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Susan Lemley

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About Susan Lemley

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  1. 1. Another example of the battle of the sexes is early in the film when Fred Astaire is dancing in his room and consequently disturbing Ginger Rogers below. Ginger goes upstairs and personally complains. Fred does not stop dancing, but dances on sand, and is flirting. So he has not yielded ground, but has changed his tactic. 2. The sexes seem to be more equal in power. 3. I am not certain if there was a desire for a new, more independent-minded leading lady from the public or if it was because more women were entering the workforce and this simply reflected social change.
  2. 1. The garter, the collection of revolvers in the desk drawer, and the presence of Alfred's lover and her husband, and finally the dialogue with the boss all contribute to the staging of the movie. 2. The violin music leads to what we believe is the climax of the scene when the revolver is fired and we think that Alfred will die, but he of course does not. 3. In depression era movies, the charming scoundrel comes out on top in the end.
  3. 1. I believe that the clip portrayed the belief that if you are cunning you can still make it big, even if you have no available resources. 2. Even though we may be down, but we are never completely out of the game. 3. The language would have been more risque, as well as costumes of the female actors and scenes with females.
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