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Angela Bresadola

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About Angela Bresadola

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  1. Singing this song in this style makes Fanny seem more vulnerable and appealing. If Barbra had belted it as she did in the theater it would lose its intimacy as a love song. Film requires a more subtle approach. The two characters are clearly attracted to each other with Fanny appearing to be apprehensive that such a guy as Nicki is taken with her and at her own feelings. Nicki is clearly fascinated with Fannie. The staging emphasizes the attraction between the 2 characters with their own movement and the camera lingers on Barbra as she sings so we can see her emotion through the number.
  2. In my recollection of "Gaslight", Cukor used similar camera moves helped to enhance the viewers focus on the face of the actor to enhance the sinister controlling of the husband over his wife as he tried to drive her mad. He uses the same technique in "My Fair Lady" in key scenes between Henry and Eliza. Film allows the director to support the actor and focus on his/her changing emotions as can't be done easily in the theater. Eliza realized she is only a "project" completed and to be filed. away. She has fallen in love with Henry and now realizes she doesn't have a place to belong or fit in fully. Cukor seems to move his actors' position, front and rear in rhythm with these emotions.
  3. The scene depicts a typical backstage musical situation, involving tryouts for a vaudeville show. It harkens a trend to convey a dark story about the ups and downs in show business while a mother is hustling her daughters. The girls perform the suggestive song without any guile or understanding what it could mean to an adult. the viewer gets a sinking feeling as you realized where this is going (knowing Gypsy's story) and the sad world of child entertainers who have stage struck Moms. Rosalind Russell, who is a strong actress with her presence and a no-nonsense voice, enters as the domineering Mama Rose and takes over the audition. While she cares for her daughters. it is more important that they succeed on stage regardless of what the children want and what is actually good for them. Again, if this wasn't about Gypsy Rose Lee, I don't think the song would necessarily seem edgy or slightly sexual to me.
  4. 1. In this scene, the 4 characters actions are similar to the Let's put on a show motif where everyone ensures all are on board. No one is dominant except for the intro done by Cordova and Lilly and Lester are right there supporting him with smiles and assurances they can put on a good show as anything can be entertaining. This convinces Tony to join in. 2 Costumes are in neutral blues, grays, and white. No one stands out except for Lilly's wide skirt. This supports the all for one and one for all theme. 3. The set for the Faust concept is in fiery red and brimstone with a grim face on a green door is the backdrop to the actions of the 4 performers as they do comic routines and acrobatic pyramids. The design supports the selling of entertainment no matter what form it takes.
  5. The first movie in which I saw Wizard of Oz (I was 8). I was touched by her incredible talent for singing and selling the story. It still makes me cry. In Easter Parade, she is in full maturity and holds her own with Fred Astaire. Her comic timing is impeccable!. Not many stars would play a dirty tramp with teeth missing, especially after her beautiful look in "St. Louis", but Judy goes out there and brings it home. Best of all you can feel how much she is enjoying what she does. I know it was brutally hard work for such perfection, and she was often ill, but she clearly lived to perform. Lastly, she demonstrated her acting ability in all her films but the one that impressed me the most was Judgement at Nuremberg.
  6. In opening scene you can see the reverence with which Cohan views the White House and the portraits on the wall of various presidents (including George Washington). He speaks of the love he has for the country learned from his dad who "ran to fight in the Civil War". He also speaks of the great life Americans enjoyed as a way to spur citizens to rally to the WW II fight and protect what they have. His songs helped Americans fight WW I and are resurrected in this film to again muster the troops. Roosevelt mentions Irish American patriotism, highlighting how the generations closest to immigration, often are more appreciative of the freedom they found in America.
  7. Agree the styles are different. Powell was a percussionist and Keeler was softer and shuffled more.
  8. It is difficult to try to view this first musical with the eyes of folks who must have been thoroughly dazzled by the new medium of sound and music together in 1929. We have been exposed to all the developments in technology and the skilled Broadway talent that expanded the pool of performers. I try to slip into a childlike wonder (not easy) and appreciate this as a first step.
  9. While Jeannette is showing the deep focus regarding aiding her brother, it is clear in her expression that Nelson's voice helps her to see him as other than a means to an end. He isn't a smooth a film performer as she but it works in his favor as the stalwart Mountie. Jeannette had a brightness that sold her movies and quite a range as she demonstrates in the scene in the tavern.
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