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KarenLucille

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Everything posted by KarenLucille

  1. Nope. Still not working. Now I am getting an error message. "There was a problem verifying your account with your TV Service Provider." I don't get to "sign in" anywhere (although I tried opening a new tab and signing into my DirecTV account and then trying to watch TCM on demand... that's when I get the error).
  2. Funny, while I like some of the songs from Superstar, I prefer Godspell overall. Isn’t it nice that there’s something for everyone out there?
  3. I didn't get to see the whole thing today (thunderstorms loused up a lot of my scheduled recordings on satellite), but I actually liked what I saw. Was disappointed I missed "Day by Day." Thoroughly loved seeing a young Afro'd Victor Garber.
  4. How might Streisand’s performance of the song “People” have felt different in the film, had she been more theatrical and expressive, perhaps even belting her song more? It would have lost the tender, wistful feeling this performance had. We needed to see/feel the disappointment that this relationship wasn't going anywhere. With a louder and more theatrical performance, it could have turned into either an over-the-top performance or conveyed the wrong emotion entirely. Note the emotional transition moments in this scene: how do the two characters relate to each other as the lyrics are
  5. I'm not getting into it, either. Actually, having trouble with most of the movies from 60s and 70s. (And I was born in '64... I've always thought I was born a little late.) So far, the only musicals this week that I can stand to watch are ones I've seen before and loved (The Music Man, My Fair Lady, Fiddler on the Roof, Bye Bye Birdie). A Funny Thing Happened... wasn't bad, and I could tolerate the Frankie Avalon, and Elvis movies. New ones that I found entertaining were Bells are Ringing and The Unsinkable Molly Brown. We'll see how the rest of today goes.
  6. I have favorite songs from animated musicals that are probably not super well-known, like Thumbelina and An American Tail.
  7. As you look back to the masculine performances in musicals of past decades, what changes in male representation, and performance would you say are most noticeable? No longer does the male lead need to be an alpha male or even a beta male. He is more like a "real" person, and his character that has been more fully developed than in the past. What other specific qualities do you notice about Robert Preston in either or both of these clips? Two things that stood out to me were his impeccable diction and timing and the how he convincingly played both roles. Have you se
  8. I was thoroughly unimpressed with Brando's singing skills. Sinatra should have had the Masterson role. Definitely prefer his version of Luck be a Lady to Brando's. That was TORTURE. And I agree about A Bushel and a Peck. Very disappointed it wasn't in the movie.
  9. In what ways does this scene look backward to classical musicals and how does it look ahead to new disruptions that we now know will happen in the movie musical? Like early musicals, Gypsy gives us a look at the backstage moments of show business. But rather than the technical aspects, we see the gritty, less than pretty realities of trying to get ahead in the business: an audition that may just be a sham because the winner has been decided ahead of time, Karl Malden as a man with no real power in his position, overbearing stage mothers... This is the introduction of Mama Rose in the
  10. Love Gene Kelly, but this isn't my favorite Gene Kelly film... in part because I really don't get into ballet scenes (that even makes Oklahoma tough for me to watch. Does a movie that has as stylized a scene as An American in Paris’ ending ballet need to use a less-than-realistic, stylized approach throughout the film? Thankfully, no. The ballet scene was fantasy, and as such, it works for its purpose. But as much as film is an escape, too much surrealism makes for not much enjoyment... at least for this viewer. What keeps Jerry Mulligan from being completely unlikeable i
  11. How do the pre-dance movements of O’Connor and Kelly compare to their actual dance movements? They begin reciting the tongue twister together, with a rhythmic cadence, almost mirroring each other's expressions and movements. This leads perfectly into the dance movements. Watch the Professor all the way through and consider the role of the straight man. The professor's almost non-reaction to what is going on adds to the humor. He is almost a non-human and more of a prop, as evidenced by the way they incorporated him into their routine as a table. He just adds another layer of funn
  12. As you reflect upon female representation in the 1950s, where do you think this film character falls in the continuum? Why? Calamity Jane is no shy, feminine creature. In fact, there is little about her that identifies her as a female of her day. Her dress, speech, and manners all appear more masculine (there is even a scene in which she is mistaken for a man). As the movie progresses, she begins to realize that most men like a bit of femininity in their women and begins to learn to dress, walk, and talk like a lady. How do you think Doris Day grows as an actress in her various role
  13. I think The Glenn Miller Story is the film that made me fall in love with Jimmy Stewart. I loved him in It's a Wonderful Life, but this one is one of my favorites. I really need to get a copy to keep on hand. We used to live near the Air Force Museum in Dayton, OH, and the Glenn Miller exhibit was one of my favorites. I really was born a decade or two too late.
  14. As you watch the interaction between the four characters in this scene, what do you notice about the way they include each other or relate to one another? How is it different from early musicals we have discussed? There are no breakout "star" moments of the song, where one person gets the spotlight, even though only one person may be singing at one particular time. There is a lot of interplay and glances between each member of the group during the song, but it doesn't feel contrived; these are friends who are having a real conversation, not performing to an audience. The group gives us a f
  15. One more reason for transcripts or captioning of the videos and for transcripts for the podcasts.
  16. I read the article mentioned above before listening to the podcast. I thought the author of the article was reaching to come to the conclusions he did. I tend to agree with Dr. Ament regarding blackface at the time. I believe the thoughts of the article's author are one of the reasons few people who go to Disney World know where Splash Mountain's characters really come from. Song of the South has been blackballed because it has been labeled as racist.
  17. What do you notice about the way the scene is directed as Petunia goes to Joe’s bedside and as we cut to her outside hanging laundry? What does this tell us about her relationship and the connection to the song? Seems that most of the indoor parts of the song focus on Petunia and Joe as she sings to him. The lighting highlights the peace and love on her face as she feels God answered her prayers for Joe. The outside scene apparently takes place a little later, as Joe is now in a wheelchair and recuperating from his gunshot wound. That she can sing with such emotion and passion while taking
  18. Thinking like a director and editor, describe how each shot spotlights key actions. The beginning of the scene with the narrow hallway sets up Garrett's cornering Sinatra and beginning the chase, leading out into the stadium seats. We have wide shots to show the expanse and highlight the chase, zooming in as she backs him into the wall. It's a very physical number, with the running up the bleachers and sliding down the banister. The blocking for that last bit was probably intended to hide the fact that they used a double for Sinatra sliding down the rail; shot from the back and with his ha
  19. I actually recorded all but one of Tuesday's shows and have watched all but 6 or so of them (working on Take Me Out to the Ball Game right now). My least favorites so far have been The Pirate and Words and Music. I enjoyed the music in the latter, but the acting wasn't that great, and the movie seemed to drag on a bit too long. I can't help but think of how different it would be if it were made today. Hart's life wouldn't have been quite so sanitized. I'm sure they'd play up his alcoholism and sexual preferences.
  20. Did anyone catch the recycled dialogue from For Me and My Gal that was used in Easter Parade? "Why didn't you tell me I was in love with you?" Loved that it was said to Judy Garland both times.
  21. It took me a moment to figure out who she was. Her voice had certainly not changed in her later years. She was a delight to watch. I agree that Lucille Ball's performance was forgettable. Almost every other musical number was more enjoyable than hers. Even her acting was subpar compared to the "kids."
  22. 1.What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her? I'm not certain, but it may have been The Wizard of Oz. It was either that or Meet Me in St. Louis. I loved her voice. I was in elementary school at the time and wanted to sing like her. I think I was drawn to her because of the movie as well as her performance. 2. How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously? It is even more obvious to me that there was more to her than just a pretty voice. She had the ability to shine no matter w
  23. 1. Describe how the scenes in today’s Daily Dose were designed to promote American values for audiences during World War II. Be specific. Refer to props, set design, settings, etc. in your answer. The scene begins at the White House. As Cohan ascends the stairs, we see Presidential portraits. His conversation with the butler about Teddy Roosevelt and "You're a Grand Old Flag" further puts the audience in a patriotic frame of mind. As he moves into the Oval Office, we notice his lapel pin of an American flag, the flag behind him, the paintings of naval ships and battles... Coh
  24. Same here, using the canvas app. Will try on my laptop later and see if it still freezes at question 3.
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