights most of the ridiculous notions about Canada that Hollywood has propagated from the days when Canada was euphemistically known as 'God's Country' and every French-Canadian was either named Raoul or Pierre, wore a touque, carried a knife and always liked to rape the heroine. Very funny stuff. A unique passage illustrates the opening sequence of Walsh's Northern Pursuit, where a Nazi sub surfaces in Hudson's Bay and we see that great body of water surrounded by snowy mountains instead of swampy wetla
  6. And it's too bad Cooper and Carole Lombard didn't work together after one dreadful early picture and Now and Forever. I think Lombard would have made a great Hitchcock heroine had she not died (and I think Hitchcock probably felt the same).
  7. Hello Larry, Long time no speak. You're right, The Letter's terrific. I finally got through all those early films TCM ran last year...and wow, was she a beauty then or what? Johnny
  8. I've been a fan of this film since I was just a little one. It's one of the first Warners' pictures I ever saw and it's one of the most enjoyable films the studio made during 1938 (sure beats Secrets of an Actress!). And what a cast!!!! It's going to be dusted off again for the Claire Trevor day in August.
  9. So was I, and I got all of them as well, but The Mystery of Mr. X somehow got screwed up, and that was the one I was looking forward to the most. Oh well.
  10. Am I the only one who's noticed all the people who complained about the displacement of RM in favour SW's passing have remained silent in light of the 'promised' bumped films being finally aired? Or does it really matter?
  11. Really? Where'd you read that, or is it a joke? I like Rob Zombie, but I really don't think, or really can't see, the kind of films he likes (or I secretly like as well) as fodder for TCM.
  12. "What we want to see is old and classic movies, not modern crap. All the other channels already have the modern crap, and we don't need any more." You got that right!!
  13. I don't expect much from Paramount. Thank our lucky stars for WHV and George Feltenstein.
  14. 110 million people went to the pictures each week in America before the Crash hit, then numbers dwindled to around 50 million between 1932 and 1933. Warners, for instance, lost $14 million in 1932, hence, the huge lay-offs. Yet over at MGM, things were okay. 1934 found them 7.5 million on the plus-side. No wonder King Vidor had to personally back his production of Our Daily Bread because his home base (and every other major studio) didn't want a thing to do with it. Go figure.
  15. I put off buying the edition myself until I found it fairly reasonably priced. It is worth it.
  16. Thanks, path, for posting the link. Sorry I missed it in my excitement!
  17. The Region 1 release of The Blue Angel is the way to go, tracey. It's got the original 106 minute German release (which looks and sounds great) plus the original English language version, which is not exactly a pleasure to sit through but is fascinating nonetheless. In the thread on Dietrich, I mentioned the test reel of Dietrich singing "You're the Cream in My Coffee" with her verbal abuse of Hollander (I think it's Hollander) and that footage is included as well as some later live and interview footage. Avoid all PD versions and get the Kino!
  18. I just read over this year's Summer Under the Stars line-up and I'm hugely impressed, particularly with the inclusion of Carole Lombard and Richard Dix, which the tcmprogrammer alluded to a few months ago. Lady by Choice arose in a discussion yesterday and, lo, there it is (except the synopsis has Karl Malden as the film's star!). It might change; I found it earlier but I can't access it now. I've been having problems with the site all day and couldn't log on for hours. Either way, what I saw was superb: Ann Sothern, Claire Trevor, Angela Lansbury and even Joseph Cotten!
  19. Did anyone else notice the strange inclusion of the 1937 Guy Kibbee film The Big Shot in today's Maureen O'Sullivan birthday bash? I kept wondering why this film was included, because O'Sullivan isn't in it, but when the announcer mentioned something about O'Sullivan and Eddie Quillan after The Emperor's Candlesticks, I knew they intended the 1931 film also titled The Big Shot instead. Wonder how this one slipped through? Not that the Kibbee film is unworthy; I watched a bit of it and I'll finish it later. It looks like another highly enjoyable Kibbee film. Too bad they didn't stick th
  20. I agree as well. I've previously mentioned the regrettable absence of The Perfect Specimen, but I'm amazed that TCM ran Virtue and Lady by Choice. Maybe the ice will thaw in the future regarding the Columbia and the Universal/Paramount catalogue.
  21. You're lucky, The Emperor's Candlesticks is on the 17th at 9:45am. In June, there's a slew of decent pictures being shown all night and at that dreadful 4:30/4:45am time-slot. More if you live in Canada. One huge benefit about living in Canada is that we don't get to see The Bad News Bears tonight; we get Gentleman Jim. Similarly, when many more recent pictures are shown that TCM has licenced, we get core-library replacements, many of which haven't been shown for awhile. Thankfully, Satan Met a Lady isn't one of them. Too bad Front Page Woman or The Girl from 10th Avenue isn't; I screwed
  22. Too bad, really, given the cast and, particularly, its director, the hugely talented William Dieterle. He must have hated doing the picture so much he encouraged William to ham his way through the part just to make the days go by more interestingly.
  23. "I don?t know if it?s any good or not, but I want to see it!" Simply put, it's awful, and William's unbelievably hammy. You wouldn't even know it was a version of Hammett's book. Still, it's worth it to see what Davis finally wouldn't put up with anymore.
  24. Most of her early Warners' pictures. They're vastly underrated. Her performances in them are more engaging these days than some of her 'big' pictures of her later years. Though it's trite, The Golden Arrow has one of her most natural performances, so does Parachute Jumper. She's unbelievably sexy in Cabin in the Cotton and Ex-Lady. I'm very interested in seeing The Dark Horse, The Working Man and a few other early pictures during next month's SOTM tribute to complete my Davis viewing experience.
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